Mahoning Valley Podcast Andrea Wood Interview Episode 37

You can download this from SoundCloud here.

If you want or need different audio files to download, head on over to the Internet Archive

AW Portrait

Today we are talking with Andrea Wood the Publisher of the Business Journal Daily here in Youngstown. Thanks for granting me an interview today Ms Wood.

I understand you were a resident of Poland for a while. Please tell me about your favorite place in the Mahoning Valley.

The Central YMCA in Youngstown

The Central YMCA Youngstown Facebook Page

The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley

2:35 I also understand that you and I have in common growing up in the Pittsburgh Area. I went to Central Catholic in Oakland, and you went to Fox Chapel High. Although it is not directly related to the Mahoning Valley, what was your favorite activity in High School?

Pure as the Driven Snow a Melodrama on Amazon

4:05 You started working in Youngstown for one of our local TV Stations WYTV Channel 33 as an investigative reporter and was promoted to chief anchor and executive producer. How did that come about? Moving to Youngstown?

Tokyo House

Affirmative Action

Michael Moliterno

Stacia Erdos

Tokyo House

11:04 What would you tell young people who are just starting out is the most important thing to remember when striving to succeed?

Youngstown Flea

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation on Twitter

Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership on Facebook.

The Youngstown Flea

First Youngstown Flea in April on Facebook

14:43 As an investigative reporter, you must have come across some stories that may have put your life in danger, what do you think was the most dangerous story you have reported on? And why do you feel that way?

Joanne Elaine Coughlin Missing

16:45 Why did you decide to become a journalist? What was the impetus for that decision?

Penn State

Penn State

18:48 What was you inspiration to start the Business Journal Daily in 1984?

Meals on Wheels of Mahoning Valley Page on Facebook. Go ahead and give them a like.

21:10 Once you started the Journal, what was one of the things that you had to deal with that you never would have expected to happen?

22:09 Many people sometimes forget that people in the media have lives outside of the office. What is your favorite off hours activity?

Michael Dyson

Tears We Cannot Stop by Michael Dyson on Amazon

White Privilege

Kathy Miller Story on the Vindicator

Greg Iles Novels

25:08 I am sure you have met many very interesting people in your life, Who was the most interesting and why?

Dolly Parton

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Dolly Parton benefit for Wildfire Victims.

27:52 If you could do anything tomorrow, anything at all; what would it be?

29:27 What do you most want to be remembered for after you are gone? Is there anything that you want people to think about when they hear your name?

33:24 Is there anything that you wanted to talk about today that I did not ask about?

Dwight Stickler

Easter Brunch at Kravitz in Fellows Riverside Garden

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 32

Bootlegger Edition

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Northeast Ohio is full of great entrepreneurial talent. If you have an idea and you want to make it happen, SunDown RunDown is the best place to showcase your idea and grab a beer while you’re there. Doors open at 5:30pm, pitches start by shortly after 6:00pm You have a little over a week to get your pitch in order to make a pitch as this will be occurring on March 22 at the Historic MVR.

Here’s how it works for those who pitch:

1) Before the event: Submit your idea to us on our site here. – you’ll actually hear back from us, no secret handshakes, no buddy, buddy shenanigans with us.

2) Register to Attend

3) We’ll schedule you to pitch at one of our events – and you better show up!

4) You pitch, get feedback on your idea, and maybe make a connection to help move your idea further. And we do this at night and we try to have 4 pitches during that time.

Here’s how it works for the audience:

1) Register to Attend

2) Give critical, but constructive feedback to the pitched business idea.

Sundown Rundown with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

A little about the Group who is sponsoring this event. SunDown Group has come a long way since it started offering business pitch events in Columbus in May of 2013. Our community has grown to over 1,350 individuals and our programs and services have expanded well beyond pitch events. We are helping entrepreneurs Connect, Do, Expand their businesses and Learn. Check out everything SunDown currently does to help out entrepreneurs everywhere.

This event is being held at the historic Casseses MVR on Walnut Street. This place is a landmark here in the Mahoning Valley. Started in 1927 by Carmine T. Cassese as a means of well, I am not sure exactly what they were doing there because I was not there. I could guess as 1927 was smack in the middle of the Prohibition Era in the United States and as soon as that failed experiment in representative democracy falied; MVR got one of the first Liquor Licenses in the State of Ohio.

Not that matters to me, but there is the possibility that Carmine was brewing up some fine beverages there at MVR. I know that we do not hear much about it these days, but there was a time when drinking was illegal. Can you imagine that? People having to break the law to drink?

Bootlegger Bust with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

Not only that, but there was quite a bit of drinking going on anyway. In fact, the term bootlegger was coined during this time. I am not alleging that anyone at MVR or anyone else did this. But, there were people here in the Valley who were so serious about getting drunk and getting other people drunk that according to Ohio History Central, “Many Ohio cities gained a reputation for lawlessness while Prohibition remained in effect. Toledo supposedly was a safe haven for mobsters and bootleggers from Chicago, Illinois, and Detroit, Michigan. Bootleggers from Kentucky smuggled alcohol into Cincinnati, Ohio, and then shipped the liquor to other communities in the state. It was rumored that law enforcement officials in Steubenville and Youngstown, Ohio, risked their very lives if they attempted to enforce Prohibition. Bootleggers did not exist only in Ohio.” That is a serious commitment to getting drunk there.

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Idora Park was created as a result of a Street Car Company wanting to expand their business and get more riders on the weekends and in the evening. According to Rick Shale writing for the Mahoning Valley Historical Society, “In the mid-1890s streetcar companies across America looked for ways to increase ridership in the evenings and on the weekends when the regular commuter traffic slacked off. Locally, the Youngstown Park & Falls Street Railway Company held the franchise for routes south of the Mahoning River, and it decided to build an amusement park in the largely undeveloped south side of Youngstown.

