Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 33

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This is the Mahoning Valley Podcast and it occurred to me that there a plenty of people here who may want to do a segment. Who may want to have their voice heard on a Podcast. Maybe you have an event or cause or just want to say hi to the Valley. This podcast was never meant to be all about me. It has been a work in progress. Well, it is your turn. If you want to record a segment and email it to me, I will consider adding it to an episode.

Because this is a community project, you must be a part of the Mahoning Valley or have some connection to the Valley. If you want to talk about your grandma or how you grew up in Struthers or what you favorite restaurant is, or favorite gym, or favorite bar, or favorite band or anything. It just needs to be about something or someone in the Mahoning Valley.

Free Shoutouts with Mahoning Valley Podcast

You may be thinking, how much is this going to cost me. Nothing. Nada. Just record on your phone. Record with your friends. Record on your laptop or tablet. Save the file as an MP3 and send it over. Send it over with any links or pictures you want to include. This is all about everyone here in the Valley. So give it a try. It is easy and free and will get your voice added to the Mahoning Valley Podcast Archive. Send as many as you want. Any topic. BUT, no bad language. I look forward to helping you be a part of the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

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I touched on this a couple of weeks ago, and I am going to go by it again today. Get registered to vote if you have not already done so. Get involved with our local politics. Don’t leave it for someone else to do. Don’t try to say you don’t have time or it doesn’t matter. It still matters. Your vote matters.

Your voice needs to be heard. And if you are in Youngstown, you will have the opportunity to get out and talk to some of the candidates on Monday March 20.

Register to Vote with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Core Team Ministry of Union Baptist Church presents a Candidate Forum on Monday, March 20, 2017 at UBC, 528 Lincoln Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 44502 from 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm. Invited guests are all candidates running for Mayor, President of Council, Clerk of Courts and Municipal Court in the City of Youngstown. Come and listen, ask questions and be an informed voter! 330-746-1217)

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DYP with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Downtown Youngstown Partnership (DYP) is a community-based organization which seeks to foster an environment where businesses thrive, art flourishes, residents are abundant and community pride prevails. The group plans to fills the gaps where needed as it relates to attracting and retaining business and community pride in the downtown Youngstown area.

Please join us for our March 28 meeting! Appetizers and drinks will be provided.

5:00pm: Sign In & Welcome

5:15pm: Agenda

1. City of Youngstown Update:
– First Ward Councilperson Julius Oliver
– Michael McGiffin, Director Of Events & Special Projects

2. Business Spotlight:
– The Federal

3. Service Project Update
– Updates regarding service projects or opportunities.

4. Downtown Updates and Happenings:
– Open time to share any events, promotions, or activities happening with businesses or organizations Downtown.

6:00-7:00pm: Socialize!

A special thanks to The Federal for hosting this meeting!

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Ursuline Band Boosters with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Ursuline Band Booster Organization is committed to the music program at Ursuline High School and we need your help to continue our work. Our annual quarter auction fundraiser will take place on Saturday March 18, 2017 at Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish Center. Doors open at 5:30pm with the auction starting at 6:30pm. All money raised will support the Marching and Concert Band programs at Ursuline. Tickets are now on sale and can be purchased from any band student or staff member. You can also contact Roseanne Winner at 330-402-0075 or Debbie Pruchniewicz at 330-559-4004 for tickets. With 100 gifts to bid on it is sure to be a great evening.
For more info please visit our website at www.ursulineband.com
Don’t Forget Your Quarters!!

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Meals on Wheels of Mahoning Valley needs you to volunteer. Our seniors need you to visit and bring by something to eat. And you would be in good company. Mario Andretti volunteers and so can you. Just don’t speed to get there.

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According to the Business Journal Daily, March 23 is the deadline to get your registration in for Spark Talks with Chris Thompson on March 28.Collaboration’s Essential Element: Leadership” is the topic of the March 28 “Spark Talk” presentation sponsored by The Raymond John Wean Foundation.

