Mahoning Valley Podcast Andrea Wood Interview Episode 37

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AW Portrait

Today we are talking with Andrea Wood the Publisher of the Business Journal Daily here in Youngstown. Thanks for granting me an interview today Ms Wood.

I understand you were a resident of Poland for a while. Please tell me about your favorite place in the Mahoning Valley.

The Central YMCA in Youngstown

The Central YMCA Youngstown Facebook Page

The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley

2:35 I also understand that you and I have in common growing up in the Pittsburgh Area. I went to Central Catholic in Oakland, and you went to Fox Chapel High. Although it is not directly related to the Mahoning Valley, what was your favorite activity in High School?

Pure as the Driven Snow a Melodrama on Amazon

4:05 You started working in Youngstown for one of our local TV Stations WYTV Channel 33 as an investigative reporter and was promoted to chief anchor and executive producer. How did that come about? Moving to Youngstown?

Tokyo House

Affirmative Action

Michael Moliterno

Stacia Erdos

Tokyo House

11:04 What would you tell young people who are just starting out is the most important thing to remember when striving to succeed?

Youngstown Flea

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation on Twitter

Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership on Facebook.

The Youngstown Flea

First Youngstown Flea in April on Facebook

14:43 As an investigative reporter, you must have come across some stories that may have put your life in danger, what do you think was the most dangerous story you have reported on? And why do you feel that way?

Joanne Elaine Coughlin Missing

16:45 Why did you decide to become a journalist? What was the impetus for that decision?

Penn State

Penn State

18:48 What was you inspiration to start the Business Journal Daily in 1984?

Meals on Wheels of Mahoning Valley Page on Facebook. Go ahead and give them a like.

21:10 Once you started the Journal, what was one of the things that you had to deal with that you never would have expected to happen?

22:09 Many people sometimes forget that people in the media have lives outside of the office. What is your favorite off hours activity?

Michael Dyson

Tears We Cannot Stop by Michael Dyson on Amazon

White Privilege

Kathy Miller Story on the Vindicator

Greg Iles Novels

25:08 I am sure you have met many very interesting people in your life, Who was the most interesting and why?

Dolly Parton

Dolly-Parton-in-the-1970s-442243

Dolly Parton benefit for Wildfire Victims.

27:52 If you could do anything tomorrow, anything at all; what would it be?

29:27 What do you most want to be remembered for after you are gone? Is there anything that you want people to think about when they hear your name?

33:24 Is there anything that you wanted to talk about today that I did not ask about?

Dwight Stickler

Easter Brunch at Kravitz in Fellows Riverside Garden

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 19

Please listen, download, subscribe or sign up for our Newsletter here.

The program “Curious Buckeyes: Lesser-Known Facts in Ohio History” will be presented by Jason R. Carruthers, of Kent State University, on Monday, January 30, 2017 beginning at 6:30pm in the library’s Quaker Room located at 821 E. State St., Salem, OH 44460. The program will discuss some of the lesser- known aspects of Ohio history, from its pre-colonial history, through the Civil War, the Space Race and into the modern era. Online registration at www.salem.lib.oh.us is required for this program that is free of cost to attend and open to the public.

Jason R. Carruthers is an adjunct instructor at Kent State University, where he is also a Ph.D. candidate in American History. A native of Wadsworth, Ohio, he holds a B.S. from Oklahoma Wesleyan University and a M.A. from the University of Akron.

For more information and assistance with registration, if needed, please call the library at 330-332-0042 or email to library@salem.lib.oh.us.

On Saturday, January 28 Come out to the Beaver Creek State Park for Trail Building between 9AM and 1PM. We will be finishing up the Upper Salamander trail, and we will be back at it to make 3 weekends in a row. Please help us to complete the Upper Salamander Trail this weekend so we can move on to Milton! For this event it will be best to park in the upper lot across from the Beaver Creek State Park campground on Leslie Road. It’s a shorter walk from that area. Come out from 9am to 1pm, or just come out for however much time you can spend with us! All efforts are appreciated. We have the tools! We’ll mostly be doing bench work this time around. Dress warm.