Idora Park (for its first season known as Terminal Park) opened on Decoration Day, May 30, 1899, and was an immediate success. Ideally located adjacent to Mill Creek Park and sufficiently far from the smoke and dirt of the mills that lined the Mahoning River, the new park was about 3.5 miles from Youngstown’s Central Square—far enough to convince most people to pay a nickel and ride the streetcar to the park rather than walk.

Back Wabbit at Idora Park

In 1902 Idora Park built its first roller coaster, a figure-eight toboggan slide, the first of three coasters constructed in approximately the same location on the western edge of the park. This coaster would be replaced by the Firefly in the 1920s and then by the famous Wildcat. In 1914 a second coaster, the Dip-the-Dips, built by the T. M. Harton Company of Pittsburgh, opened in the park’s southeast corner. It would be remodeled in the mid-1920s and renamed the Jack Rabbit.

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Music of all types played a significant role in Idora Park’s history, and the park’s success was due in part to its policy of booking top attractions. John Philip Sousa played at Idora in 1918, and by the end of the Big Band era of the 1930s to the 1950s, virtually every significant dance orchestra in America had played at Idora Park including Cab Calloway, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, and Guy Lombardo.

In the 1950s and 1960s tastes shifted from Big Band to rock and roll. Dan Ryan of WBBW radio introduced record hops to Idora in 1953. Live music was not abandoned, however, and the park continued to book national acts such as the Eagles, Monkees, Bobby Rydell, Bobby Sherman, and many others. Polka bands also drew huge crowds to Idora.

Youngstownbaseball at Idora Park

Sports were popular attractions at Idora, especially in the 1920s when Major League teams would play exhibition games there. The Cleveland Indians and Pittsburgh Pirates played at Idora as did the Boston Red Sox, Brooklyn Dodgers, and many more. By 1920 Idora Park had the only fenced-in ball field in Youngstown, and the city’s premier semi-pro team, the McElroys, used Idora as their home field. In July 1920 the legendary John McGraw brought his New York Giants to Idora. Though the New York lineup included five future members of baseball’s Hall of Fame, the McElroys won 8-2 marking the first time a local team had ever defeated a major league club.

By the 1960s most visitors to Idora Park were teenagers, not families, and several changes reflected this new demographic. In 1967 Idora charged admission for the first time, inaugurating a Pay-One-Price policy that included unlimited rides for $2.50. The Rapids was re-themed as a jungle ride and renamed The Lost River, and the fun house became the Whacky Shack to reflect the psychedelic 1960s.

On April 26, 1984, a catastrophic fire destroyed Idora’s Lost River ride, part of the Wildcat, the park office, and most of the game booths on the lower midway. Despite the losses, the park opened on schedule for the 1984 season. But the loss of major attractions proved to be a fatal blow, and the owners announced that the 1984 season would be the last.”

Although the Park is long gone, the neighborhood still exists and the YNDC will be out there with volunteers cleaning up the Glenwood Ave this Saturday March 18. And of course they could use some help. Why not go ahead on click the link and let em know you can come out to help. And you can reminisce too about simpler times while you are there. Help us clean up Glenwood Avenue! We will be removing overgrowth and debris from vacant lots, cleaning up trash, shoveling sidewalks, and more! Meet at YNDC Office, 820 Canfield Road. Parking available around the corner at 822 Billingsgate Avenue.

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Meals on Wheels PSA with Mario Andretti. Head on over to their page and give em a like, then get in touch by calling 330-744-3583 and do lunch with some of our treasured seniors here in the Mahoning Valley.

The Fowler Market Spring Fling with Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Fowler Market will be holding it’s Spring Fling on Saturday and Sunday. We will be hosting a two day “Spring Fling” vendor event with TONS of local handmade crafters, homemade edibles like chocolates, breads, jams & jellies, and much more!

Break that cabin fever and come join us with all of your favorite local vendors! There will also be a Chinese Auction, 50/50 drawing, and of course our weekly Queen of Hearts drawing – plenty of chances to win some unique goodies and a little extra spending money!

Tickets for the drawings will be sold on both Saturday and Sunday, but drawings will not take place until Sunday. Winners need not be present to win!

Donna from Wooden Barn Shop will be hosting a Sip & Build from 12:00-2:00 on BOTH days. Cost will be $40 with all materials provided and Builders may bring their own beverages to “Sip” (let’s stay within reason though, please! Remember, it’ll only be noon. Please RSVP to Donna at 330-442-1722 or message Wooden Barn Shop on Facebook.

Free Shoutouts with Mahoning Valley Podcast

This is the Mahoning Valley Podcast and it occurred to me that there a plenty of people here who may want to do a segment. Who may want to have their voice heard on a Podcast. Maybe you have an event or cause or just want to say hi to the Valley. This podcast was never meant to be all about me. It has been a work in progress. Well, it is your turn. If you want to record a segment and email it to me, I will consider adding it to an episode.

Because this is a community project, you must be a part of the Mahoning Valley or have some connection to the Valley. If you want to talk about your grandma or how you grew up in Struthers or what you favorite restaurant is, or favorite gym, or favorite bar, or favorite band or anything. It just needs to be about something or someone in the Mahoning Valley.

You may be thinking, how much is this going to cost me. Nothing. Nada. Just record on your phone. Record with your friends. Record on your laptop or tablet. Save the file as an MP3 and send it over. Send it over with any links or pictures you want to include. This is all about everyone here in the Valley. So give it a try. It is easy and free and will get your voice added to the Mahoning Valley Podcast Archive. Send as many as you want. Any topic. BUT, no bad language. I look forward to helping you be a part of the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

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Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 27

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Did you know that the Bee populations in this Region has been under attack? Not just in the Mahoning Valley but in many parts in the Country? Actually the world wide populations of “pollinators” has been spurring a resurgence in looking at ways that we as a community and a world can begin to preserve the natural benefits of pollination. A linchpin of the natural world.