The presenter will be Chris Thompson, president of Civic Collaboration Consultants LLC.

This two-way learning opportunity provides hands-on exercises designed to develop and strengthen collaborative leadership skills. Participants will leave with usable strategies and approaches to increase efficiency and effectiveness.

The presentation will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Western Reserve Room of the foundation offices here. The cost of $10 per person includes light refreshments. The session is limited to 25 participants, and the registration deadline is March 23. To register, visit this website.

Ohio Optometric Association with MAhoning Valley Podcast

Congratulations go out to Dr. Rebecca Brown of Salem on her election as president for the Ohio Optometric Association. According to the Business Journal Daily, “

Brown, who practices at Essential Vision Care here, has served in the association as a zone governor, trustee and several officer positions. She was selected to her new role by a unanimous vote at the recent East West Eye Conference.

“It is a great honor to serve my profession and the many people receiving our vision services in this manner,” Brown said in a statement. “It is a blessing to be able to help people in our community every day, but it is very meaningful to be able to influence and help legislators understand issues important to saving vision.”

In April, Brown will be leading dozens of Ohio optometrists to the Statehouse for a day of advocacy. They will help state legislators learn the best ways to help Ohioans preserve and maintain their vision.

A graduate of Salem High School, Brown has practiced optometry locally for 13 years. She received her doctorate from the Southern College of Optometry and her bachelor of science from John Carroll University. She completed a residency with the U.S. Veterans Administration.

Brown volunteers for InfantSEE, Vision USA and Realeyes Save Our Sight Classroom Initiative. She also is an active member of the Salem Junior Mothers’ Club, Kiwanis Club of Salem and Dustin Huffman Memorial Scholarship Board.

KISS with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

KISS is a program that let’s school children bring someone they love to school with them. Boardman Local Schools carries the program and according to the Vindicator, it is a strong effort to involve parents in the education of their children.

As a working mom, Heather Newman doesn’t get to attend many of her kids’ school functions.

That’s why she was especially happy to be her son’s special person Wednesday at Robinwood Lane Elementary’s KISS – “Kids Invite Someone Special” – Day.

The annual tradition is a chance for family members, or another special person in a student’s life, to see what their student is up to during the school day.

“It’s about trying to bring the community into the schools,” Principal Don Robinson said. “The kids get so excited when they get to bring their special friend to school.”

Second-grade student Cooper Bartholomew asked grandfather Joe Novosel to be his special someone, continuing a tradition for the two.

Cooper said he asks his grandfather to come every year, and Joe always enjoys the visit.

“It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “I try to encourage him so that he is going to be an outstanding citizen and leader someday.”

Read more about the event in Today’s Vindicator or on http://vindy.com

For more great podcasts, head on over to the PodtoPod Directory

marchmadnesswith the Mahoning VAlley Podcast

A Canfield Native, Paul Krebs helped set up the NCAA Tournament this year. According to the Vindicator,

A 1974 Canfield High School graduate, Krebs is currently in his 10th year as vice-president and athletic director at the University of New Mexico. This was his first appointment on what many believe is the NCAA’s most prestigious and influential group — the men’s basketball tournament selection committee. Krebs will oversee Midwest and South Region first-round games beginning Friday in Sacramento, California.

“In terms of service and the committees to which they have been appointed, ask any athletic director and they will tell you that there is not a better assignment,” Krebs said prior to his Sacramento flight. “It is absolutely fun, the basketball is exciting and between committee members and NCAA staff, it’s a great group with plenty of camaraderie.”

The committee members even participated in a “practice” for Selection Sunday that took place in February.

“We met in Indianapolis about a month ago and went through a mock exercise, which was very helpful,” Krebs said. “Last Tuesday, the committee arrived at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square, started in earnest on Wednesday and never left the hotel after that. We created eight brackets on Sunday, which were based on the outcomes of five or six games and it just happens so quickly, which is why you prepare different brackets.”

