Mahoning Valley Podcast Andrea Wood Interview Episode 37

You can download this from SoundCloud here.

If you want or need different audio files to download, head on over to the Internet Archive

AW Portrait

Today we are talking with Andrea Wood the Publisher of the Business Journal Daily here in Youngstown. Thanks for granting me an interview today Ms Wood.

I understand you were a resident of Poland for a while. Please tell me about your favorite place in the Mahoning Valley.

The Central YMCA in Youngstown

The Central YMCA Youngstown Facebook Page

The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley

2:35 I also understand that you and I have in common growing up in the Pittsburgh Area. I went to Central Catholic in Oakland, and you went to Fox Chapel High. Although it is not directly related to the Mahoning Valley, what was your favorite activity in High School?

Pure as the Driven Snow a Melodrama on Amazon

4:05 You started working in Youngstown for one of our local TV Stations WYTV Channel 33 as an investigative reporter and was promoted to chief anchor and executive producer. How did that come about? Moving to Youngstown?

Tokyo House

Affirmative Action

Michael Moliterno

Stacia Erdos

Tokyo House

11:04 What would you tell young people who are just starting out is the most important thing to remember when striving to succeed?

Youngstown Flea

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation on Twitter

Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership on Facebook.

The Youngstown Flea

First Youngstown Flea in April on Facebook

14:43 As an investigative reporter, you must have come across some stories that may have put your life in danger, what do you think was the most dangerous story you have reported on? And why do you feel that way?

Joanne Elaine Coughlin Missing

16:45 Why did you decide to become a journalist? What was the impetus for that decision?

Penn State

Penn State

18:48 What was you inspiration to start the Business Journal Daily in 1984?

Meals on Wheels of Mahoning Valley Page on Facebook. Go ahead and give them a like.

21:10 Once you started the Journal, what was one of the things that you had to deal with that you never would have expected to happen?

22:09 Many people sometimes forget that people in the media have lives outside of the office. What is your favorite off hours activity?

Michael Dyson

Tears We Cannot Stop by Michael Dyson on Amazon

White Privilege

Kathy Miller Story on the Vindicator

Greg Iles Novels

25:08 I am sure you have met many very interesting people in your life, Who was the most interesting and why?

Dolly Parton

Dolly-Parton-in-the-1970s-442243

Dolly Parton benefit for Wildfire Victims.

27:52 If you could do anything tomorrow, anything at all; what would it be?

29:27 What do you most want to be remembered for after you are gone? Is there anything that you want people to think about when they hear your name?

33:24 Is there anything that you wanted to talk about today that I did not ask about?

Dwight Stickler

Easter Brunch at Kravitz in Fellows Riverside Garden

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 36

Download this from Soundcloud

Get different kinds of audio files from the Internet Archive.

Final Autism Run-registration-2017-page-001

You are invited to be part of an exciting community event. On April 22, 2017, the Autism Society of Mahoning Valley will be hosting the 4th Annual Valley Autism 5K & 2 nd Annual Family FUN WALK for Autism. Get over to their facebook page and show them some love.

2017 Valley Autism 5K & Walk Donation Packet 2-7-17

Event Poster 3-13-17 – Autism Society-5k run-flyer-2017

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control recently revised its statistics on the occurrence of autism in America to state that one in 68 children (and 1 in 54 boys) are affected. There are more than 60,000 families in Ohio with children and adults and their families affected by autism; the largest percentage of whom reside in NE Ohio.

From the newly diagnosed child to the school aged children to the severely disabled autistic adult. These are all our families and they need our help.

The Mahoning Valley chapter of the Autism Society of America was founded by local families in 1989 to supporting families in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana counties. Its mission is to improve the quality of life for families living with an ASD diagnosis, and to bring about community change and opportunities for individuals working through life with this disability. Our volunteers are dedicated to accomplishing this through information and referral, family support, advocacy, raising awareness and resource development.

What do we really do? Here’s a typical morning call: A mother is driving home having just received the news that her 3-year-old was diagnosed as being on the Autism Spectrum. She is scared and sad. She doesn’t know what this means short term or long term for her child. Where to send them to school? What early intervention therapies does he need? How do I get funding for therapies and other services? Are there other mothers I can talk to about this? What do I do RIGHT NOW?

This is where the Autism Society shines. In our role as the autism “bridge organization” we are uniquely driven to work with all of the schools, therapy centers, support groups, community organizations and government agencies to bring together the necessary resources for families. In addition to direct calls for information and referral, we host educational, awareness activities to shine a spotlight on the many facets of ASD and the issues faced by children, adults with someone one the spectrum.

These include:

  • autism family social events and neighbor-to- neighbor support;
  • Seasonal events like Caring Santa, Sensitive Bunny and Family Portrait photo sessions;
  • Collaborative programs like Sensory Nights at the Oh WOW! Children’s Museum and at area libraries;
  • Resource programs like Community Autism & Disability Resource Fair; and,
  • Camp F.R.I.E.N.D, our summer day camp, known for welcoming neurotypical peers and creating community
  • immersion for participants.

This is why we need your support. What can you do? Quality programming like this can cost upward of $75,000/year.

At this time we are seeking fun family prizes to motivate our community businesses and family teams to raise money as part of our event, much like a Relay for Life event. Businesses will create teams in order to show their support of our local families. Families will create teams to support and rally behind their family member with Autism. Prizes such as gift certificates to local restaurants, museums, trampoline parks, movie theatres etc. will be prizes for families who raise the most money for the event.

We also need donations of bottled water, granola bars, fruit, donuts or anything else that would be great for our 5K runners and/or for our families. We also are offering several levels of sponsorship if you would like to have a bigger presence at our event. Details can be found at ValleyAutism5K.com. If you’d like to contribute, but in a way not listed, please let us know. Any funds raised by this event stay local and support our families in need.

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Tomorrow head downtown to the Soap Gallery for a community Arts Discussion. This discussion will be a town hall style discussion targeting the visual arts, related events, planned projects, and open discussion about arts in Youngstown. We welcome all Youngstown Community groups to discuss and present what they have going on currently and for the upcoming year.

If you plan to present during the talk please have your input written down and limited to 5-10 minutes.
Please invite other artists, community members, and those who have interest in the the visual arts in Youngstown. Street Parking is available in front of the Soap Gallery on South Champion.

Please message the Soap Gallery for any questions

Seniors in the Mahoning Valley need our help to eat today and every day. Join Mario Andretti and volunteer with Meals on Wheels Mahoning Valley. And please head on over to their facebook page and show them some love.

dress for success

According to the Vindicator, The Dress to Succeed Ministry celebrated its latest expansion with the grand opening of its showroom location at the Community Corrections Association building on the South Side.

Elder Rose Carter, founder and director of the ministry; Lola Simmons, executive director of the Home for Good Re-entry Resource Referral Center; David Stillwagon, chief executive officer of CCA; and Mayor John A. McNally, cut the ribbon yesterday for the latest boutique-style showrooms inside the Graphics Building of the CCA facility, 1507 Market St.

“The city of Youngstown fully supports these initiatives because once people come out [of prison], we don’t want them to come back in, and we want to give them the help they need,” the mayor said.

The ministry has been dedicated to providing donated clothes, shoes and other accessories for Youngstowners, with an emphasis on people returning from prison, since 2010. Carter said this addition further helps the goal of providing something for people who need it the most.

According to the Tribune Chronicle, Stephanie Parish said she remembers when she was a student at Niles McKinley High School, she competed in the Youngstown State University History Day event. Now as a social studies teacher at Windham Junior High School, she has her seventh- and eighth-grade students creating projects for History Day.

The YSU History Day will be 9 a.m. Saturday at Kilcawley Center and DeBartolo Hall at the campus. The 2017 theme is “Taking a Stand in History.” Program coordinator Dr. Diane Barnes and AmeriCorps Ohio History Regional Officer M. Carmella Cadusale are coordinating the YSU event

Schools in Ashtabula, Geauga, Mahoning, Portage and Trumbull represent Region 4 which will be part of the competition. According to their Facebook Event Page, Ohio History Day is a year-long research program for students in grades 4 – 12. Students who choose to showcase their work, compete at the school, regional, and state level with an opportunity to advance to nationals. Contests are free to attend and many aspects of the judging are open to the public.

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Ohio History Day is an affiliate of National History Day (NHD), an exciting program that makes history come alive for students. Students learn history by doing history. Students conduct historical research that leads to imaginative exhibits, documentaries, original performances, websites and scholarly papers. NHD reinforces classroom teaching by rewarding students of all abilities for their scholarship, individual initiative and cooperative learning.

