Mahoning Valley Podcast Andrea Wood Interview Episode 37

You can download this from SoundCloud here.

If you want or need different audio files to download, head on over to the Internet Archive

AW Portrait

Today we are talking with Andrea Wood the Publisher of the Business Journal Daily here in Youngstown. Thanks for granting me an interview today Ms Wood.

I understand you were a resident of Poland for a while. Please tell me about your favorite place in the Mahoning Valley.

The Central YMCA in Youngstown

The Central YMCA Youngstown Facebook Page

The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley

2:35 I also understand that you and I have in common growing up in the Pittsburgh Area. I went to Central Catholic in Oakland, and you went to Fox Chapel High. Although it is not directly related to the Mahoning Valley, what was your favorite activity in High School?

Pure as the Driven Snow a Melodrama on Amazon

4:05 You started working in Youngstown for one of our local TV Stations WYTV Channel 33 as an investigative reporter and was promoted to chief anchor and executive producer. How did that come about? Moving to Youngstown?

Tokyo House

Affirmative Action

Michael Moliterno

Stacia Erdos

Tokyo House

11:04 What would you tell young people who are just starting out is the most important thing to remember when striving to succeed?

Youngstown Flea

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation on Twitter

Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership on Facebook.

The Youngstown Flea

First Youngstown Flea in April on Facebook

14:43 As an investigative reporter, you must have come across some stories that may have put your life in danger, what do you think was the most dangerous story you have reported on? And why do you feel that way?

Joanne Elaine Coughlin Missing

16:45 Why did you decide to become a journalist? What was the impetus for that decision?

Penn State

Penn State

18:48 What was you inspiration to start the Business Journal Daily in 1984?

Meals on Wheels of Mahoning Valley Page on Facebook. Go ahead and give them a like.

21:10 Once you started the Journal, what was one of the things that you had to deal with that you never would have expected to happen?

22:09 Many people sometimes forget that people in the media have lives outside of the office. What is your favorite off hours activity?

Michael Dyson

Tears We Cannot Stop by Michael Dyson on Amazon

White Privilege

Kathy Miller Story on the Vindicator

Greg Iles Novels

25:08 I am sure you have met many very interesting people in your life, Who was the most interesting and why?

Dolly Parton

Dolly-Parton-in-the-1970s-442243

Dolly Parton benefit for Wildfire Victims.

27:52 If you could do anything tomorrow, anything at all; what would it be?

29:27 What do you most want to be remembered for after you are gone? Is there anything that you want people to think about when they hear your name?

33:24 Is there anything that you wanted to talk about today that I did not ask about?

Dwight Stickler

Easter Brunch at Kravitz in Fellows Riverside Garden

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 36

Download this from Soundcloud

Get different kinds of audio files from the Internet Archive.

Final Autism Run-registration-2017-page-001

You are invited to be part of an exciting community event. On April 22, 2017, the Autism Society of Mahoning Valley will be hosting the 4th Annual Valley Autism 5K & 2 nd Annual Family FUN WALK for Autism. Get over to their facebook page and show them some love.

2017 Valley Autism 5K & Walk Donation Packet 2-7-17

Event Poster 3-13-17 – Autism Society-5k run-flyer-2017

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control recently revised its statistics on the occurrence of autism in America to state that one in 68 children (and 1 in 54 boys) are affected. There are more than 60,000 families in Ohio with children and adults and their families affected by autism; the largest percentage of whom reside in NE Ohio.

From the newly diagnosed child to the school aged children to the severely disabled autistic adult. These are all our families and they need our help.

The Mahoning Valley chapter of the Autism Society of America was founded by local families in 1989 to supporting families in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana counties. Its mission is to improve the quality of life for families living with an ASD diagnosis, and to bring about community change and opportunities for individuals working through life with this disability. Our volunteers are dedicated to accomplishing this through information and referral, family support, advocacy, raising awareness and resource development.

What do we really do? Here’s a typical morning call: A mother is driving home having just received the news that her 3-year-old was diagnosed as being on the Autism Spectrum. She is scared and sad. She doesn’t know what this means short term or long term for her child. Where to send them to school? What early intervention therapies does he need? How do I get funding for therapies and other services? Are there other mothers I can talk to about this? What do I do RIGHT NOW?