Accommodating the media was also a part of the process.

“On two separate occasions, both CBS and ESPN came into our meeting room in order to shoot ‘B roll’ in advance of their selection shows,” Kreb said. “The stuff that we were working on at the time was put away and concealed.”

He admits that his time in the area during his formative years were a lot of fun.

“I used to get back home once or twice a year when my mother was still living in Canfield and have great memories of growing up next door to Dick and Dr. Ray Duffett, and Bob Dove and his family on Neff Drive,” he said. “Those were truly special times.

“I still follow YSU and President Tressel, know the great job Bo Pelini has done with the Penguin football program and also follow Ohio State as well. Twitter and Facebook has helped in that area.”

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 31

You can Download this Audio File from the Internet Archive for listening anytime you want.

The St Patty’s Day Parade will be at 1PM on Market Street in Boardman. And it is a free candyfest for you and your family. Bring your own bags and you can stock up for a whole year. Seriously. I have been in the past and even when we left the candy on the ground and only took what was handed to us, we ended up with somewhere between 2-4 lbs of tootsie rolls, lollipops, and assorted sweets. All in their wrappers passed out during the usual 2 hour or so parade of just about every fire department, police department, and many local companies.

St Patricks Day Parade Anouncers with Mahoning Valley Podcast

It is a beautiful and noisy affair. Sirens going off, horns blowing, and plenty of pageantry. Seriously fun as long as you are dressed for the weather and bring your own chair. And get there early if you want a seat right next to the street. Even last year when there was a rather steady rain and it was about 40 degrees outside. That was why we left the candy on the street if it was thrown at us. Because the street was wet and there was plenty of candy being handed to us. So how long has the Mahoning Valley been hosting a St Patty’s Day Parade you may ask? And what is the history of the Irish in the Mahoning Valley? I found you a few sources if you want to find out.

According to their website, This year the Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade celebrates its 39th Anniversary! Our theme this year is “May The Irish Be With You”. The Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade is one of the largest parades in the state of Ohio. Each year 25,000 to 30,000 spectators come out to celebrate this beloved family tradition. Among the Sponsors of the parade are WFMJ TV-21, The CW WBCB and The Vindicator.

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History of the Irish in Mahoning Valley and Youngstown with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

According to the Book, “Irish in Youngstown and the Greater Mahoning Valley” The first Irish Settler arrived in this Region with John Young; the namesake for Youngstown in 1796 and purchased 1000 Acres and settled down. Plenty of Pictures if you are into that sort of thing, just by clicking on the link.

For much more on the History of the Irish in the Mahoning Valley, Please visit Steel Valley Voices. An incredible compendium of historical accounts of the Hogan Family and other early Irish Immigrants to the Mahoning Valley. Fascinating reads and more pictures if you like history all compiled by our favorite local educational resource. YSU.

Starting to feel a little green and wanting to explore even more Irish Culture and Events? Well the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley is planning a neart of activities. Hey, wow, I spoke Ulster flavored Gaelic. Did you hear that? Anyway, Check out all the Events our fabulous library is planning to Celebrate the Green.

Mahoning and Youngstown Public Library Leprechaun with Mahoning Valley Podcast

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Library Leprechaun Lollapalooza Oh yeah, try saying that 3 times fast. Well, you can try it. I won’t.

Join in the Saint Patrick’s Day festivities at the Poland and Canfield libraries on Saturday, March 11. Irish food for sale all day at Kravitz Deli in Poland Library and Kravitz Express in Canfield Library. Corned beef & cabbage dinners, stout stew, corned beef sandwiches, Bailey’s cheesecake.