National History Day began as a small, local contest in Cleveland, Ohio in 1974. Dr. David Van Tassel and members of the Department of History at Case Western Reserve University created the program to reinvigorate the teaching and learning of history in elementary and secondary schools. The program quickly expanded throughout Ohio and surrounding Midwestern states. With support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, National History Day (NHD) became a national program in 1980.

Now, more than 600,000 students and participate in National History Day from every state in the Union, Washington, D.C. and the U.S. territories, and the program continues to expand internationally.

National History Day received the 2011 National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama. The National Humanities Medal is awarded to individuals or institutions “whose work has deepened the nation’s understanding of the humanities, broadened our citizens’ engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans’ access to important resources in the humanities.”

NHD is supported by volunteers who coordinate its state and local programs. Thousands of people support the program by serving as contest judges, workshop presenters, mentors and advisers to students and teachers. On the local and state levels professionals based at colleges and universities, historical agencies and educational organizations serve as state and district coordinators to direct the History Day programs in their areas. The Ohio History Connection is proud to be the state sponsor of the National History Day program in Ohio since 1995.

According to the Tribune Chronicle, John Diehl knew there was something special about Sara Price’s basketball game. He saw her promise in middle school.

Price, a 6-foot-1 senior guard/forward, exuded that effort throughout high school, and it made her Northeast Inland District Player of the Year the past two seasons. She’s been the face of the Tigers girls basketball program and is heading to Ball State University next season.

best of the best

Before Price travels to Muncie, Ind., she’ll look back on her biggest honor to date — the Trumbull County Coaches Association girls basketball player of the year. Price picked up the wooden base with a golden basketball attached atop the award Monday at the 30th annual Trumbull County Basketball Banquet at Leo’s Ristorante.

Price, who averaged 21 points, eight rebounds, 2.2 assists and 2.1 steals as a senior, is the eighth Howland player to receive the award and seventh under current Tigers coach John Diehl.

Bristol’s Jeff Kassan won the honor while Diehl coached the Panthers in the early-to-mid 1990s. Taylor Williams last won it for Howland in 2012.

“This is something I can go back when I have summer camp and say hey, ‘You can win this award if you work hard,’ “ Diehl said. “I can pick out the things that I think can win it when they get to this age. Sara could (do them) in the seventh, eighth grade. It takes a lot of work to win it.”

This TCCA title goes next to her 1,000-point basketball and the net she cut down when Howland won the All-American Conference, Red Tier Championship.

“Every time I look at it, I’m reminiscing in the past,” Price said of the TCCA trophy. “It’s amazing. It’s a huge, beautiful trophy. The fact that I have it, I can’t even put words to it. It’s such an awesome feeling.”

Diehl already knew Price was a special player before high school. She took the next step by improving her game her freshman season — learning to shoot.

“It’s the smoothness of her shot,” Diehl said. “She shot real low when she was little. She was coachable because she brought her shot up and got it above her head.

“The one thing too, that kids are coachable.”

Price knows this TCCA honor doesn’t solely define her legacy and future at Ball State, but it’s nice to have.

She listened to Monday’s guest speaker, University of Akron associate women’s basketball coach Melissa Jackson. Jackson spoke of the hard work she had to do to get through college and in her coaching career.

“Girls from college have these huge honors,” Price said. “They don’t know the amount of work they have to put in. I put a lot of work into it. I’m ready for it. It’s a job in college.

“Having this under my belt is a dream come true.”

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Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 33

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This is the Mahoning Valley Podcast and it occurred to me that there a plenty of people here who may want to do a segment. Who may want to have their voice heard on a Podcast. Maybe you have an event or cause or just want to say hi to the Valley. This podcast was never meant to be all about me. It has been a work in progress. Well, it is your turn. If you want to record a segment and email it to me, I will consider adding it to an episode.

Because this is a community project, you must be a part of the Mahoning Valley or have some connection to the Valley. If you want to talk about your grandma or how you grew up in Struthers or what you favorite restaurant is, or favorite gym, or favorite bar, or favorite band or anything. It just needs to be about something or someone in the Mahoning Valley.

Free Shoutouts with Mahoning Valley Podcast

You may be thinking, how much is this going to cost me. Nothing. Nada. Just record on your phone. Record with your friends. Record on your laptop or tablet. Save the file as an MP3 and send it over. Send it over with any links or pictures you want to include. This is all about everyone here in the Valley. So give it a try. It is easy and free and will get your voice added to the Mahoning Valley Podcast Archive. Send as many as you want. Any topic. BUT, no bad language. I look forward to helping you be a part of the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

Reach out on Facebook and like my page.

Follow me on Twitter and Reach out there.

I touched on this a couple of weeks ago, and I am going to go by it again today. Get registered to vote if you have not already done so. Get involved with our local politics. Don’t leave it for someone else to do. Don’t try to say you don’t have time or it doesn’t matter. It still matters. Your vote matters.

Your voice needs to be heard. And if you are in Youngstown, you will have the opportunity to get out and talk to some of the candidates on Monday March 20.

Register to Vote with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Core Team Ministry of Union Baptist Church presents a Candidate Forum on Monday, March 20, 2017 at UBC, 528 Lincoln Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 44502 from 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm. Invited guests are all candidates running for Mayor, President of Council, Clerk of Courts and Municipal Court in the City of Youngstown. Come and listen, ask questions and be an informed voter! 330-746-1217)

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DYP with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Downtown Youngstown Partnership (DYP) is a community-based organization which seeks to foster an environment where businesses thrive, art flourishes, residents are abundant and community pride prevails. The group plans to fills the gaps where needed as it relates to attracting and retaining business and community pride in the downtown Youngstown area.

Please join us for our March 28 meeting! Appetizers and drinks will be provided.

5:00pm: Sign In & Welcome

5:15pm: Agenda

1. City of Youngstown Update:
– First Ward Councilperson Julius Oliver
– Michael McGiffin, Director Of Events & Special Projects

2. Business Spotlight:
– The Federal

3. Service Project Update
– Updates regarding service projects or opportunities.

4. Downtown Updates and Happenings:
– Open time to share any events, promotions, or activities happening with businesses or organizations Downtown.

6:00-7:00pm: Socialize!

A special thanks to The Federal for hosting this meeting!

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Ursuline Band Boosters with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Ursuline Band Booster Organization is committed to the music program at Ursuline High School and we need your help to continue our work. Our annual quarter auction fundraiser will take place on Saturday March 18, 2017 at Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish Center. Doors open at 5:30pm with the auction starting at 6:30pm. All money raised will support the Marching and Concert Band programs at Ursuline. Tickets are now on sale and can be purchased from any band student or staff member. You can also contact Roseanne Winner at 330-402-0075 or Debbie Pruchniewicz at 330-559-4004 for tickets. With 100 gifts to bid on it is sure to be a great evening.
For more info please visit our website at www.ursulineband.com
Don’t Forget Your Quarters!!

meals-on-wheels-logo_2

Meals on Wheels of Mahoning Valley needs you to volunteer. Our seniors need you to visit and bring by something to eat. And you would be in good company. Mario Andretti volunteers and so can you. Just don’t speed to get there.

Have a Podcast Party with me.

According to the Business Journal Daily, March 23 is the deadline to get your registration in for Spark Talks with Chris Thompson on March 28.Collaboration’s Essential Element: Leadership” is the topic of the March 28 “Spark Talk” presentation sponsored by The Raymond John Wean Foundation.

The presenter will be Chris Thompson, president of Civic Collaboration Consultants LLC.

This two-way learning opportunity provides hands-on exercises designed to develop and strengthen collaborative leadership skills. Participants will leave with usable strategies and approaches to increase efficiency and effectiveness.

The presentation will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Western Reserve Room of the foundation offices here. The cost of $10 per person includes light refreshments. The session is limited to 25 participants, and the registration deadline is March 23. To register, visit this website.

Ohio Optometric Association with MAhoning Valley Podcast

Congratulations go out to Dr. Rebecca Brown of Salem on her election as president for the Ohio Optometric Association. According to the Business Journal Daily, “

Brown, who practices at Essential Vision Care here, has served in the association as a zone governor, trustee and several officer positions. She was selected to her new role by a unanimous vote at the recent East West Eye Conference.

“It is a great honor to serve my profession and the many people receiving our vision services in this manner,” Brown said in a statement. “It is a blessing to be able to help people in our community every day, but it is very meaningful to be able to influence and help legislators understand issues important to saving vision.”