Friday and Saturday Open Auditions at the Youngstown Play House for the Musical “Hair Spray” Make sure to click the link in the show notes for more information.

AUDITION DATES: Friday, January 27,2017 at 6pm OR Saturday, January 28,2017 at 6pm (You do not need to attend both nights)

Callbacks on Sunday, January 29 (only if necessary) Please be on time and ready to dance.

WHO CAN AUDITION:

Everyone (15 and over, except for Little Inez who should be about 11). Please read below for more specific casting needs.

ETHNICITY & BODY TYPES:

A strong component of the Hairspray story revolves around race in the 1960’s, as well as specific body types and ages. It is our goal to have the following characteristics appear on the stage to forward the story:

Black/African‐American

White/Caucasian

Plus‐sized (Pleasantly plump!)

Notably slimmer than plus‐sized

Appear” means you naturally look the part – we will not be using make‐up to modify ethnicity or costuming to dramatically alter body type (except for Edna’s brassiere!). Several roles in the play do not call for a specific ethnicity or body type. The Youngstown Playhouse is an Equal Opportunity organization and encourages every one of all races and sizes to audition for age appropriate roles. Hairspray is fairly unique in its specificity for ethnicity and body type. Most of our productions are much less specific!

AUDITON PROCEDURES:

Sign in upon arrival. Please bring a headshot, or recent photograph, and a typed resume.

ALL auditioners are asked to prepare 32 bars of a 50’s or 60’s rock song (NOT from the show). An accompanist will be provided. Please make sure that your sheet music is in the correct key. You may use a CD of music only. ALL who audition will be expected to dance, please come prepared to move. Some auditioners will be asked to read from the script. If you have any questions send an email to youngstown_ph@att.net

Help us kickoff the 2017 membership campaign with a Chili Cookoff and Benefit Showcase on Saturday, January 28, 2017 from 5-6:30 PM at the Trumbull Ag Center.

Join us to learn about Farm Bureau accomplishments, and gather information on the benefits of being a Farm Bureau member, and how to get involved. Bringing friends and memberships (new or renewal) can win you prizes! If you are interested in entering your best pot of chili into the cookoff and/or having a table at the benefit showcase, please contact Marsha Stanhope at 330-240-1587 or call the office at 440-437-8700.

Event admission is free. Donations are encouraged. Donations will be given to the Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership’s Warren Farmers Market. Please RSVP by Wednesday, January 25th 2017 by calling 440.437.8700 or emailing nefarmbu@fairpoint.net

Farm Bureau membership is open to all Ohioans, including farmers, producers, young farmers, gardeners, food and wine enthusiasts and anyone who would like to support Ohio’s food and farming community. Learn more at http://growwithfb.org Head on over to their Facebook Page and give em a like too.

Meals on Wheels PSA

Black History Month Events Notices can be sent to the Vindicator by January 28. And after that, please send them to me for coverage and mention. To send to the Vindicator: The Vindicator will again run a listing of Black History Month activities through the month of February. The deadline to submit your information is Saturday, Jan. 28 for the Vindicator. Send the day, time, place of your event and if there is a cost to:

Black History Month Events, The Vindicator, P.O. Box 780, Youngstown, OH 44501

By email to news@vindy.com Put Black History Month Events in the subject line.

Questions: Call 330-747-1471, exts. 1489 or 1254.

You can also send them to me at mahoningvalleypodcast@consultant.com anytime after the Vindicator Deadline. Please send any links to the Sponsoring Organization’s Websites and Facebook Events so I can make sure to link to them on the show notes for the podcast episodes.

Our very own Youngstown Nighthawks will be playing on Saturday Night in Cortland. Very reasonable tickets are available for less then 12 bucks here.