According to GreenPeace, Since the late 1990s, beekeepers around the world have observed the mysterious and sudden disappearance of bees, and report unusually high rates of decline in honeybee colonies.

Bees make more than honey – they are key to food production because they pollinate crops. Bumblebees, other wild bees, and insects like butterflies, wasps, and flies all provide valuable pollination services. A third of the food that we eat depends on pollinating insects: vegetables like zucchini, fruits like apricot, nuts like almonds, spices like coriander, edible oils like canola, and many more… In Europe alone, the growth of over 4,000 vegetables depends on the essential work of pollinators. But currently, more and more bees are dying. The bee decline affects mankind too. Our lives depend on theirs.

Here in the Mahoning Valley, we have an Organization who is doing something about it this weekend. American Food Forest is going to be planting flowers in one of their Urban Farms on the Southside. Click the link to find out more and plan on going over there on Sunday afternoon from 12-3PM. It is on Idelwild Avenue in the 3400 Block. You can’t miss it.

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Rock and Roll will be used as a weapon against Cancer this weekend. Head on over to the The Embassy Banquet Centre on 5030 Youngstown Poland Rd in Boardman, Ohio 44514 on Saturday from 6:30 PM to 11PM for Generation Rock and The Acoustic Jones show that will benefit in part the American Cancer Society here in the Mahoning Valley. Make sure to bring 35 Dollarinos for your admission. And prepare to be rocked by some of the Veterans of the Rock and Roll Scene here in the Valley.

Saturday during the day, The Ohio Young Democrats hold their first meeting of 2017 to regroup after a rather staggering and surprising loss in the Presidential Election. Help them regroup at their first meeting.

Good agenda with local leaders. We’ll be meeting at the YWCA in Youngstown (25 W Rayen Ave, Youngstown OH 44503) on Saturday, February 25th at 11am.

11:00am: Welcome, Introductions, Overview of the Agenda

11:30am: Remarks from Mahoning County Democrats Chairman David Betras

11:35am: Remarks from Ohio Senate Minority Leader Senator Joe Schiavoni

11:45am: Q&A session with Leader Schiavoni

12:00pm: Issue Advocacy Presentation – How Things Work at the Statehouse (Ohio Senate Democrats staffers Bethany Sanders and Rachel Coyle)

1:00pm: Lunch (during lunch we will hear from YD candidates and office holders).

1:45pm: OYD Business / Local Chapter Updates

– OYD Convention update

– Issue advocacy survey results

– Chapter building update

– Campaigns update

– YDA Convention in August

– Board member and local chapter updates

2:30pm: Presentation Revitalizing a Rust Belt City – how young democrats can promote revitalization efforts, Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation Executive Director Ian Beniston

2:50pm: Closing Remarks

3:00pm: Adjourn

This meeting is open to all Young Democrats, you do not have to be a member of a chartered OYD Chapter to attend. Time to get involved in local politics? Here is your chance to get your feet wet.

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Meals on Wheels of Mahoning County PSA Get out and meet some people who need your help!

St Vincent de Paul is holding their Annual Fund-raising Banquet on Saturday as well. The proceeds will go to helping people here in the Valley who sincerely need the help and with your fifty dollars, you will be highly entertained.

This wonderful event will be held on the evening of February 25, 2017 at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Social Hall in Youngstown, Ohio. This annual event is a major fundraiser to support the Soup Kitchen & Food Pantry of the St. Vincent de Paul Society and other various charitable works completed for those in need throughout the year.

st-vincent-de-paul

This year’s event evening will begin at 6:00pm with Hors d’ourves and cocktails (Cash Bar is available) followed by Dinner at 7:00pm. Our Buffet Dinner will include Chicken Marsala, Pasta, Beef Tips, Italian Roasted Sausage, Salad and Dessert. Your ticket entitles you to the chance to win over $3,000 in cash prizes. The Grand Prize Winner (Need not be present) will take home $1,000.00. Additional winners of Bottles of Wine and Cash will be drawn randomly throughout the evening. A Chinese auction featuring Gift Baskets, Tickets, Sports Memorabilia, Art and many other exciting items will be available for your enjoyment. A 50/50 Raffle will also take place, along with other exciting events throughout the night. Live entertainment will be provided for musical entertainment throughout the entire evening. Tickets for this wonderful event are only $50.00 per person and will sell out fast, so order yours today!

Tickets can be ordered by calling our office at: (330) 333-3601

Maybe you don’t want to meet the Young Democrats of Ohio on Saturday. You can still get out there and do some good for our Valley at the Youngstown CityScape Cleanup Work Day.

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Join us this Saturday, February 25th from 10am-12pm for this month’s Downtown Youngstown Volunteer Workday. Volunteers will do a clean up of the Mahoning Commons area and finish installing fence line mural pieces at WRTA. This is a family-friendly event. All materials plus refreshments provided. Volunteers are asked to meet at the WRTA mural (604 Mahoning Ave) at 10am.

Please click the link above and let them know you are going to be there so they can plan on sufficient refreshments.

Interested in some history and learning in a phenomenal setting? Head on over to the Ward Beecher Planetarium on Saturday between 8-9PM. Natural Selection will be showing.

We will join Darwin on his voyage with the HMS Beagle to the Galapagos Islands where he was inspired to develop his later theory of transmutation by natural selection.

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From the comfort of Down House in Kent, Darwin himself will explain the mechanism of natural selection to the audience, and support it by showing many beautiful examples in nature. The thrill of a scientific discovery, the adventure of science and the beauty of nature are central in this show. This program is a joint presentation of YSU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Department of Biology. For more information on how to get here, or other programs throughout the year, please visit http://wbplanetarium.org We look forward to your visit! For a preview of this show, check this link on Youtube.