In April, Brown will be leading dozens of Ohio optometrists to the Statehouse for a day of advocacy. They will help state legislators learn the best ways to help Ohioans preserve and maintain their vision.

A graduate of Salem High School, Brown has practiced optometry locally for 13 years. She received her doctorate from the Southern College of Optometry and her bachelor of science from John Carroll University. She completed a residency with the U.S. Veterans Administration.

Brown volunteers for InfantSEE, Vision USA and Realeyes Save Our Sight Classroom Initiative. She also is an active member of the Salem Junior Mothers’ Club, Kiwanis Club of Salem and Dustin Huffman Memorial Scholarship Board.

KISS with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

KISS is a program that let’s school children bring someone they love to school with them. Boardman Local Schools carries the program and according to the Vindicator, it is a strong effort to involve parents in the education of their children.

As a working mom, Heather Newman doesn’t get to attend many of her kids’ school functions.

That’s why she was especially happy to be her son’s special person Wednesday at Robinwood Lane Elementary’s KISS – “Kids Invite Someone Special” – Day.

The annual tradition is a chance for family members, or another special person in a student’s life, to see what their student is up to during the school day.

“It’s about trying to bring the community into the schools,” Principal Don Robinson said. “The kids get so excited when they get to bring their special friend to school.”

Second-grade student Cooper Bartholomew asked grandfather Joe Novosel to be his special someone, continuing a tradition for the two.

Cooper said he asks his grandfather to come every year, and Joe always enjoys the visit.

“It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “I try to encourage him so that he is going to be an outstanding citizen and leader someday.”

Read more about the event in Today’s Vindicator or on http://vindy.com

For more great podcasts, head on over to the PodtoPod Directory

marchmadnesswith the Mahoning VAlley Podcast

A Canfield Native, Paul Krebs helped set up the NCAA Tournament this year. According to the Vindicator,

A 1974 Canfield High School graduate, Krebs is currently in his 10th year as vice-president and athletic director at the University of New Mexico. This was his first appointment on what many believe is the NCAA’s most prestigious and influential group — the men’s basketball tournament selection committee. Krebs will oversee Midwest and South Region first-round games beginning Friday in Sacramento, California.

“In terms of service and the committees to which they have been appointed, ask any athletic director and they will tell you that there is not a better assignment,” Krebs said prior to his Sacramento flight. “It is absolutely fun, the basketball is exciting and between committee members and NCAA staff, it’s a great group with plenty of camaraderie.”

The committee members even participated in a “practice” for Selection Sunday that took place in February.

“We met in Indianapolis about a month ago and went through a mock exercise, which was very helpful,” Krebs said. “Last Tuesday, the committee arrived at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square, started in earnest on Wednesday and never left the hotel after that. We created eight brackets on Sunday, which were based on the outcomes of five or six games and it just happens so quickly, which is why you prepare different brackets.”

Accommodating the media was also a part of the process.

“On two separate occasions, both CBS and ESPN came into our meeting room in order to shoot ‘B roll’ in advance of their selection shows,” Kreb said. “The stuff that we were working on at the time was put away and concealed.”

He admits that his time in the area during his formative years were a lot of fun.

“I used to get back home once or twice a year when my mother was still living in Canfield and have great memories of growing up next door to Dick and Dr. Ray Duffett, and Bob Dove and his family on Neff Drive,” he said. “Those were truly special times.

“I still follow YSU and President Tressel, know the great job Bo Pelini has done with the Penguin football program and also follow Ohio State as well. Twitter and Facebook has helped in that area.”

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 31

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The St Patty’s Day Parade will be at 1PM on Market Street in Boardman. And it is a free candyfest for you and your family. Bring your own bags and you can stock up for a whole year. Seriously. I have been in the past and even when we left the candy on the ground and only took what was handed to us, we ended up with somewhere between 2-4 lbs of tootsie rolls, lollipops, and assorted sweets. All in their wrappers passed out during the usual 2 hour or so parade of just about every fire department, police department, and many local companies.

St Patricks Day Parade Anouncers with Mahoning Valley Podcast

It is a beautiful and noisy affair. Sirens going off, horns blowing, and plenty of pageantry. Seriously fun as long as you are dressed for the weather and bring your own chair. And get there early if you want a seat right next to the street. Even last year when there was a rather steady rain and it was about 40 degrees outside. That was why we left the candy on the street if it was thrown at us. Because the street was wet and there was plenty of candy being handed to us. So how long has the Mahoning Valley been hosting a St Patty’s Day Parade you may ask? And what is the history of the Irish in the Mahoning Valley? I found you a few sources if you want to find out.

According to their website, This year the Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade celebrates its 39th Anniversary! Our theme this year is “May The Irish Be With You”. The Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade is one of the largest parades in the state of Ohio. Each year 25,000 to 30,000 spectators come out to celebrate this beloved family tradition. Among the Sponsors of the parade are WFMJ TV-21, The CW WBCB and The Vindicator.

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History of the Irish in Mahoning Valley and Youngstown with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

According to the Book, “Irish in Youngstown and the Greater Mahoning Valley” The first Irish Settler arrived in this Region with John Young; the namesake for Youngstown in 1796 and purchased 1000 Acres and settled down. Plenty of Pictures if you are into that sort of thing, just by clicking on the link.

For much more on the History of the Irish in the Mahoning Valley, Please visit Steel Valley Voices. An incredible compendium of historical accounts of the Hogan Family and other early Irish Immigrants to the Mahoning Valley. Fascinating reads and more pictures if you like history all compiled by our favorite local educational resource. YSU.

Starting to feel a little green and wanting to explore even more Irish Culture and Events? Well the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley is planning a neart of activities. Hey, wow, I spoke Ulster flavored Gaelic. Did you hear that? Anyway, Check out all the Events our fabulous library is planning to Celebrate the Green.

Mahoning and Youngstown Public Library Leprechaun with Mahoning Valley Podcast

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Library Leprechaun Lollapalooza Oh yeah, try saying that 3 times fast. Well, you can try it. I won’t.

Join in the Saint Patrick’s Day festivities at the Poland and Canfield libraries on Saturday, March 11. Irish food for sale all day at Kravitz Deli in Poland Library and Kravitz Express in Canfield Library. Corned beef & cabbage dinners, stout stew, corned beef sandwiches, Bailey’s cheesecake.

9:30 a.m. (Poland Library) – Leprechaun Magic Show

9:30 a.m. (Canfield Library) – Burke Irish Dancers

10:15 a.m. (Poland and Canfield) – Parade of leprechauns! Dress as a leprechaun or in your most festive Saint Patrick’s Day gear and join a parade through the library! Each child who enters the parade will receive an entry for a chance to win a book of Irish fairy tales. For children in grade six and under.

10:45 a.m. (Poland and Canfield Libraries) – St. Patrick’s Day story time for children of all ages.

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. – (Poland Library) – Lucky Coin Book Sale in the Friends of PLYMC Bookstore inside Poland Library. Select a coin and get a percentage off your total bill. Cookies will be provided for the kids. Check out the new Friends of PLYMC bag coffee that will be sold at the bookstore located in Poland Library. Proceeds benefit the Library’s children’s programming.

11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. (Poland and Canfield Libraries) – Scavenger hunt for grades six and under and a great time to visit the café for an Irish lunch.

12:30 p.m. (Poland Library) – Burke Irish Dancers

12:30 p.m. (Canfield Library) – Leprechaun Magic Show

Then on March 14th, ‘Tis the Luck of the Irish” Local professional musicians play Irish chamber music to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. No reservations are needed for this special program. For any age at the Poland Library, at 7 p.m.

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YSURF and the Mahoning Valley Podcast

YSURF is leading the way in creating private/public partnerships to improve the well being of our Community. A most recent example is the acquisition of a 200K Grant from Lift will create the first ever “teaching factory”. “Teaching Businesses” of all kinds are able to bring new ideas and technology to organizations that may be struggling to keep up with modern technologies while finding the staffers necessary to operate them. It is a brilliant way of developing economic opportunity in areas like our Valley where we need to continue to embrace technology to compete on a global scale.

According to Lift, As manufacturing becomes increasingly advanced, the industry will need workers with more technical skills to work on and operate the high tech equipment the manufacturing industry is using today and that will be developed in the future. For Ohio manufacturers to meet this growing need, LIFT –Lightweight Innovations For Tomorrow has joined a partnership among Mahoning Valley manufacturers, educators at all levels, and workforce developers, led by Youngstown State University Research Foundation (YSURF), to develop the Mahoning Valley Innovation & Commercialization Center (MVICC).