9:30 a.m. (Poland Library) – Leprechaun Magic Show

9:30 a.m. (Canfield Library) – Burke Irish Dancers

10:15 a.m. (Poland and Canfield) – Parade of leprechauns! Dress as a leprechaun or in your most festive Saint Patrick’s Day gear and join a parade through the library! Each child who enters the parade will receive an entry for a chance to win a book of Irish fairy tales. For children in grade six and under.

10:45 a.m. (Poland and Canfield Libraries) – St. Patrick’s Day story time for children of all ages.

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. – (Poland Library) – Lucky Coin Book Sale in the Friends of PLYMC Bookstore inside Poland Library. Select a coin and get a percentage off your total bill. Cookies will be provided for the kids. Check out the new Friends of PLYMC bag coffee that will be sold at the bookstore located in Poland Library. Proceeds benefit the Library’s children’s programming.

11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. (Poland and Canfield Libraries) – Scavenger hunt for grades six and under and a great time to visit the café for an Irish lunch.

12:30 p.m. (Poland Library) – Burke Irish Dancers

12:30 p.m. (Canfield Library) – Leprechaun Magic Show

Then on March 14th, ‘Tis the Luck of the Irish” Local professional musicians play Irish chamber music to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. No reservations are needed for this special program. For any age at the Poland Library, at 7 p.m.

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YSURF and the Mahoning Valley Podcast

YSURF is leading the way in creating private/public partnerships to improve the well being of our Community. A most recent example is the acquisition of a 200K Grant from Lift will create the first ever “teaching factory”. “Teaching Businesses” of all kinds are able to bring new ideas and technology to organizations that may be struggling to keep up with modern technologies while finding the staffers necessary to operate them. It is a brilliant way of developing economic opportunity in areas like our Valley where we need to continue to embrace technology to compete on a global scale.

According to Lift, As manufacturing becomes increasingly advanced, the industry will need workers with more technical skills to work on and operate the high tech equipment the manufacturing industry is using today and that will be developed in the future. For Ohio manufacturers to meet this growing need, LIFT –Lightweight Innovations For Tomorrow has joined a partnership among Mahoning Valley manufacturers, educators at all levels, and workforce developers, led by Youngstown State University Research Foundation (YSURF), to develop the Mahoning Valley Innovation & Commercialization Center (MVICC).

This public- private partnership will create an educational and entrepreneurial hub to share facilities, equipment, and instructors – all necessary to build the educated and skilled manufacturing workforce for the region.

The MVICC will serve as the first of its kind for the manufacturing industry, creating a “Teaching Factory” by replicating the concept of teaching hospitals across the U.S. The Teaching Factory will use shared equipment, facilities and training, all focused on the greater purpose of creating and shaping the talent of tomorrow and further developing incumbent workers today.

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Meals on Wheels Public Service Announcement with Mario Andretti.

The deadline to purchase tickets for the 16th annual Community Star awards dinner is Monday.

Co-sponsored by the Tribune Chronicle and Trumbull 100, the Community Star program celebrates local volunteers who go above and beyond to make a measurable impact in the lives of others. Ten people were selected from 47 nominations received this year.

“There were quite a few great nominations this year, and it was difficult to narrow to 10. This year’s winners have a huge impact in so many areas of our community. They are so inspirational,” said Sue Shafer, community events coordinator for the Tribune Chronicle.

The 2017 Class of Community Stars are:

D’Andre Bowers of Warren is the chief officer of Warren Neighborhood Initiative, which was created in 2016 with the goal of helping develop and revitalize neighborhoods in Warren;

• William E. Casey of Hubbard helped create the Adopt-A-Home program in Warren and donated $25,000 to help get the project that revitalizes the central city neighborhood in Warren off the ground;

• Amanda Colbert of Warren is a board member of Team Sanders Inc., a nonprofit group that provides after-school programs and focuses on community involvement, and she started Colbert’s Care, a group of people dedicated to community service;