Want to know more about Art? Well the Butler Institute of American Art wants to teach you. Sunday from 2-3PM

Join Butler Art Director Dr. Louis Zona for the second in a series of five lectures in A Butler Director’s Art Lecture Series-Winter 2017

MY FAVORITE THINGS

These free lectures are presented at 2:00 pm Sundays in Zona Auditorium on the first floor of the Butler’s Beecher Center. Seating is limited.

In this lecture series, Dr. Zona discusses a wide range of works of art including:

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Leonardo’s Mona Lisa

Rembrandt’s Night Watch

Cezanne’s Mont Sainte Victoire and The Large Bathers

Van Gogh’s Sun Flowers

Gauguin’s Vision After The Sermon and The Yellow Christ

Monet’s Impressions Sunrise

Matisse’s The Dance

Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’ Avignon and Guernica

Wassily Kandinsky’s Painting (Autumn)

Marcel Duchamp’s The Fountain

Grant Wood’s American Gothic and Daughters of Revolution

Edward Hopper’s Early Summer Morning

Jackson Pollock’s Blue Poles

Mondrian’s Broadway Boogie Woogie

Giorgio DeChirico’s The Soothsayers Recompense

Salvador Dali’s Temptations of Saint Anthony

Willem de Kooning’s Woman 1

William Baziotes’ Dusk

Pierre Soulages’ Ceramic Wall

Jean Dubuffet The Gypsy

Helen Frankenthaler’s Interior Landscape

Robert Rauschenberg’s Retroactive II

Jasper Johns’ Flag and Target with Four Faces

The rest of the lectures in the series are scheduled for March 5, March 12 and April 9

Did you know that podcasts present an incredible opportunity for you to raise awareness about your organization and cause? About your personal brand? They do. Take for instance this Public Service Announcement that I created with conjunction with the Wild Earth Guardians.

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Our national forests are a treasure. A place of serenity and peacefulness that is restoring to the mind, soul and body. Our children deserve to have the opportunity to enjoy these pristine places in all their glory.

But the sounds of nature are under threat. If we don’t act today, the only sounds that we and our children may be able to hear are the sounds of 4 wheel drive trucks and diesel engines. The peace of the forest will turn into a nightmarish rush hour of loud motorcycles and dump trucks.

You have the power to preserve the peace. With just a few moments of your time, you can let the Forest Management Personnel know that you value the sounds of nature. And how important it is for all of us to have places where we can relax and enjoy nature’s wonderful symphony.

At the Helena Lewis and Clark National Forest, the future of these forests are under scrutiny. Currently the National Forest Service is accepting Public Comments on how this national gem will be managed going into the future. These public comments will be taken into consideration when any of our Public Land Management Plans are up for revision.

Your voice can make all the difference in how our Public Lands sound. Please take a few minutes to let our Official know that you value the sounds of nature.

To make your voice heard via fax, send your comments to 406-449-5436.

To make your voice heard via email, please visit https://goo.gl/ugoyve

Get involved with Wild Earth Guardians at www.wildearthguardians.org

Let’s keep the sounds of nature for future generations. Get started right now.

Now that they have an Audio PSA, they can request that it be played on any number of podcasts with just a little research and some requests. Here at the Mahoning Valley Podcast, I help organizations, brands and individuals do the same thing. Contact me and we will get started today.

Episode 17 of the Mahoning Valley Podcast

Please listen or download this episode here. You can also subscribe from this link.

Show Summary: Ohio Posts Record Year for New Business Formation. Harlem Globetrotters Tall Enough to Install Smoke Detectors. Austintown School Counselor Recognized by The First Lady. Idora Neighborhood Workday. McDonough Museum of Arts Receptions. Pet Look-a-Like Contest Starts Friday.

According to the Business Journal, Business formation in Ohio saw a seventh consecutive record-breaking year in 2016, Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted reported. Last year, 105,009 new filings were made with the secretary of state’s office, up from the 97,746 new businesses that filed in 2015, setting the previous record.

“We are offering better services to entrepreneurs at a lower cost and as a result, more are choosing Ohio for their new business than ever before,” Husted said in a news release announcing the 2016 results.

Making it simpler and less costly to do business in Ohio has been a top priority for Husted since taking office in 2011, according to the release. Initiatives toward that goal include the launch of Ohio Business Central, which enables Ohio-based businesses to form and renew their business status online; establishing a partnership with Google’s “Let’s Get Our Cities on the Map” program to put additional tools in the hands of new and growing Ohio businesses; and partnering with the Cleveland Sight Center to reduce wait time for callers into the Business Services Call Center.

The initiatives have enabled Husted to reduce spending in his office by $14.5 million in his first term when compared to the previous administration, he reported. In his second term, he requested a cut, not an increase, in his budget, and last December he requested a 100% cut in General Revenue Funds for the next biennium while announcing his plan to run the office for the remainder of his term without the use of taxpayer funds.

This is the sort of thing that deserves recognition. Growing opportunity without growing cost. I figure that anytime anyone can figure out a way to increase opportunities for the Mahoning Valley without asking for more money to do it, they deserve some props. So well done, Mr Husted. And Thanks.

According to WKBN, A Harlem Globetrotter helped the American Red Cross install free smoke detectors in Youngstown homes on Wednesday. To prevent fire tragedies, the Red Cross is working to set up free smoke detectors in homes across northeast Ohio.

On Monday, volunteers installed 61 smoke detectors as part of the Red Cross’ Home Fire Campaign. Volunteers were back at the life-saving project again on Wednesday. Most of the time, a volunteer needs a ladder to install a smoke detector, but not Zeus McClurkin. The Harlem Globetrotter is 6’8″.

He said the Globetrotters partnered with the Red Cross for this project. “We’re doing an amazing initiative trying to help install some smoke detectors to underprivileged areas in the city. One thing that we’re going to be doing is replacing old smoke detectors and giving people free, new smoke detectors.”