This public- private partnership will create an educational and entrepreneurial hub to share facilities, equipment, and instructors – all necessary to build the educated and skilled manufacturing workforce for the region.

The MVICC will serve as the first of its kind for the manufacturing industry, creating a “Teaching Factory” by replicating the concept of teaching hospitals across the U.S. The Teaching Factory will use shared equipment, facilities and training, all focused on the greater purpose of creating and shaping the talent of tomorrow and further developing incumbent workers today.

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Meals on Wheels Public Service Announcement with Mario Andretti.

The deadline to purchase tickets for the 16th annual Community Star awards dinner is Monday.

Co-sponsored by the Tribune Chronicle and Trumbull 100, the Community Star program celebrates local volunteers who go above and beyond to make a measurable impact in the lives of others. Ten people were selected from 47 nominations received this year.

“There were quite a few great nominations this year, and it was difficult to narrow to 10. This year’s winners have a huge impact in so many areas of our community. They are so inspirational,” said Sue Shafer, community events coordinator for the Tribune Chronicle.

The 2017 Class of Community Stars are:

D’Andre Bowers of Warren is the chief officer of Warren Neighborhood Initiative, which was created in 2016 with the goal of helping develop and revitalize neighborhoods in Warren;

• William E. Casey of Hubbard helped create the Adopt-A-Home program in Warren and donated $25,000 to help get the project that revitalizes the central city neighborhood in Warren off the ground;

• Amanda Colbert of Warren is a board member of Team Sanders Inc., a nonprofit group that provides after-school programs and focuses on community involvement, and she started Colbert’s Care, a group of people dedicated to community service;

• Shirley Frazier of Southington is director of the food pantry at Grace United Methodist Church on Drexel Avenue NW in Warren, a job she has given her time toward for 10 years. Frazier, a retired nurse, also volunteers at St. Joe’s at the Mall, a full-service health and wellness center of St. Joseph Warren Hospital;

• William H. Gore of Cortland is a U.S. Army veteran who as a member of the American Legion Post 540 in Cortland served as post chairman for the American Legion Buckeye Boys State. Gore also serves as chaplain for the Vietnam veterans chapter in Warren and is an active member of the Trumbull County Honor Guard;

• Elliott Heckman of Warren repairs bicycles and gives them to the Salvation Army to distribute to kids at Christmas;

• Lou Lepro of Warren is vice president of the Trumbull Deanery of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. In that capacity, Lepro, in part, manages the kitchen and dining hall and oversees and helps the volunteers. In addition, he helped form the Historical Perkins Homestead Neighborhood Association;

• James McFarland of Warren served and serves on several local boards, including the Warren-Trumbull County Public Library board, which he has been a member of for 20 years. McFarland also is on the Base Community Council at the Youngstown Air Reserve Station;

Dr. Farid Naffah of Cortland created the Avamar Foundation, which helps the elderly needy population pay for medication. Each year since 2010, he has hosted a fundraiser to raise money for the foundation; and

James Shuttic of Warren is president of the board of directors of the Fine Arts Council of Trumbull County, a role that lets him develop events to give artists a chance to show their work. An artist, Shuttic has created and helped install a variety of public art projects in the Garden District of Warren. Make sure to stop by the Fine Arts Council page on Facebook to give em a like.

“On behalf of Trumbull 100, we would like to congratulate all of the recipients of the Community Star award this year,” said Jordan Taylor, president of Trumbull 100. “Trumbull 100, in co-sponsorship with the Tribune Chronicle, are proud to be able to highlight the best in community service Trumbull County has to offer.”

Full profiles of each person will be featured in a special section that will be published March 22 in the Tribune Chronicle.

Tickets for the banquet at St. Demetrios Community Center in Warren are available at the newspaper office, 240 Franklin St. SE, by phone or by an order form that will run frequently in the pages of the Tribune Chronicle. For more information, contact Shafer at sshafer@tribtoday.com or at 330-841-1696.

The event is open to the community and the Mahoning Valley Podcast salutes all the winners this year for demonstrating and modeling the best in human nature here in our Valley.

Subscribe to this podcast on Podomatic and get a free Podcasting App.

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Episode 18. An interview with Jody Daniels of ReelPhat Media

Please listen , subscribe, download or share here.

Jody Daniels of Reelphat Media in Youngstown Interview.

We spoke with Jody Daniels of Reelphat Media about getting started in the music business. His current projects and living and working in the Valley. He gave a great interview here on the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

Lets listen to some of Jody’s first project with the Sacred Voices. Make sure to get over to Facebook and give em a like. And check out their Youtube channel here.

Checkin on U on Amazon

Checkin on U on Google Play

Checkin on U on Itunes

Checkin on U– Youtube Video

jd-7-graphic

You should also visit Reel Phat’s Website for an entire list of the songs on the Legacy Project.

Let’s listen to a part of the Sanguine Sonata by Jody Daniels off his latest published project called “Seven”

Sanguine Sonata on Amazon

Sanguine Sonata on Google Play

Sanguine Sonata on Itunes

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 14 Transcript

Listen here.

I don’t even have to quote a mainstream media source for this segment. By now, anyone who has access to media either print, tv, radio, or of course interactive media like this knows that YSU Football failed to bring home a championship last Saturday. And that is OK. It is OK that people sometimes fall short of their goals. It is OK to drop the ball. We still love our University. And our university teams. And our university faculty and staff. And yes, even our university president.

Failure and falling short does not negate love. In fact, sometimes when people fall or fail or suffer it causes us all to remember that we are all people. We are all human beings who have strengths and weaknesses. We all need each other to progress. Every person who you know is someone you need on some level to progress. If you are looking to do that. If you are looking for progress that is.

If you want to make things better for yourself and your neighbor. Then every single person you know on facebook or twitter can work with you. IF you are willing to work with them. And that is one of the things that I took away from YSU Footballs fumbles and turnovers and blocked kicks. IT was not those events directly that gave me the lesson. It was the Unity of the team after the game. It was how publicly there was no fingerpointing or blaming. There was none of that foolishness of if he did something different it would have been different.

There was only solidarity and kind words from the Coach and right down the line. There was only optimism that there can be another chance to improve. To progress. To move forward despite the fall. To find ways of making it better then it was. And quite frankly, that was the most incredibly positive and remarkable accomplishment of the entire season in my opinion. That as a team, they lost. But as an example for many people here in the Mahoning Valley, it was and still is a huge victory and a stellar example. Congratulations YSU Football Team and Coaches. You have set the bar for all of us here in the Mahoning Valley who are intent on working as a team to being good to our community.

Onto something that is easy for all of us to do as individuals. And that is embrace kindness. Let me first say that ever since I have relocated here from Miami Beach Florida in 2002, I have been impressed and pleased with all the kind acts I have witnessed and had the opportunity to participate in. Many people here do not know me and I did not grow up here full time. But it is time that you found out. I am actually from Pittsburgh by way of Miami Beach.

My family lived in Pittsburgh while I was growing up. First in Penn Hills and then Point Breeze during my high school years. And it was a wonderful place to grow up. Plenty of peers and people to interact with and plenty of opportunities to learn and grow. This was in the 1970’s. A time much different from today when if we wanted to call someone, we had to find a payphone or be at home. Or the office.

A time when as children we could have the run of the neighborhood without fear of being attacked or abducted. A time when our parents did not punish us by making us go outside, they punished us by forcing us to stay in.

I had a grandmother and aunts and cousins who lived in Northeast Ohio. For a time, my grandma lived in North Bloomfield. One aunt lived in Austintown with two of my cousins who were about my age and another aunt lived in Newton Falls. So I have always had family here in Northeast Ohio. And we did visit on a regular basis. So I spent part of my time growing up here as well.

But while the people who lived here may have felt that it was always the same old thing, when we got to visit NE Ohio, it was like a holiday. In fact, most of our visits were for the thanksgiving holiday. We would get time off from school. My parents would pack up the Station Wagon. We would crawl in the back of it and take the 2 hour drive northwest to Ohio. The land of holiday parties and feasts. The land of interesting and entertaining cousins. The land of a doting grandmother who loved to cook up all the thanksgiving fixins. And the land of freedom from our usual routines and friends. It was so much fun.