This is where the Autism Society shines. In our role as the autism “bridge organization” we are uniquely driven to work with all of the schools, therapy centers, support groups, community organizations and government agencies to bring together the necessary resources for families. In addition to direct calls for information and referral, we host educational, awareness activities to shine a spotlight on the many facets of ASD and the issues faced by children, adults with someone one the spectrum.

These include:

  • autism family social events and neighbor-to- neighbor support;
  • Seasonal events like Caring Santa, Sensitive Bunny and Family Portrait photo sessions;
  • Collaborative programs like Sensory Nights at the Oh WOW! Children’s Museum and at area libraries;
  • Resource programs like Community Autism & Disability Resource Fair; and,
  • Camp F.R.I.E.N.D, our summer day camp, known for welcoming neurotypical peers and creating community
  • immersion for participants.

This is why we need your support. What can you do? Quality programming like this can cost upward of $75,000/year.

At this time we are seeking fun family prizes to motivate our community businesses and family teams to raise money as part of our event, much like a Relay for Life event. Businesses will create teams in order to show their support of our local families. Families will create teams to support and rally behind their family member with Autism. Prizes such as gift certificates to local restaurants, museums, trampoline parks, movie theatres etc. will be prizes for families who raise the most money for the event.

We also need donations of bottled water, granola bars, fruit, donuts or anything else that would be great for our 5K runners and/or for our families. We also are offering several levels of sponsorship if you would like to have a bigger presence at our event. Details can be found at ValleyAutism5K.com. If you’d like to contribute, but in a way not listed, please let us know. Any funds raised by this event stay local and support our families in need.

Community-Art-Logo-Web-2x-1

Tomorrow head downtown to the Soap Gallery for a community Arts Discussion. This discussion will be a town hall style discussion targeting the visual arts, related events, planned projects, and open discussion about arts in Youngstown. We welcome all Youngstown Community groups to discuss and present what they have going on currently and for the upcoming year.

If you plan to present during the talk please have your input written down and limited to 5-10 minutes.
Please invite other artists, community members, and those who have interest in the the visual arts in Youngstown. Street Parking is available in front of the Soap Gallery on South Champion.

Please message the Soap Gallery for any questions

Seniors in the Mahoning Valley need our help to eat today and every day. Join Mario Andretti and volunteer with Meals on Wheels Mahoning Valley. And please head on over to their facebook page and show them some love.

dress for success

According to the Vindicator, The Dress to Succeed Ministry celebrated its latest expansion with the grand opening of its showroom location at the Community Corrections Association building on the South Side.

Elder Rose Carter, founder and director of the ministry; Lola Simmons, executive director of the Home for Good Re-entry Resource Referral Center; David Stillwagon, chief executive officer of CCA; and Mayor John A. McNally, cut the ribbon yesterday for the latest boutique-style showrooms inside the Graphics Building of the CCA facility, 1507 Market St.

“The city of Youngstown fully supports these initiatives because once people come out [of prison], we don’t want them to come back in, and we want to give them the help they need,” the mayor said.

The ministry has been dedicated to providing donated clothes, shoes and other accessories for Youngstowners, with an emphasis on people returning from prison, since 2010. Carter said this addition further helps the goal of providing something for people who need it the most.

According to the Tribune Chronicle, Stephanie Parish said she remembers when she was a student at Niles McKinley High School, she competed in the Youngstown State University History Day event. Now as a social studies teacher at Windham Junior High School, she has her seventh- and eighth-grade students creating projects for History Day.

The YSU History Day will be 9 a.m. Saturday at Kilcawley Center and DeBartolo Hall at the campus. The 2017 theme is “Taking a Stand in History.” Program coordinator Dr. Diane Barnes and AmeriCorps Ohio History Regional Officer M. Carmella Cadusale are coordinating the YSU event

Schools in Ashtabula, Geauga, Mahoning, Portage and Trumbull represent Region 4 which will be part of the competition. According to their Facebook Event Page, Ohio History Day is a year-long research program for students in grades 4 – 12. Students who choose to showcase their work, compete at the school, regional, and state level with an opportunity to advance to nationals. Contests are free to attend and many aspects of the judging are open to the public.