He installed smoke detectors in two homes Wednesday afternoon. At one of the stops, he and the Red Cross installed three brand new smoke detectors for a man on the east side of Youngstown.

McClurkin said he’s happy to be part of such a great program.

“There are actually three home fires in northeast Ohio every night and we’re hoping to make that number go down every day,” he said. “Hopefully, we can do that with these free smoke detectors that we’re installing.”

But it wasn’t all work for McClurkin. He showed off some of his Globetrotter moves and even had a homeowner join in. The smoke detector program is ongoing. For more information on how to get a smoke alarm or volunteer with the program, visit the Red Cross’ website. Volunteers work about three to four hours a week to install them.

FEMA PSA

According to the Vindicator, Austintown Elementary School counselor Kelley Mills was among the school counselors from across the country who stood onstage with the First Lady during her final speech in that position.

Mills was in Washington, D.C., to be recognized as the 2017 Counselor of the Year State Representative for Ohio after being selected as Ohio’s Elementary School Counselor of the Year and overall School Counselor of the Year.

Education has been a centerpiece of the first lady’s agenda during her eight years in the White House. In her final speech, she talked about her “Reach Higher” initiative, which launched in 2014.

“Now, when we first came up with this idea, we had one clear goal in mind: We wanted to make higher education cool. We wanted to change the conversation around what it means and what it takes to be a success in this country,” Obama said. “Because let’s be honest, if we’re always shining the spotlight on professional athletes or recording artists or Hollywood celebrities, if those are the only achievements we celebrate, then why would we ever think kids would see college as a priority? So we decided to flip the script and shine a big, bright spotlight on all things educational.”

Obama credited school counselors such as Mills with helping to make her initiative a success.

“And we know that school counselors like all of the folks standing with me on this stage have played a critical role in helping us get there,” she said. “So our school counselors are truly among the heroes of the ‘Reach Higher’ story. And that’s why we created this event two years ago, because we thought that they should finally get some recognition. We wanted everyone to know about the difference that these phenomenal men and women have been making in the lives of our young people every day.”

Obama went on to tell the assembled counselors, “You see the promise in each of your students. You believe in them even when they can’t believe in themselves, and you work tirelessly to help them be who they were truly meant to be. … These men and women show them that those kids matter; that they have something to offer; that no matter where they’re from or how much money their parents have, no matter what they look like or who they love or how they worship or what language they speak at home, they have a place in this country.

“And as I end my time in the White House, I can think of no better message to send our young people in my last official remarks as first lady,” she said.

The experience was inspiring and rejuvenating, Mills said. “I thought it was really powerful, and I was really excited because the little ones at Austintown Elementary live-streamed her message, so they were able to see me as well as hear her message,” she said. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime thing for me – for anyone, really.” Well done Ms Mills and congratulations.

Saturday January 21, 2017 Join the YNDC for a day of cleaning up and working in the Idora Neghborhood of Youngstown. Meet at YNDC Office, 820 Canfield Road. Parking available around the corner at 822 Billingsgate Avenue.

McDonough Museum of Art Events,

Selections from the collection of the Richard M. Ross Art Museum, Ohio Wesleyan University

January 20-March 3, 2017 Public Reception, Friday, January 20, 6-8pm

The permanent collection at the Ross Art Museum consists of more than 2,500 works of art including American and European prints, drawings, photographs, paintings and sculpture. Artists featured in the exhibition include Elliot Erwitt, Joel Meyerowitz, Alen MacWeeney and Frank Stella. We are grateful to the exhibition sponsors Dr. Albert and Suzanne Cinelli for introducing us to the Ross and its outstanding staff.

Alex Webb: La Calle, Photographs from Mexico

January 20-March 3, 2017

Public Reception, Friday, January 20, 6-8pm

An elusive presence identified as “no one” wanders, strays, gets lost, and finds itself again in the poem “La Calle” (The Street) by Octavio Paz, which is set in a silent, desolate territory bordering the world of sleep, where dreamlike street corners always lead to the same place. It is from this extraordinary literary work that photographer Alex Webb (born in San Francisco, 1952) took the title for his compendium of street photographs of Mexico, which he’s taken over three decades. However, the street that appears in Webb’s images, in contrast to Paz’s, is an often crowded, vibrant, ever-changing place, where “no one” becomes a metaphor for the precarious, the chaotic, the multitudinous.

First in black and white (1975–78) and then in color (1978–2007), Webb has documented the multicultural, syncretic, lively, overcharged, and at times turbulent reality of a nation that during this period has known all sorts of political and economic crises, but has also offered ample evidence of its capabilities for resistance and survival, despite the relentless pressure of threats and tragedies, most recently the ferocious violence caused by the growth of organized crime and the government’s erratic fight against it.

The Business Journal will be sponsoring it’s annual Pet Look A Like Contest starting January 20. Valentine’s Day is a celebration of love between people, but there are plenty of kinds of love in the world. That’s why The Business Journal is celebrating furry, four-legged friends in our newest contest.

The Pet Look-Alike photo contest wants to see who loves their pet so much that they actually look like each other!

Beginning Friday, The Business Journal will hold a photo contest on their Facebook page to see who loves their pet the most. The contest closes Feb. 19, with the winner announced on National Love Your Pet Day, Feb. 20.

Entries are limited to one picture per email address. Voting is limited to one vote per Facebook user per day. The Business Journal reserves the right to remove submitted pictures that are inappropriate.

WWF PSA

Episode 15 Transcript for the Mahoning Valley Podcast

Listen to and support this project here.

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Meet the New Police Dog. Sports with Western Reserve Radio. Honoring the Memory of Martin.