The Youngstown Nighthawks are a semi-professional arena soccer team for the Northeast Ohio and PA West communities. The team is based in Youngstown, Ohio and competes in the Professional Arena Soccer League (PASL).The Nighthawks utilize the game of arena soccer to create an exciting, intimate atmosphere of affordable entertainment for the benefit of sports fans of all ages. The Nighthawks are an active community member and creates a unique opportunity for the promotion of community based programs and initiatives.

With a passion for the game of soccer and the backing of both Northeast Ohio and PA West soccer communities the Youngstown Nighthawks was founded in 2014 by Edward Holmes, Joshua Auden, and Chris Harrold. They have a goal to bring the indoor soccer game back into their local communities and provide an affordable, intimate and exciting entertainment experience.

Sunday January 29 from 12Pm to 2PM Help the Steel Valley Vineyard to prepare the installation of shelving in the 4 Greenhouses we have to fire up them up next month. We will have to slide the greenhouses over and take out inner pannels so the 2 pellet stoves wil circulate the heat inside of all 4 of the houses. The houses are very light, just awkward to move. Insulation Foam will go around each opening and the houses will be set back together and squared up. Head over to 3411 Idlewood Ave.

Grilled Chicken and Drinks provided.

AARP Caregiver PSA

Mahoning Valley Podcast Transcript Episode 10 for December 27 2016

Listen here.

Transcript 12-27-16

Shepherd of the Valley Plans New Campus in Liberty, YNDC Lots of Green Program, Free Christmas Dinner in Warren draws hundreds, Game of Hope Family Fest, Bike Racks that are also Art in Warren, Bracelet Sales to Support Emergency Assistance to Local Persons in need, YSU Football Team plans Meet and Greet, and Akron Childrens Hospital recognized for Innovative Patient Experience Award.

According to the Vindicator An upcoming facility for the elderly by Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Retirement Services is expected to create 200 local jobs. Liberty Township trustees last month approved a zoning change for the project, which is on Tibbetts-Wick Road. The venture, which is expected to cost between $26 million and $31 million, is set for completion in spring 2018.

The complex will include between 50 and 80 assisted living units, a 79-bed nursing home, a rehabilitation facility, a wellness facility and a facility for those living with Alzheimer’s disease. The 55-acre complex includes close to 44 acres of green space. Shepherd of the Valley also has locations in Boardman, Howland, Poland and Niles. “It’s a big deal not only for our community, but also for surrounding communities because all around here people are aging,” said township Trustee Jodi Stoyak of the Liberty location. “It’s going to be a phenomenal facility.”

And this a good thing for a couple of reasons. Jobs. If there is one thing we need more of here in the Mahoning Valley it is good jobs that pay a living wage. Few things can drive community development like a well employed work force. But there is more good coming out of this plan. The preservation of Green Space within the development plan. I am all for economic development but when planners ignore the necessity of Green Space within the plan they are dropping the ball. Where there are plants there is oxygen and where there are plants there is the reduction of CO2. Although many people wonder if reducing CO2 is an important part of living sustainably, I am here to attest to the fact that anything you can do to reduce your carbon footprint or preserve green space personally or corporately is not only intelligent and forward thinking it is ecologically responsible.

Speaking of Green Spaces, one of the most active and prolific organizations in the area of Community Development runs a great program right here in Mahoning County. The YNDC (Youngstown Community Development Corporation runs a program called Lots of Green.

According to their website, Lots of Green, the YNDC’s vacant land reuse program, seeks to repurpose all land in a target area, transforming the physical fabric of strategic neighborhoods. These lots are converted to community gardens, native planting sites, pocket parks, small community orchards, a 1.5 acre urban farm and training center, and side yard expansions. All of these strategies for vacant land reuse serve to both improve quality of life for residents and demonstrate best practices for neighborhood projects across the city. The YNDC has established 6 community gardens on vacant land, which provide space for neighborhoods residents, primarily low-income individuals and seniors, to produce fresh foods to feed their families. Vacant land reuse at scale also reinforces our homeownership strategies, fostering a sense of ownership and confidence for new investors in the neighborhood.