TakingaStandinHistory_2017-1-282x300-282x300

Ohio History Day is an affiliate of National History Day (NHD), an exciting program that makes history come alive for students. Students learn history by doing history. Students conduct historical research that leads to imaginative exhibits, documentaries, original performances, websites and scholarly papers. NHD reinforces classroom teaching by rewarding students of all abilities for their scholarship, individual initiative and cooperative learning.

National History Day began as a small, local contest in Cleveland, Ohio in 1974. Dr. David Van Tassel and members of the Department of History at Case Western Reserve University created the program to reinvigorate the teaching and learning of history in elementary and secondary schools. The program quickly expanded throughout Ohio and surrounding Midwestern states. With support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, National History Day (NHD) became a national program in 1980.

Now, more than 600,000 students and participate in National History Day from every state in the Union, Washington, D.C. and the U.S. territories, and the program continues to expand internationally.

National History Day received the 2011 National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama. The National Humanities Medal is awarded to individuals or institutions “whose work has deepened the nation’s understanding of the humanities, broadened our citizens’ engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans’ access to important resources in the humanities.”

NHD is supported by volunteers who coordinate its state and local programs. Thousands of people support the program by serving as contest judges, workshop presenters, mentors and advisers to students and teachers. On the local and state levels professionals based at colleges and universities, historical agencies and educational organizations serve as state and district coordinators to direct the History Day programs in their areas. The Ohio History Connection is proud to be the state sponsor of the National History Day program in Ohio since 1995.

According to the Tribune Chronicle, John Diehl knew there was something special about Sara Price’s basketball game. He saw her promise in middle school.

Price, a 6-foot-1 senior guard/forward, exuded that effort throughout high school, and it made her Northeast Inland District Player of the Year the past two seasons. She’s been the face of the Tigers girls basketball program and is heading to Ball State University next season.

best of the best

Before Price travels to Muncie, Ind., she’ll look back on her biggest honor to date — the Trumbull County Coaches Association girls basketball player of the year. Price picked up the wooden base with a golden basketball attached atop the award Monday at the 30th annual Trumbull County Basketball Banquet at Leo’s Ristorante.

Price, who averaged 21 points, eight rebounds, 2.2 assists and 2.1 steals as a senior, is the eighth Howland player to receive the award and seventh under current Tigers coach John Diehl.

Bristol’s Jeff Kassan won the honor while Diehl coached the Panthers in the early-to-mid 1990s. Taylor Williams last won it for Howland in 2012.

“This is something I can go back when I have summer camp and say hey, ‘You can win this award if you work hard,’ “ Diehl said. “I can pick out the things that I think can win it when they get to this age. Sara could (do them) in the seventh, eighth grade. It takes a lot of work to win it.”

This TCCA title goes next to her 1,000-point basketball and the net she cut down when Howland won the All-American Conference, Red Tier Championship.

“Every time I look at it, I’m reminiscing in the past,” Price said of the TCCA trophy. “It’s amazing. It’s a huge, beautiful trophy. The fact that I have it, I can’t even put words to it. It’s such an awesome feeling.”

Diehl already knew Price was a special player before high school. She took the next step by improving her game her freshman season — learning to shoot.

“It’s the smoothness of her shot,” Diehl said. “She shot real low when she was little. She was coachable because she brought her shot up and got it above her head.

“The one thing too, that kids are coachable.”

Price knows this TCCA honor doesn’t solely define her legacy and future at Ball State, but it’s nice to have.

She listened to Monday’s guest speaker, University of Akron associate women’s basketball coach Melissa Jackson. Jackson spoke of the hard work she had to do to get through college and in her coaching career.

“Girls from college have these huge honors,” Price said. “They don’t know the amount of work they have to put in. I put a lot of work into it. I’m ready for it. It’s a job in college.

“Having this under my belt is a dream come true.”

Like my page on Facebook.