According to the Vindicator, A newly-acquired police dog will be introduced to the community at Saturday’s 7:05 p.m. Youngstown Phantoms hockey game at the Covelli Centre against the Sioux City Musketeers. The Youngstown Phantoms are assisting the Mahoning County Sheriff’s Office in raising money for the training and care of the 2 1/2-year-old Dutch Shepherd named Phantom.

The Fraternal Order of Police will be selling raffle tickets for various prizes at the game, with proceeds to be used toward the costs associated with the dog. Phantom and his handler will be introduced to the community between periods of the game. Saturday is Free Youth Jersey Night for the first 750 young people attending the game.

So used to be afraid of Police Dogs. Well, German Shepherds anyway. When I was growing up in Pittsburgh; I had a morning paper route. I walked about 3 miles every morning no matter the weather and delivered papers. It was the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Most days, it was pretty light duty; but back then they also had the Sunday Paper. So 7 days a week, I was out there usually before sunrise delivering the News for my neighbors.

There was one house that had a German Shepherd. And most days it was in the house. But it did not like me walking up to the porch and dropping off that paper. Not at all. In fact, I think it was able to smell me. Sometimes, it would start making a ruckus before I even got there. And it was scary. It was a big dog and it barked loud. And it barked at me.

One morning for whatever reason, the owners left it out on the porch and it was untied. I started coming down the road towards the house and it started barking. And I saw it on the porch. I start thinking, there aint no way they are getting their paper today. As I got closer to the house, with the full intent on walking right by, it started coming off the porch and down the yard at me.

I nearly fouled my jeans. It was running up to me and I was scared. Seriously scared, thinking I was about to become dog chow. I stood there. Cause I knew there was no way I was outrunning this thing. So I start thinking, if I survive this; I am going to sue the pants off these people. It keeps coming, and I stand there frozen. Getting ready to try to beat it off me with my paper carrying sack.

It runs up to me and sniffs. It starts sniffing at my junk and legs. I am standing there waiting for it to take a chunk out of me. It keeps sniffing and then I slowly put my hand out palm up so it can smell my hand. He/she keeps sniffing and I start to pet it a little under the neck. I keep scratching and it starts to wag its tail a little. I start patting it on the head and it starts rubbing up against me a little. As it turns out, it was nice big dog who just wanted some attention.

Moral of the story. Sometimes the thing we are afraid of is the best thing for us. Sometimes we have to stand still and face our fears and hope for the best. That big ole dog was out a few more mornings, but those people always got their paper. Because I had a job to do. And their dog was a big puppy at heart. And now I was his friend.

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On Monday, we as a community and nation honor the memory of one of our great civil rights leaders. A man who was assassinated for his beliefs and commitment to equality. A man who was honored during his life and also after his death. And is still considered to be a beacon of light in a dark time in American History. When people refused to allow the fundamental values that our Constitution espoused. A time when for whatever reason, men and women had yet to see the fact that our Bill of Rights applied equally to all members of our society and citizens of these United States of America.

I will get to naming him momentarily, but not before I rant about the grievous evil that many people held so fast to. By now most of us know who I am talking about anyway. But this man had cajones and conviction. I think he had an understanding that his mission would likely lead to his demise. We never know when any of us are out of time, and he may not have been expecting to die on that fateful day when evil finally had it’s moment. What evil never knows in the moment is that it all works together for a greater good. That is why good always triumphs over evil. Because the greater good can use evil’s work to bring a greater good about. And that without evil never knowing it is coming.

This man though; I think he knew it may come someday. His assassination that is. He knew that he was causing narrow minded and selfishly blinded people to feel as if they were being encroached upon. He surely knew that in speaking out against wickedness, it would look for some way to get him back.

Yet, he was unafraid. He was stalwart. He was bold and spoke the truth that he knew. Because someone had to do it. Someone had to speak for those who had no voice. And this man that I speak of did exactly this. He took to the streets and told the truth. He took to the airwaves and told the truth. He would speak the truth whenever given the opportunity knowing full well that eventually it would be the reason that some sad lost soul would use to justify killing him.

So Monday January 16, we honor this man of courage and faith. Martin Luther King Jr. We are still honoring his memory despite the fact that he was killed nearly 40 years ago. And not only will we honor his memory but people will go out and do good things in his memory. That is a legacy. When people remember what you did and are still inspired to go out and do good.

The YNDC, one of my favorite non profits here in the Mahoning Valley will be working with one of our local communities of faith to get out into the streets of Youngstown and do some work. And I for one applaud the good work that these nice people are doing. Because in many ways, the YNDC and Family Life Ministries are exemplifying what I consider to be a good thing. Following the example of Mr King. Getting out into the streets and cleaning things up.

It is easy for me to sit in this nice comfortable makeshift recording studio and talk ab0ut doing things to help our community. I admit it. It is easy for me to do it. Don’t get me wrong, there is a bunch of work that goes into podcasting. But for me it is pleasant and easy work. Enjoyable even. Part of that may be because as most people who know me would tell you, I love to hear myself talk. I admit that too. I love the sound of my own voice.

But there is one thing that many people may not understand about a project like this. Not everyone likes what I have to say all the time. Sometimes, I am boring and preachy. Sometimes I may point my finger at someone I think is a sucky waste of space as a means of showing all of us what a bad example is or to show that to do wrong has consequences. Like in one of my earlier episodes I referred to some local officials as excrement. I was wrong. Even the most wretched sinners are still people too. And although I am glad they finally decided to give up and go home when their ringleader was indicted; I still could have been less derogatory and more respectful of their humanity. For that I am sorry and want to assure my listeners that it will never happen again.