• Shirley Frazier of Southington is director of the food pantry at Grace United Methodist Church on Drexel Avenue NW in Warren, a job she has given her time toward for 10 years. Frazier, a retired nurse, also volunteers at St. Joe’s at the Mall, a full-service health and wellness center of St. Joseph Warren Hospital;

• William H. Gore of Cortland is a U.S. Army veteran who as a member of the American Legion Post 540 in Cortland served as post chairman for the American Legion Buckeye Boys State. Gore also serves as chaplain for the Vietnam veterans chapter in Warren and is an active member of the Trumbull County Honor Guard;

• Elliott Heckman of Warren repairs bicycles and gives them to the Salvation Army to distribute to kids at Christmas;

• Lou Lepro of Warren is vice president of the Trumbull Deanery of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. In that capacity, Lepro, in part, manages the kitchen and dining hall and oversees and helps the volunteers. In addition, he helped form the Historical Perkins Homestead Neighborhood Association;

• James McFarland of Warren served and serves on several local boards, including the Warren-Trumbull County Public Library board, which he has been a member of for 20 years. McFarland also is on the Base Community Council at the Youngstown Air Reserve Station;

Dr. Farid Naffah of Cortland created the Avamar Foundation, which helps the elderly needy population pay for medication. Each year since 2010, he has hosted a fundraiser to raise money for the foundation; and

James Shuttic of Warren is president of the board of directors of the Fine Arts Council of Trumbull County, a role that lets him develop events to give artists a chance to show their work. An artist, Shuttic has created and helped install a variety of public art projects in the Garden District of Warren. Make sure to stop by the Fine Arts Council page on Facebook to give em a like.

“On behalf of Trumbull 100, we would like to congratulate all of the recipients of the Community Star award this year,” said Jordan Taylor, president of Trumbull 100. “Trumbull 100, in co-sponsorship with the Tribune Chronicle, are proud to be able to highlight the best in community service Trumbull County has to offer.”

Full profiles of each person will be featured in a special section that will be published March 22 in the Tribune Chronicle.

Tickets for the banquet at St. Demetrios Community Center in Warren are available at the newspaper office, 240 Franklin St. SE, by phone or by an order form that will run frequently in the pages of the Tribune Chronicle. For more information, contact Shafer at sshafer@tribtoday.com or at 330-841-1696.

The event is open to the community and the Mahoning Valley Podcast salutes all the winners this year for demonstrating and modeling the best in human nature here in our Valley.

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Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 26

What is a Podcast, Pseudocast and Noncast? A Local and Regional Podcast Sampler today on the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

To support this Podcast go here and become a sponsor through Paypal or buy something from Amazon, or sign up to get more Twitter Followers, or get more great Audio Products from Learnoutloud.com or Consider hiring me for Freelance or Contract Work. Plenty of ways to support this Community Project for the Mahoning Valley of NE Ohio.

Do you want to subscribe to this podcast? Then visit Podomatic here.

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I am such a fan of podcasting. It gives nearly anyone the opportunity to produce audio that can be listened to anywhere you have a smartphone, tablet, or computer. It seems to me that some other people around here are starting to see the potential, so I decided to show them some love with some samples of their work.

We also have some people who are reaching for podcasting, but have not quite gone all the way. Those people are pseudocasting or noncasting. Either they are calling something a podcast and it is not. Or they are simply recording some stuff and not technically “casting” it anywhere.

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We have had a number of podcasting efforts here too. But for whatever reason the producers stopped producing episodes, but you can still go to these websites and download past episodes some of which are pretty good. I will give you a sample of some of these as well today.

But I figured since this is a community effort and the Mahoning Valley Podcast is a community project, it would not hurt to at least give people a chance to up their game. So if you are pseudocasting or noncasting, listen up and we will get you up to speed today.

I am going to start with the people and organizations that are actually publishing content that you can listen to on demand currently and work down to the folks that are still trying to get here. I highly recommend that you give them a listen. I did not put these in any specific order so if something interests you, click on the link and subscribe and show them some love.