And so I fell in love with NE Ohio. Because for maybe as many as 15 or so years in a row, every thanksgiving my family and I would get to come here and celebrate family and love. And that is why when I was ready to leave Miami Beach, I wanted to come here and settle down. I wanted to come here and start a family. I wanted to see the snow and feel the cool breeze of a spring morning. And smell the cut grass in the Summer. And crunch through the leaves in the woods in the Autumn. Because here we have seasons. In Miami Beach, there are also seasons; 2 of them, wet and dry.

One thing that always impressed me when I visited here and after I moved back was the inherent friendliness and kindness of the people here. The good old fashioned Midwestern Values of God and Family and Hard Work. Of taking care of your neighbor and feeling bad if something bad happened to someone who lived in your community. Of wanting to pitch in and help. We still have a lot of these things here and these are the kinds of things that we need to continue to practice.

More so now then ever. Because our world has become increasingly hostile and divided by opinions. Sometimes we claim that we have the facts, and that may be true in part; but people have started to decide that their opinions are strong enough to be less than civil. And that if someone disagrees with you it is OK to block them. Or attack. So I have attached a graphic to this podcast to remind us of how to be kinder to each other. Not that we have forgotten entirely, but that kindness is one of the strengths that we can continue to build on here in our community. I have also linked to a facebook page and website that promotes kindness. I got this idea from one of the nicest people here in the mainstream media while listening to his show “Brainfood from the Heartland” Because staying informed can help us to practice kindness.

SCOURGE PSA

One of the most valuable resources we have here in the Mahoning Valley is the Public Library. When I first moved here to Boardman, I didn’t have any CD’s or DVD’s and one of my favorite things to do was walk over to the Library and borrow these types of media for my personal enjoyment. The fact is though that the Library is one of the most valuable resources that any community can have. Many of us may take it for granted, but there is a wealth of information and resources available to anyone free of charge. If you haven’t visited in a while, I encourage you to check it out. Here are few of things that you can expect to enjoy in a library and if you are in Trumbull County, your library is linked to here. Columbiana County yours is here.

In Mahoning County where I live for instance, The Columbus Children’s Theater will present the story of Lonely Jack, a foolish trade, and the giant who is ready for trouble. “Jack and the Beanstalk” was adapted by William Goldsmith.

Fun for kids of all ages. No reservations are needed.

Boardman Library, 11 a.m., Sat., Jan. 28

Meet and Greet Story Time with Youngstown Phantom’s Hockey

Meet the Youngstown Phantoms! Listen to stories and receive a special giveaway. No reservations needed for this special story time that will be fun for the whole family!

Canfield Library, 6-7 p.m., Tues., Jan. 24

Library Night with the Phantoms

Join the Library and the Phantoms at their January 27 game at the Covelli Centre in Youngstown. The theme is “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs.” Watch for upcoming details in your local library and on the website.

This is a very small list of things that you can do with your friends at the library. Stay in touch with them on Facebook.

I know most people who listen to this podcast can spend money to entertain themselves. Or even spend money to help me keep this podcast coming out and spreading only good things about our Valley, but I still like to talk about Free events every now and then. I like free stuff. Most people do I think. Like for instance, I offer free initial consultations and assessments on your internet communication strategies. I don’t mind spending a few minutes chatting with you or even talking to you on the phone about what you have been doing and what you want to do. You can message me on facebook or twitter or even call me at 330-519-1205 to talk about it. Sometimes it is good to have an objective opinion. And I am here to help.

Anyway, back to free events. It may save you some time if I just mention a few free things that you can do with your family or friends and that way you can get back to work on that report for your boss or that term paper or research project or watching that movie or whatever you will do after you listen to this. If you want more information or need to get the details for these freebies, just find the transcript of this show somewhere. They are like everywhere. But mostly on my website. Or blog, Or other blog.

Let’s go do something free:

What: Book Discussion Group “Blackberry Winter” by Sarah Jio

When:Thursday, Jan. 12, 2 p.m.

Where:Warren-Trumbull County Public Library

444 Mahoning Ave.

Warren, OH

330-399-8807

What: Kidz Cooking Club Registration Required

When:Thursday, Jan. 12, 5:30 p.m.

All ages

Where: Liberty Public Library

415 Churchill-Hubbard Road

Liberty, Oh

330-759-2589

Young cooks will follow Master Chef Miss Jill’s lead using their math, science, and language skills to make a delicious creation. For kids in kindergarten to grade five. Registration is required by calling (330) 759-2589.

What: Music and Movement Registration Required

When: Wednesday, Jan. 11, 11 a.m.

Age limit: All ages

Where: Warren Public Library

444 Mahoning Ave. NW

Warren, OH

330-399-8807

Children learn language and motor skills through an energetic combination of music, movement, and books. For toddlers 19 to 35 months old with a parent or caregiver. Registration is required by calling (330) 399-8807 ext. 206.

If you can’t make it tomorrow:

Check out these additional dates:

Wednesday, Jan. 18 or

Wednesday, Jan. 25

Just because something is free does not mean it is not good. I know there are two sides to that coin. Some people may say, “you get what you pay for” or even, “something is only worth what it costs.” But other people say that “the best things in life are free”. Like for instance this podcast. It is free. I really have no ambition to ever charge anyone to listen to or hear about the good things that happen here in the Mahoning Valley.

I gather this information and write it up for you for free. Sometimes, hopefully I am entertaining or at least informative. I admit this project is a work in progress. So I do something for you the listener for free, and I need to ask you to do something for me and for this valley. If you think that there are ways to improve our Valley, please share them with me somewhere. On facebook. On Twitter. On the blogs where I post the transcripts. Please participate in this project.

If you have any vested interest in improving this community and helping all of us live up to our potential then spend some money on keeping this project going. It is really easy to do that. Head on over to the website and send some money. Easy. If you do that, and want to be mentioned or linked to, just let me know. We can also work out ways for you to advertise your business or organization on other podcasts. Or even make your own podcast.

We can talk about ways you can improve your use of the internet to communicate through any channels if you want. I did offer to talk to your for free initially. If you want to run with some ideas I have and have me implement them for you, great. I like to work. And I have been using this here internet thingie for a long time. I know a few things about it. Let’s work together to make it better and spread the good.

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 11 Transcript

Listen Here

Transcript 12-29-2016

Youngstown Crime Down, Golden String Radio Benefit, Jingle Bell 5K in Canfield, Firstnight Downtown Youngstown, Evolution of the Guitar Exhibit, Championship Travel Packages for YSU Sttudents, and The Mahoning Valley Podcast Person of the Year

According to WKBN Channel 27, Crime and Traffic Fatalities are down in Youngstown, Chief Robin Lees said the city has recorded 18 murders this year, compared to 23 in 2015. “We’re still a little bit down from last year’s numbers, certainly not where we’d like to be, but it shows improvement,” he said. Lees also said fatal accidents have decreased. He attributes the drop to the use of radar speed cameras. Since officers started using them about a year-and-a-half ago, there hasn’t been a fatal crash along I-680 in the city. The chief says the effort to reduce speeds on the freeway has also helped reduce overall car crash figures by about 25 percent.

Improvement is really all anyone can ask for isn’t it? Considering the challenges that many of us face here in the Mahoning Valley; any improvement is progress. There was a time not so long ago when This area was considered to be a very dangerous place to live. According to Wikipedia, In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Youngstown was nationally identified with gangland slayings that were often committed with car bombs. The town gained the nicknames “Murdertown, USA” and “Bomb City, USA,” while the phrase “Youngstown tune-up” became a nationally popular slang term for car-bomb assassination.

Although many of us do not think we can do anything about crime in our neighborhoods or communities, that is a fallacy. There are things everyone can do. First be aware of your surroundings. Pay attention and don’t be afraid to call the Police if you have suspicions. If you see someone swaying their car on the highway, Call 1-877-7 Patrol. Save the number in your contacts and that way if you see someone driving a fool, you can do something. The number again is 1-877-772-8765.

You can also possibly get paid for participating in identifying and reporting criminal activity. Crimestoppers has been around for years. And still is operating an anonymous tipline. All information can remain completely confidential and all you have to do is call 330-746-2583. Or click the link in this transcript and bookmark the page. You can send tips online there.

Here is one thing you should NEVER do. And that is get involved in trying to stop any criminal activity yourself. I don’t care how much of a badass you think you are; never try to stop a crime in process. Always let the police handle it. If you see a crime in progress it is perfectly acceptable to call 911. You can get yourself somewhere safe and take notes or use your phone to record details, but never try to step in and intervene. That is not your responsibility unless of course you happen to be a police officer or sheriff or trooper.