So I am not going to cry about how much hard work it is to do these podcasts Because I do them by choice. But I am going to ask you to help me to continue to showcase the good things here in this Valley. For much the same reason that MLK Jr spoke out in his day. Because someone has to do it. Someone needs to focus on the good around here. We all know that this valley has a lot of good stuff going on all the time. Yes, we have problems. I have problems. But one thing that many of us can agree characterizes the Mahoning Valley and most of our citizens here is that just because there is a problem we don’t just tuck our tails between our legs and scamper off. We stand up for what is right and do what is right in many cases.

You, if you have been following this project have a heart to do what is good. And you want to hear about what is good here. And you know the value of telling people what is good here. And that it is important work that someone has to do. So partner with me and sponsor this project. It will be worth your while. I will make sure of it. Click on this link and make a commitment. If you have a non profit, I will make it worth your while. If you are an individual, I will give you credit if you want. If you want to remain anonymous and just do something to help our Valley; I will keep discretion and make it our secret. If you are a business owner or someone who is responsible for digital communications, take the idea to your boss if need be and get the money to keep these coming.

I am going to keep at it either way. I am not going anywhere. I am in it for the long run so join me and send some money to participate. Invest in our Valley and our community and we will make it better together. Thanks.

Mahoning Valley Podcast Transcript Episode 10 for December 27 2016

Listen here.

Transcript 12-27-16

Shepherd of the Valley Plans New Campus in Liberty, YNDC Lots of Green Program, Free Christmas Dinner in Warren draws hundreds, Game of Hope Family Fest, Bike Racks that are also Art in Warren, Bracelet Sales to Support Emergency Assistance to Local Persons in need, YSU Football Team plans Meet and Greet, and Akron Childrens Hospital recognized for Innovative Patient Experience Award.

According to the Vindicator An upcoming facility for the elderly by Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Retirement Services is expected to create 200 local jobs. Liberty Township trustees last month approved a zoning change for the project, which is on Tibbetts-Wick Road. The venture, which is expected to cost between $26 million and $31 million, is set for completion in spring 2018.

The complex will include between 50 and 80 assisted living units, a 79-bed nursing home, a rehabilitation facility, a wellness facility and a facility for those living with Alzheimer’s disease. The 55-acre complex includes close to 44 acres of green space. Shepherd of the Valley also has locations in Boardman, Howland, Poland and Niles. “It’s a big deal not only for our community, but also for surrounding communities because all around here people are aging,” said township Trustee Jodi Stoyak of the Liberty location. “It’s going to be a phenomenal facility.”

And this a good thing for a couple of reasons. Jobs. If there is one thing we need more of here in the Mahoning Valley it is good jobs that pay a living wage. Few things can drive community development like a well employed work force. But there is more good coming out of this plan. The preservation of Green Space within the development plan. I am all for economic development but when planners ignore the necessity of Green Space within the plan they are dropping the ball. Where there are plants there is oxygen and where there are plants there is the reduction of CO2. Although many people wonder if reducing CO2 is an important part of living sustainably, I am here to attest to the fact that anything you can do to reduce your carbon footprint or preserve green space personally or corporately is not only intelligent and forward thinking it is ecologically responsible.

Speaking of Green Spaces, one of the most active and prolific organizations in the area of Community Development runs a great program right here in Mahoning County. The YNDC (Youngstown Community Development Corporation runs a program called Lots of Green.

According to their website, Lots of Green, the YNDC’s vacant land reuse program, seeks to repurpose all land in a target area, transforming the physical fabric of strategic neighborhoods. These lots are converted to community gardens, native planting sites, pocket parks, small community orchards, a 1.5 acre urban farm and training center, and side yard expansions. All of these strategies for vacant land reuse serve to both improve quality of life for residents and demonstrate best practices for neighborhood projects across the city. The YNDC has established 6 community gardens on vacant land, which provide space for neighborhoods residents, primarily low-income individuals and seniors, to produce fresh foods to feed their families. Vacant land reuse at scale also reinforces our homeownership strategies, fostering a sense of ownership and confidence for new investors in the neighborhood.

According to the Vindicator quite a few people showed up for a Free Christmas Dinner at Aulizio’s Banquet Center in Warren. Hundreds experienced the warmth of the 28th annual Families Helping Families Christmas Day Dinner on Sunday. Some came alone, while others brought the whole family to experience what Christmas is all about: caring about people and sharing the warmth of the holiday together — whether you are strangers or not.

“I have been coming about 15 years,” said Barbara Strother of Warren. “When I first started coming, I did some volunteer work. I liked to help out those who are less fortunate than I am because that’s what Christmas is all about. This time, I came out with my friends to spend time with them. It’s a great blessing to me that I get to sit here with my very best friends.”

The dimly-lit banquet hall gave off a romantic feeling that was enhanced by the sound of a soft flute playing in the background and Santa’s jolly laugh. Children ran around showing off new toys they received from Santa as a balloon maker made balloon animals and passed them out, offering lessons to anyone who wanted them. The hall felt homey.

Around the corner from the main dining and fellowship area were steaming dishes with smiling volunteers scooping the offerings up for guests. On the menu: ham, turkey, green beans, corn, mashed potatoes and stuffing. Dunkin’ Donuts, Piccadilly Parlour, Perkins Restaurant and Bakery and Panera Bread all donated to the seemingly never-ending dessert table.

“It’s like clockwork anymore,” said Dan Polivka, Trumbull County Commissioner, of organizing the event. “We have so many good volunteers. They know their job each year.”

And this touches on an ongoing theme of my podcasts. That it is in giving that we become the people we have the potential to be. That goes for organizations and for individuals. I know it seems to be something that we talk a lot about around the holidays, but the truth is that the holidays are a great reason to remind people that giving is a basic function of living in civilized society, but it is a year round attitude of looking for reasons to give and finding ways of giving that brings out the humanity in all of us. It is true that when we give to others, we do receive back. But sometimes we do not get anything back from those we give, but there is always a benefit to giving to each other.

GOT GAME? Want to Play in the Game of Hope Family Fun Fest?