According to the Vindicator quite a few people showed up for a Free Christmas Dinner at Aulizio’s Banquet Center in Warren. Hundreds experienced the warmth of the 28th annual Families Helping Families Christmas Day Dinner on Sunday. Some came alone, while others brought the whole family to experience what Christmas is all about: caring about people and sharing the warmth of the holiday together — whether you are strangers or not.

“I have been coming about 15 years,” said Barbara Strother of Warren. “When I first started coming, I did some volunteer work. I liked to help out those who are less fortunate than I am because that’s what Christmas is all about. This time, I came out with my friends to spend time with them. It’s a great blessing to me that I get to sit here with my very best friends.”

The dimly-lit banquet hall gave off a romantic feeling that was enhanced by the sound of a soft flute playing in the background and Santa’s jolly laugh. Children ran around showing off new toys they received from Santa as a balloon maker made balloon animals and passed them out, offering lessons to anyone who wanted them. The hall felt homey.

Around the corner from the main dining and fellowship area were steaming dishes with smiling volunteers scooping the offerings up for guests. On the menu: ham, turkey, green beans, corn, mashed potatoes and stuffing. Dunkin’ Donuts, Piccadilly Parlour, Perkins Restaurant and Bakery and Panera Bread all donated to the seemingly never-ending dessert table.

“It’s like clockwork anymore,” said Dan Polivka, Trumbull County Commissioner, of organizing the event. “We have so many good volunteers. They know their job each year.”

And this touches on an ongoing theme of my podcasts. That it is in giving that we become the people we have the potential to be. That goes for organizations and for individuals. I know it seems to be something that we talk a lot about around the holidays, but the truth is that the holidays are a great reason to remind people that giving is a basic function of living in civilized society, but it is a year round attitude of looking for reasons to give and finding ways of giving that brings out the humanity in all of us. It is true that when we give to others, we do receive back. But sometimes we do not get anything back from those we give, but there is always a benefit to giving to each other.

GOT GAME? Want to Play in the Game of Hope Family Fun Fest?

If you do, or even think you do, it’s time to sign up to get on the roster for the biggest charity basketball game of the season, The Hope Foundation’s Game of Hope Family Fun Fest being held on Saturday, February 11, 2017 at YSU’s Beeghly Center.

The Hope Foundation of Mahoning Valley asks that each participant that is selected makes a goal to raise at least $300 through donations, side events, ticket sales, or any other means.

Here’s your chance to hit the court with local celebrities and a number of surprise, big-name ‘walk-ons’ to help raise money for our region’s chronically and terminally ill children.

To get on a team, Click Here to Fill out the Information Form. Space is limited and registration closes QUICKLY so reserve your spot today! With the RETURN of the Game of Hope, the effect will be that everyone is in this together will raise money for chronically/terminally ill children.

According to their website, The Hope Foundation of the Mahoning Valley (H.F.M.V.) a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization, was founded in 2007 after the increasing success and popularity of the Game of Hope Charity Basketball Classic. Unpaid staff, volunteers and supporting individuals and organizations are committed to our mission. We improve the quality of life for our community’s chronically and terminally ill children and their families through charitable support. With money raised from donations and our signature fundraisers The Foundation provides grants up to $5,000. For more information about The Foundation please visit the website at www.HopeMV.org.

According to the Tribune Chronicle Warren has commissioned some artwork that will also serve a public purpose; Bike Racks. It wasn’t bicycle weather as Doug Meyer and Carl Henneman worked to install the first of four bike racks that will double as public art projects in the city. Meyer, a metal artist who lives in Warren and has a workshop in Garrettsville, had to shovel away snow before securing the 12-foot long sculpture made from 1-inch tubular steel outside Trumbull Family Fitness near the corner of High Street NW and Mahoning Avenue NW.