According to their website there will be a Golden String Radio Benefit. Golden String Radio is proud to announce Gaelynn Lea live in concert at Purple Cat productions, 220 W. Boardman Street in Youngstown on January 17, 2017. It’s a variety show the likes of which only Golden String can pull off featuring your favorite Purple Cat Players, Casey Malone, our own Jimmy Sutman, and our guest of honor, NPR Tiny Desk Concert performer, Gaelynn Lea!

Musician and public speaker, classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been bewitching scores of fans with her experimental and ambient takes on fiddle music, an approach that incorporates her love of traditional tunes, songwriting, poetry and sonic exploration.

Her work most recently won NPR Music’s 2016 Tiny Desk contest, a competition drawing submissions of original songs from more than 6,000 musicians across the country. Other NPR Tiny Desk fellows include: Ben Folds, Yo Yo Ma, The Avett Brothers, Blue Man Group, and Adele.

Gaelynn Lea has been playing violin for over twenty years, developing and improvisational style all her own. She has performed alongside many notable Minnesota musicians over the years, including Alan Sparhawk, Charlie Parr, and Billy McLaughlin.

Come out January 17th to Purple Cat Productions at 220 W. Boardman Street. This event is to be followed by an afterparty / meet & greet with Gaelynn complete with hors d’oeuvres and drinks at the beautiful M Gallery in downtown Youngstown. All-night tickets to both events will be available for $40. Tickets to the afterparty alone will be available for $20. Contact Coni at 330-503-2584 or coni@goldenstringinc.org Ads are also available for the event program for next to nothing. Get a full page ad for $50! A half page is available for $25 and a quarter-page for $15.

JingleBell 5K Race at Canfield Fairgrounds on Saturday December 31 2016. Join us to celebrate the holidays with the annual Jingle Bell 5K Run and Walk Saturday December 31 at 1 pm at the Canfield Fairgrounds. Kids Run at 12:45 pm. This is a family oriented event that benefits to Youngstown Road Runners Club Scholarship fund for YSU track and cross country students and the Youngstown Road Runners Shoes for athletes program. This race is on paved and mostly flat surface within the Canfield Fairgrounds. Awards to top three male and female finishers overall, 1st Masters male and female, 1st Grandmaster male and female and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd in each age group.

Race day registration begins at 10:30 am and closes at 12:30 am. Standard registration up through race day is $20.00. Kid’s run (12 and under) is $2.00 – included is participation award but no shirt. Package pick up prior to race available at Second Sole (755 Boardman-Canfield Rd., Boardman Ohio) Friday, December 30 from 5 pm to 8 pm or Saturday at the Fairgrounds in the Commercial Building. Please pick up at least 30 minutes prior to race time. All parking will be via the Kilcawley Memorial entrance from route 46. There will be door prizes and plenty of goodies to eat post race. Bring the whole family! Everyone welcome to participate. Bells provided! If you have any questions please feel free to contact them at Youngstown.jinglebell.15@gmail.com

First Night Downtown Youngstown on December 31, 2016

Admission Buttons are $10 for Adults and $5 for Students (Age 13 through College, with ID), Senior Citizens (age 62) and members of the Military (with ID). Children 12 and under are FREE. Children do not need an admission button, but must be accompanied by a paid adult.

There are several FREE Parking Locations • Compliments of ABM Parking located throughout the city including: Stambaugh Surface Lot • West Commerce Lot (next to Cedar’s) • Chestnut Street Lot (located at Powers Auditorium) • The Voinovich Government Center Lots (Commerce Street and West Wood Street) and Ralph’s Parking Lot (Boardman & Hazel Streets) • First Presbyterian Church and • The Covelli Centre Parking Lot

WRTA will provide constant shuttle service between venues throughout the night.

There will be Event Schedule/Maps available at all venues throughout the night. The First Night Youngstown Event Headquarters will be located in the Covelli Centre during First Night, and any questions you have will be answered by our event staff. Admission buttons are available at all venues and at First Night Headquarters during First Night festivities.Restaurants will be open on Federal Street.

The Market St. bridge will be closed at 12 noon on New Year’s Eve to prepare for the fireworks display. Traffic will be redirected to the South Ave. bridge and the Mahoning Ave. bridge.

Many downtown streets will be closed around Central Square to provide for the safety and enjoyment of all attendees. Access to the parking lots on Front St. and Commerce St. will be open.

Wick Ave, Lincoln Ave and portions of other road in the downtown area have been closed for construction. They may still be closed for construction during First Night. Please allow extra time for arrival and be patient with the closures, they are necessary for upgrades to YSU and downtown Youngstown. Please call our Event Headquarters at 330-744-9966 and a member of our event staff will be glad to assist you. Or email infofirstnightyoungstown@gmail.com for more information.

This looks to be an event that will provide fun and entertainment of all varieties for the whole family. Looking at the list of events and entertainers shows there will be singers, dancers, arts exhibits, and Horse and Carriage Rides as well as a traditional Ball Drop and Fireworks. 13 different venues including OH WOW Science Museum and the Arms Family Museum.

According to the Butler Institute of Art Website, Medieval to Metal: The Art & Evolution of the Guitar

Medieval to Metal will open on January 22 2017. This is a touring exhibition that explores the artistic evolution of the world’s most popular instrument. It features 40 instruments spanning centuries of craftsmanship and design from around the world, ranging from the Moorish oud and Renaissance theorbo to the acrylic body of today’s modern guitars.

The exhibition also includes 20 photographs of renowned musicians and their instruments from legendary rock photographer, Neil Zlozower, and life-size photorealistic illustrations of historically and culturally significant designs from artist Gerard Huerta. “Medieval to Metal” makes its stop at the Butler Institute of American Art January 22, 2017 and will be on view through April 16, 2017. It will continue to travel the country seeking a final resting place to be announced in the year 2018.

“Medieval To Metal: The Art & Evolution Of The GUITAR” is a Touring Exhibition of The National GUITAR Museum. The National Guitar Museum is the first Museum solely dedicated to the past, present, and continually evolving style, shape, tone, and artistic demographics of reinventing the Guitar.

I have always been a huge fan of the guitar. Electric, Acoustic, even Steel Guitars have always been one of my favorite instruments. I think it started when I first heard Jimmy Page play Stairway to Heaven. His opening arpeggio and then the incredible solo break took me away from whatever teenage angst I was experiencing and transported me to a place where I could almost understand what it is to be rock and not to roll.

According to the Vindicator, YSU will be offering Championship Game Packages for Students and Recent Graduates.

The Youngstown State Athletic Department is has announced a travel package for YSU students interested in going to the 2017 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game Jan. 7 in Frisco, Texas.

The first-come, first-served package is for current students and Fall 2016 graduates. The cost of the trip is: double occupancy, $150 per person; triple occupancy, $100 per person; and $75 per person for a four-person room. The price includes round-trip bus transportation, two nights lodging in Plano, Texas, and one game ticket. Meals are not included. The cost of the game ticket and transportation is being covered by the university.

To make reservations, students must call the YSU Athletic Ticket Office at (330) 941-1978 starting at noon today with credit card information and a valid student-ID banner number. Only one ticket will be provided per banner number. The ticket office is open Friday 12/30/16 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The office is closed on Monday January 2 2017. Students should provide the ticket office with roommate preferences, though students must call separately to reserve a spot on the trip.

The trip departs the YSU campus (behind the Beeghly Center) at 4 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 5, and returns immediately following the game Jan. 7. Those making the trip need to be at Beeghly Center at 3:30 a.m. on Jan. 5. Parking will be available in the M-90 lot. There are no refunds. The general-admission tickets are located in Section 121 at Toyota Stadium in Frisco.

And now we honor the person of the Year for 2016 with the Mahoning Valley Podcast. We have looked back at the year 2016 to select and honor the person who made the most notable contributions to the well being of this Valley. And that person is Jim Tressel The President of YSU, Youngstown State University.

Let’s look at some of the things that Mr Tressel had a hand in to improve the lot of the population of the Mahoning Valley.

According to the YSU Website, Under President Tressel’s leadership, enrollment increased for the first time in five years and the university attracted it’s most academically-accomplished freshman class ever. In addition, the university revamped its development operations and hit record fund-raising levels, announced its first Rhodes Scholar recipient, reconfigured its executive leadership organization, froze tuition for two consecutive years and expanded its scholarship offerings. The university is also partnering with two private developers to construct new apartment style student housing on campus and is working with the city to improve major gateways to YSU.