If you do, or even think you do, it’s time to sign up to get on the roster for the biggest charity basketball game of the season, The Hope Foundation’s Game of Hope Family Fun Fest being held on Saturday, February 11, 2017 at YSU’s Beeghly Center.

The Hope Foundation of Mahoning Valley asks that each participant that is selected makes a goal to raise at least $300 through donations, side events, ticket sales, or any other means.

Here’s your chance to hit the court with local celebrities and a number of surprise, big-name ‘walk-ons’ to help raise money for our region’s chronically and terminally ill children.

To get on a team, Click Here to Fill out the Information Form. Space is limited and registration closes QUICKLY so reserve your spot today! With the RETURN of the Game of Hope, the effect will be that everyone is in this together will raise money for chronically/terminally ill children.

According to their website, The Hope Foundation of the Mahoning Valley (H.F.M.V.) a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization, was founded in 2007 after the increasing success and popularity of the Game of Hope Charity Basketball Classic. Unpaid staff, volunteers and supporting individuals and organizations are committed to our mission. We improve the quality of life for our community’s chronically and terminally ill children and their families through charitable support. With money raised from donations and our signature fundraisers The Foundation provides grants up to $5,000. For more information about The Foundation please visit the website at www.HopeMV.org.

According to the Tribune Chronicle Warren has commissioned some artwork that will also serve a public purpose; Bike Racks. It wasn’t bicycle weather as Doug Meyer and Carl Henneman worked to install the first of four bike racks that will double as public art projects in the city. Meyer, a metal artist who lives in Warren and has a workshop in Garrettsville, had to shovel away snow before securing the 12-foot long sculpture made from 1-inch tubular steel outside Trumbull Family Fitness near the corner of High Street NW and Mahoning Avenue NW.

He was commissioned by Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership, which received a $4,000 grant from the Ohio Arts Council to finance four dual-purpose pieces that would be both functional and artistic. “I’m familiar with Doug’s work,”said Henneman, who is working with TNP through AmeriCorps VISTA, a federal program that works with communities to overcome poverty. “He was one of the first artists who came to mind, and I contacted him to get a proposal in. He made a scale model of this, and it blew everyone away.”

“He was really good to do first, because he’s done this kind of work a lot and on a pretty big level. He has his own workshop. I just knew he could do it and pull it off,” Henneman said.

This is the kind of project that everyone in this Valley should support rigorously. Arts are one of the important activities that everyone benefits from. The Artists benefit from the fulfillment of creating. The patrons benefit from setting an example for generations upcoming. And the public benefits from the exposure to the different perspectives and opinions so as to help all of us understand that although we are all individuals, we all have more in common then we have differences.

Bracelet sales to support Emergency Assistance programs throughout the Diocese.

When you purchase a bracelet in support of our Emergency Assistance Program, you will be providing help, and creating hope to a family in need. Without the continuous support of our community our doors would close, and we would be forced to turn away those in critical need. Without you, we are nothing.

Our Emergency Assistance Programs combine material and financial assistance with advocacy efforts for people in need of food, shelter, clothing, transportation, utility payments, homeless outreach and other services essential to well-being.

Extending help and hope in times of crisis and need to families and children is a vital part of Catholic Charities mission and identity.

Won’t you please join us to support our neighbors and friends of the Diocese? 

Catholic Charities served 10,693 children through the Emergency Assistance Program in 2015.  We also assisted 754 people in finding shelter/homes in 2015 to prevent homelessness.  Thank you for your continued support.

According to Youngstown State University, The 2016 NCAA Division I-FCS National Finalist Youngstown State football team will have a meet and greet prior to the men’s basketball game against Milwaukee on Thursday, Dec. 29, at 6 p.m., the YSU Athletics Department announced.

The student-athletes will greet fans, take pictures and sign autographs before the game in the general admission section on the West side of the Beeghly Center. Fans can also participate in the Rulli Bros. “Holiday Hoops” promotion for December where fans can receive a buy one, get one free offer on general admission tickets by asking for the “Holiday Hoops” special upon ordering their tickets. The Penguins face James Madison in the national championship game on Saturday, Jan. 7, at Noon Eastern. It marks Youngstown State’s seventh appearance in the national title game.

Although many people may not give much thought to this, supporting college sports through attending the games helps to defray the costs of running the entire College. So when you go out to see a basketball game or a football game or any YSU sporting event, you are helping to keep the cost of a higher education down for all students. So get on out there and cheer for our student athletes.

Although this happened last month, I think it is important to recognize one of the premiere children health facilities in the nation. Akron Children’s Hospital was recognized for Innovative Patient Experience. According to their website, Akron Children’s has been recognized by Becker’s Hospital Review, a leading source of cutting-edge healthcare news, as one of 50 hospitals nationwide with innovative patient experience programs.

According to Becker’s, “The hospitals and health systems on this list are among those committed to keeping up with – or getting ahead of – the pace of change in healthcare by forming dedicated centers and institutes for innovation.” One of the ways the hospital’s patient experience program is innovative is in its approach, which the center’s director, Stefan Agamanolis, PhD, refers to as human-centered design.

“An increasing body of research illustrates how delivering a positive experience in healthcare can improve medical outcomes,” Agamanolis said. “For example, reducing stress and anxiety strengthens the immune system, which in turn impacts infection and recovery rates. If an institution is to fully embody a mission to solve medical problems and improve health, it cannot merely provide a technical service – it must also be able to deliver thoughts and feelings in the same way any other business working with human beings must do so.”

The Akron Children’s Hospital Foundation works to ensure that the hospital can continue to uphold its three promises: treat each other the way we’d want to be treated; treat each child as if he was our own; and turn no child away because of a family’s inability to pay.

Your financial and in-kind donations help support our mission, and we’re grateful for your support. Each gift, regardless of its size, makes a difference in the patients we care for every day.