He was commissioned by Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership, which received a $4,000 grant from the Ohio Arts Council to finance four dual-purpose pieces that would be both functional and artistic. “I’m familiar with Doug’s work,”said Henneman, who is working with TNP through AmeriCorps VISTA, a federal program that works with communities to overcome poverty. “He was one of the first artists who came to mind, and I contacted him to get a proposal in. He made a scale model of this, and it blew everyone away.”

“He was really good to do first, because he’s done this kind of work a lot and on a pretty big level. He has his own workshop. I just knew he could do it and pull it off,” Henneman said.

This is the kind of project that everyone in this Valley should support rigorously. Arts are one of the important activities that everyone benefits from. The Artists benefit from the fulfillment of creating. The patrons benefit from setting an example for generations upcoming. And the public benefits from the exposure to the different perspectives and opinions so as to help all of us understand that although we are all individuals, we all have more in common then we have differences.

Bracelet sales to support Emergency Assistance programs throughout the Diocese.

When you purchase a bracelet in support of our Emergency Assistance Program, you will be providing help, and creating hope to a family in need. Without the continuous support of our community our doors would close, and we would be forced to turn away those in critical need. Without you, we are nothing.

Our Emergency Assistance Programs combine material and financial assistance with advocacy efforts for people in need of food, shelter, clothing, transportation, utility payments, homeless outreach and other services essential to well-being.

Extending help and hope in times of crisis and need to families and children is a vital part of Catholic Charities mission and identity.

Won’t you please join us to support our neighbors and friends of the Diocese? 

Catholic Charities served 10,693 children through the Emergency Assistance Program in 2015.  We also assisted 754 people in finding shelter/homes in 2015 to prevent homelessness.  Thank you for your continued support.

According to Youngstown State University, The 2016 NCAA Division I-FCS National Finalist Youngstown State football team will have a meet and greet prior to the men’s basketball game against Milwaukee on Thursday, Dec. 29, at 6 p.m., the YSU Athletics Department announced.

The student-athletes will greet fans, take pictures and sign autographs before the game in the general admission section on the West side of the Beeghly Center. Fans can also participate in the Rulli Bros. “Holiday Hoops” promotion for December where fans can receive a buy one, get one free offer on general admission tickets by asking for the “Holiday Hoops” special upon ordering their tickets. The Penguins face James Madison in the national championship game on Saturday, Jan. 7, at Noon Eastern. It marks Youngstown State’s seventh appearance in the national title game.

Although many people may not give much thought to this, supporting college sports through attending the games helps to defray the costs of running the entire College. So when you go out to see a basketball game or a football game or any YSU sporting event, you are helping to keep the cost of a higher education down for all students. So get on out there and cheer for our student athletes.

Although this happened last month, I think it is important to recognize one of the premiere children health facilities in the nation. Akron Children’s Hospital was recognized for Innovative Patient Experience. According to their website, Akron Children’s has been recognized by Becker’s Hospital Review, a leading source of cutting-edge healthcare news, as one of 50 hospitals nationwide with innovative patient experience programs.

According to Becker’s, “The hospitals and health systems on this list are among those committed to keeping up with – or getting ahead of – the pace of change in healthcare by forming dedicated centers and institutes for innovation.” One of the ways the hospital’s patient experience program is innovative is in its approach, which the center’s director, Stefan Agamanolis, PhD, refers to as human-centered design.

“An increasing body of research illustrates how delivering a positive experience in healthcare can improve medical outcomes,” Agamanolis said. “For example, reducing stress and anxiety strengthens the immune system, which in turn impacts infection and recovery rates. If an institution is to fully embody a mission to solve medical problems and improve health, it cannot merely provide a technical service – it must also be able to deliver thoughts and feelings in the same way any other business working with human beings must do so.”

The Akron Children’s Hospital Foundation works to ensure that the hospital can continue to uphold its three promises: treat each other the way we’d want to be treated; treat each child as if he was our own; and turn no child away because of a family’s inability to pay.

Your financial and in-kind donations help support our mission, and we’re grateful for your support. Each gift, regardless of its size, makes a difference in the patients we care for every day.