Ellen and Jim Tressel made a $1 million pledge to create the Ellen and Jim Tressel Student Work Opportunity Endowment Fund at YSU, an initiative to help expand student employment opportunities on campus. It was the latest in an extensive list of fund raising and philanthropy activities for the Tressels. They also participated in the YSU campaigns for the Andrews Student Recreation and Wellness Center, the expansion of Stambaugh Stadium and the Watson and Tressel Training Site. In 2007, Frank and Norma Watson and Jim and Ellen Tressel donated a combined $1 million to the YSU Centennial Campaign to help fund the WATTS. He also was co-chair of the $110 million campaign for the renovation of Ohio State University’s William Oxley Thompson Library. Along with his university fund raising, Tressel has also been called upon to lead many campaigns for the entire community and its needs.

Tressel has published two books: “The Winners Manual: For the Game of Life” (2008) and “Life Promises for Success” (2011). His lengthy list of awards includes the American Football Coaches Association National Coach of the Year in 1991, 1994 and 2002, the Eddie Robinson National Coach of the Year in 1994 and 2002, Chevrolet National Coach of the Year in 1997, 1994 and 1993, the Paul “Bear” Bryant National Coach of the Year in 2002 and the Sporting News National Coach of the Year in 2002. At YSU, he received the Heritage Award in 2008.

And while some of the most obvious contributions are financial, like the Watson and Tressel Indoor training site named after he and his in-laws made a significant donation, his in-laws say Tressel’s most lasting legacy is the lives of so many young men he has touched.

“He would always see that they did well academically too, football wasn’t the only thing,” said Norma Watson, Tressel’s Mother In-Law. “They made sure that he was going to have good citizens.”

“One function he’s always done was help them get that first job once they got through college,” said Frank Watson, Tressel’s Father In-Law. The investment into his players, has had a ripple effect throughout the valley. Inspiring former players, like Elliot Giles, to lay roots in the area and also coach the game. “He always gave back and that’s kind one thing I like to instill in myself, is give back to the community as far as my flag football league,” said Giles. “You never forget where you came from.”

Former players talk about Tressel’s composure and poise while under pressure, and say it’s a characteristic he instills in everyone he’s around.

“No matter what adversity the university may face in the future he’ll be able to handle it and he’ll get the people that are working with him to be able to handle that situation to work together and to overcome it,” said Former Player Chris Sammarone.

Mahoning Valley Podcast Transcript Episode 10 for December 27 2016

Listen here.

Transcript 12-27-16

Shepherd of the Valley Plans New Campus in Liberty, YNDC Lots of Green Program, Free Christmas Dinner in Warren draws hundreds, Game of Hope Family Fest, Bike Racks that are also Art in Warren, Bracelet Sales to Support Emergency Assistance to Local Persons in need, YSU Football Team plans Meet and Greet, and Akron Childrens Hospital recognized for Innovative Patient Experience Award.

According to the Vindicator An upcoming facility for the elderly by Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Retirement Services is expected to create 200 local jobs. Liberty Township trustees last month approved a zoning change for the project, which is on Tibbetts-Wick Road. The venture, which is expected to cost between $26 million and $31 million, is set for completion in spring 2018.

The complex will include between 50 and 80 assisted living units, a 79-bed nursing home, a rehabilitation facility, a wellness facility and a facility for those living with Alzheimer’s disease. The 55-acre complex includes close to 44 acres of green space. Shepherd of the Valley also has locations in Boardman, Howland, Poland and Niles. “It’s a big deal not only for our community, but also for surrounding communities because all around here people are aging,” said township Trustee Jodi Stoyak of the Liberty location. “It’s going to be a phenomenal facility.”

And this a good thing for a couple of reasons. Jobs. If there is one thing we need more of here in the Mahoning Valley it is good jobs that pay a living wage. Few things can drive community development like a well employed work force. But there is more good coming out of this plan. The preservation of Green Space within the development plan. I am all for economic development but when planners ignore the necessity of Green Space within the plan they are dropping the ball. Where there are plants there is oxygen and where there are plants there is the reduction of CO2. Although many people wonder if reducing CO2 is an important part of living sustainably, I am here to attest to the fact that anything you can do to reduce your carbon footprint or preserve green space personally or corporately is not only intelligent and forward thinking it is ecologically responsible.

Speaking of Green Spaces, one of the most active and prolific organizations in the area of Community Development runs a great program right here in Mahoning County. The YNDC (Youngstown Community Development Corporation runs a program called Lots of Green.

According to their website, Lots of Green, the YNDC’s vacant land reuse program, seeks to repurpose all land in a target area, transforming the physical fabric of strategic neighborhoods. These lots are converted to community gardens, native planting sites, pocket parks, small community orchards, a 1.5 acre urban farm and training center, and side yard expansions. All of these strategies for vacant land reuse serve to both improve quality of life for residents and demonstrate best practices for neighborhood projects across the city. The YNDC has established 6 community gardens on vacant land, which provide space for neighborhoods residents, primarily low-income individuals and seniors, to produce fresh foods to feed their families. Vacant land reuse at scale also reinforces our homeownership strategies, fostering a sense of ownership and confidence for new investors in the neighborhood.

According to the Vindicator quite a few people showed up for a Free Christmas Dinner at Aulizio’s Banquet Center in Warren. Hundreds experienced the warmth of the 28th annual Families Helping Families Christmas Day Dinner on Sunday. Some came alone, while others brought the whole family to experience what Christmas is all about: caring about people and sharing the warmth of the holiday together — whether you are strangers or not.

“I have been coming about 15 years,” said Barbara Strother of Warren. “When I first started coming, I did some volunteer work. I liked to help out those who are less fortunate than I am because that’s what Christmas is all about. This time, I came out with my friends to spend time with them. It’s a great blessing to me that I get to sit here with my very best friends.”

The dimly-lit banquet hall gave off a romantic feeling that was enhanced by the sound of a soft flute playing in the background and Santa’s jolly laugh. Children ran around showing off new toys they received from Santa as a balloon maker made balloon animals and passed them out, offering lessons to anyone who wanted them. The hall felt homey.

Around the corner from the main dining and fellowship area were steaming dishes with smiling volunteers scooping the offerings up for guests. On the menu: ham, turkey, green beans, corn, mashed potatoes and stuffing. Dunkin’ Donuts, Piccadilly Parlour, Perkins Restaurant and Bakery and Panera Bread all donated to the seemingly never-ending dessert table.

“It’s like clockwork anymore,” said Dan Polivka, Trumbull County Commissioner, of organizing the event. “We have so many good volunteers. They know their job each year.”

And this touches on an ongoing theme of my podcasts. That it is in giving that we become the people we have the potential to be. That goes for organizations and for individuals. I know it seems to be something that we talk a lot about around the holidays, but the truth is that the holidays are a great reason to remind people that giving is a basic function of living in civilized society, but it is a year round attitude of looking for reasons to give and finding ways of giving that brings out the humanity in all of us. It is true that when we give to others, we do receive back. But sometimes we do not get anything back from those we give, but there is always a benefit to giving to each other.

GOT GAME? Want to Play in the Game of Hope Family Fun Fest?

If you do, or even think you do, it’s time to sign up to get on the roster for the biggest charity basketball game of the season, The Hope Foundation’s Game of Hope Family Fun Fest being held on Saturday, February 11, 2017 at YSU’s Beeghly Center.

The Hope Foundation of Mahoning Valley asks that each participant that is selected makes a goal to raise at least $300 through donations, side events, ticket sales, or any other means.

Here’s your chance to hit the court with local celebrities and a number of surprise, big-name ‘walk-ons’ to help raise money for our region’s chronically and terminally ill children.

To get on a team, Click Here to Fill out the Information Form. Space is limited and registration closes QUICKLY so reserve your spot today! With the RETURN of the Game of Hope, the effect will be that everyone is in this together will raise money for chronically/terminally ill children.

According to their website, The Hope Foundation of the Mahoning Valley (H.F.M.V.) a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization, was founded in 2007 after the increasing success and popularity of the Game of Hope Charity Basketball Classic. Unpaid staff, volunteers and supporting individuals and organizations are committed to our mission. We improve the quality of life for our community’s chronically and terminally ill children and their families through charitable support. With money raised from donations and our signature fundraisers The Foundation provides grants up to $5,000. For more information about The Foundation please visit the website at www.HopeMV.org.

According to the Tribune Chronicle Warren has commissioned some artwork that will also serve a public purpose; Bike Racks. It wasn’t bicycle weather as Doug Meyer and Carl Henneman worked to install the first of four bike racks that will double as public art projects in the city. Meyer, a metal artist who lives in Warren and has a workshop in Garrettsville, had to shovel away snow before securing the 12-foot long sculpture made from 1-inch tubular steel outside Trumbull Family Fitness near the corner of High Street NW and Mahoning Avenue NW.

He was commissioned by Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership, which received a $4,000 grant from the Ohio Arts Council to finance four dual-purpose pieces that would be both functional and artistic. “I’m familiar with Doug’s work,”said Henneman, who is working with TNP through AmeriCorps VISTA, a federal program that works with communities to overcome poverty. “He was one of the first artists who came to mind, and I contacted him to get a proposal in. He made a scale model of this, and it blew everyone away.”

“He was really good to do first, because he’s done this kind of work a lot and on a pretty big level. He has his own workshop. I just knew he could do it and pull it off,” Henneman said.

This is the kind of project that everyone in this Valley should support rigorously. Arts are one of the important activities that everyone benefits from. The Artists benefit from the fulfillment of creating. The patrons benefit from setting an example for generations upcoming. And the public benefits from the exposure to the different perspectives and opinions so as to help all of us understand that although we are all individuals, we all have more in common then we have differences.

Bracelet sales to support Emergency Assistance programs throughout the Diocese.

When you purchase a bracelet in support of our Emergency Assistance Program, you will be providing help, and creating hope to a family in need. Without the continuous support of our community our doors would close, and we would be forced to turn away those in critical need. Without you, we are nothing.

Our Emergency Assistance Programs combine material and financial assistance with advocacy efforts for people in need of food, shelter, clothing, transportation, utility payments, homeless outreach and other services essential to well-being.

Extending help and hope in times of crisis and need to families and children is a vital part of Catholic Charities mission and identity.

Won’t you please join us to support our neighbors and friends of the Diocese? 

Catholic Charities served 10,693 children through the Emergency Assistance Program in 2015.  We also assisted 754 people in finding shelter/homes in 2015 to prevent homelessness.  Thank you for your continued support.

According to Youngstown State University, The 2016 NCAA Division I-FCS National Finalist Youngstown State football team will have a meet and greet prior to the men’s basketball game against Milwaukee on Thursday, Dec. 29, at 6 p.m., the YSU Athletics Department announced.

The student-athletes will greet fans, take pictures and sign autographs before the game in the general admission section on the West side of the Beeghly Center. Fans can also participate in the Rulli Bros. “Holiday Hoops” promotion for December where fans can receive a buy one, get one free offer on general admission tickets by asking for the “Holiday Hoops” special upon ordering their tickets. The Penguins face James Madison in the national championship game on Saturday, Jan. 7, at Noon Eastern. It marks Youngstown State’s seventh appearance in the national title game.

Although many people may not give much thought to this, supporting college sports through attending the games helps to defray the costs of running the entire College. So when you go out to see a basketball game or a football game or any YSU sporting event, you are helping to keep the cost of a higher education down for all students. So get on out there and cheer for our student athletes.

Although this happened last month, I think it is important to recognize one of the premiere children health facilities in the nation. Akron Children’s Hospital was recognized for Innovative Patient Experience. According to their website, Akron Children’s has been recognized by Becker’s Hospital Review, a leading source of cutting-edge healthcare news, as one of 50 hospitals nationwide with innovative patient experience programs.

According to Becker’s, “The hospitals and health systems on this list are among those committed to keeping up with – or getting ahead of – the pace of change in healthcare by forming dedicated centers and institutes for innovation.” One of the ways the hospital’s patient experience program is innovative is in its approach, which the center’s director, Stefan Agamanolis, PhD, refers to as human-centered design.

“An increasing body of research illustrates how delivering a positive experience in healthcare can improve medical outcomes,” Agamanolis said. “For example, reducing stress and anxiety strengthens the immune system, which in turn impacts infection and recovery rates. If an institution is to fully embody a mission to solve medical problems and improve health, it cannot merely provide a technical service – it must also be able to deliver thoughts and feelings in the same way any other business working with human beings must do so.”

The Akron Children’s Hospital Foundation works to ensure that the hospital can continue to uphold its three promises: treat each other the way we’d want to be treated; treat each child as if he was our own; and turn no child away because of a family’s inability to pay.

Your financial and in-kind donations help support our mission, and we’re grateful for your support. Each gift, regardless of its size, makes a difference in the patients we care for every day.

Mama’s Boys and Daddy’s Girls

If this is you, I will try to be civil. But please grow up. Stop treating your “boyfriend” like he is supposed treat you like a princess. You know why I ask?

Cause he is afraid to ask you himself. Because likely you act like some crazed emotional terrorist. Likely every time he says something or does something that is not daddy like, you go off on some psychotic rant about how he just doesn’t understand and he doesn’t care. You stomp your feet and snarl like some kind of feral animal and start to throw stuff at him. Or worse yet, you go an sulk in the corner somewhere and manipulate him into trying to somehow placate your selfish ideas of how you should be treated.

Daddy’s girls have no sense of themselves. That is why if you are in a relationship with one of these types; dude you got to get clear and now. Or you need to read this right now. Ain’t no way you are ever going to add up to how daddy treated or treats her. And even if you could, you aint going to be ever having no life of your own. Cause she be thinking she belongs at the center of your world.

Maybe she belongs in your world, buit if you make the mistake of making her the center of it; you are putting yourself in the position of being terrified she is going to find herself a better daddy tomorrow if you don’t live up to her unrealistic expectations. That aint no way to live, man.

So here is the bottom line. If you want to be a daddy’s girl, fine; but stop trying to act like you are emotionally mature enough to have a man. You aint. So let that man go. Stop torturing him and trying to make him feel like he has to live up to your expectations. Please grow up or let that man go

So mama’s boy, its your turn. Please grow up. Stop treating your woman like her only purpose in life is to wipe your nose and clean up after you. You know why I ask?

Same as above, because she is probably afraid to ask you herself. Because likely anytime she asks you to do some dishes or help out around the house or with the childrens, you act like it is such a huge imposition, that she is afraid you will go out with the boys again for a few beers and come home and start whooping her or just puke in the bathtub and expect her to clean it up in the morning.

According to Wikipedia, your attachment to your mother could mean that you need some counseling duder. Check this:

“A mother’s boy may be effete or effeminate, or might be perceived as being macho, or might have a personality disorder, such as avoidant personality disorder, or might be schizophrenic, so that the mother acts as a caretaker.”

It could also simply mean that you are not ready to be monogamous. So stop leading her on and making her think you are going to settle down eventually. At least be honest with yourself about how much you love your mommy.

If you are dating a mama’s boy, lady you got either admit it and get gone quick; or start accepting it for what it is. Don’t make the mistake of thinking you are going to change him or he is going to grow out of it or you may be finding yourself on the floor wiping the blood of your mouth the next time you have a conflict about how to raise the children or take care of the house.

And really this is why I tend to discriminate against these kinds of behaviors. Because we were not put on this earth to try to replace the emotional support that most of us have had when we were growing up. We grow up so we can provide each other with that sort of support. You know all that “give to get” stuff.

So check yourself. If you are in a relationship to try to replace one of your parent’s place in your life; you probably need to get free for a while and find your self. You are better off going back to daddy or mommy until you are ready to fly on your own. Than try to fly too soon and take your mate down with you.

Image Courtesy of Jar of Quotes

Todays Target Gender Politics

Image Courtesy of Timeforequality.org

Why Gender Politics? Why should I discriminate against Gender Politics? Well in my opinion because it is stupid to try to pigeonhole a person into any role just because that is what society as a whole expects in whatever time you happen to live in.

So if we lived 50 years ago and I wanted to stay home and take care of the children instead of go out into the world and get a job; I may have been ostracized. Likewise, today if someone would prefer to work and take care of himself or herself rather than have children, they are looked on as weird or gay.

Gender politics have been used by strong and rich people to oppress poor and weak people since the beginning of civilized society and it has gotten people nowhere closer to understanding each other than any other form of politics.

It is ridiculous in my opinion to say stupid things like, “I am a man, so I must go out and win the bread for the family.” Or “I am a woman, so I must stay home and scrub the skid marks out of my man’s undies and clean up after him.” Just because that is what society or culture says. Forget that noise.

It is ok if you choose to play the role of breadwinner or housewife. As long as you are choosing it for yourself. It is completely bullsquaggle if you are choosing these roles because culture, or society or your mamma or your grandpa is telling you to.

I know that choices are sometimes hard to make and it can take time to decide what roles are right for a person to play. However, please don’t decide what your life can be just because of your gender.  Do you have any ideas on this topic? Please share.