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We have a decent music podcast hosted by a fellow who goes by the name of Jimmy Fro. He enjoys discussing music with local musicians. Recently he did an episode with a couple of local musicians who call themselves the SuperBabes. Let’s give a listen. Naturally you can click on the link above to subscribe or find out more information about the Jimmy Fro Show. You can also click the link and go like the SuperBabes.

We also have another Music Show produced by YoLive Radio that concerns itself with hip Hop and Rap Music and bill themselves as purveyors of the underground scene for this genre. They have a pro account over on Spreaker. Click the link above to hear some more from them. But let’s give em a listen.

Now if you are interested in Guns and Shooting there is a podcast based up in Garrettsville called the “Eye on the Target”. It looks as if they are also running some live broadcasts as well. I have never heard of podcast garden where their podcast is hosted, but it requires a little tech knowledge to actually listen to their stuff On Demand. If you want some pointers on how to download their episodes, just let me know. And let’s see what they have to say for themselves.

We actually have two marketing podcasts here in the Mahoning Valley. I have a preference as to what it a better effort and the primary reason that I feel this way is that one is obviously self promotional and one is actually educational without the obvious self promotion. We will listen to a little of both and you can decide who you like better.

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First Ross Morrone’s This is Marketing

Then George Farris’s podcasts.

Podcasts that call themselves podcasts but cannot be downloaded easily or not at all without a special app are really pseudocasting. They say they are podcasting but in reality they are only recording files for people to listen to when they are found on the internet. Many people are not familiar with the idea of downloading a file from a web page. And they are not sure what to do with it once they do. That is why all my episodes provide multiple options for download in a number of formats. Because not everyone has a ipod. Or a Macintosh Operating system. Nor do they want to install Itunes. So that means that if you are only offering your psuedocast on Itunes or Stitcher, you are leaving people out of the wonderful experience of listening to your show when they want to, where they want to, and how they want to. It is a pseudo experience and presentation. Here are few pseudocasts.

Meals on Wheels Mahoning Valley PSA If you have free time then put it to good use, please.

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The City of You falls into the pseudocast category. Mainly because it cannot be downloaded. These guys are working off a grant so I am guessing that they are content with recording an interview and posting it on soundcloud. And that is great. But there are no notes or links on the show. And the episodes cannot be downloaded. That makes it a pseudocast.

The Nursery. A comedy and story telling “podcast” on Stitcher. Stitcher seems like a good idea and is moderately popular in the podcasting world; however you have to download the app to actually listen to anything there.

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So although it is technically on demand, it is also proprietary. Meaning if that is the only place you make your “podcast” available, many people will never hear it. As such, I was unable to download an episode to give you a sample. It is mildly entertaining to me, I would rate it a 7. You may like it more if you want to give it a listen and let me know what you think. I am always interested in people’s opinions.

Vindy Radio Someone obviously buffaloed the management of the Vindicator into thinking that they are doing podcasts. Again, these are pseudocasts. There is not a distribution mechanism and very sparse show notes. But it is the lack of distribution that makes these a pseudocast. And that is kind of sad because one of my favorite local Radio Personalities hosts these shows.

We do have another pseudocast that is sponsored by WYSU and a Business Development Officer for Humilty of May Health Partners that is still being produced called “Doing Good”.

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It seems to be focused on spotlighting people who have and are doing good things here in the region. Although it has been around for a couple of years now, it is still not really a podcast in the sense that if you want to listen to it on demand, you have to know how to download it. Again, if you need some help with downloading the episodes, just let me know. It is not that hard, but does require a little tech knowledge. But let’s listen to the last episode as these are all only a few minutes long.

Defunct Podcasts you can still listen too by clicking the links below would be considered noncasts. As they quit. They are not producing current content. And they may also fall into both categories of pseudocasting and noncasting. Because they do not produce content that is distributed properly and they quit producing current content.

Mercy Health Podcasts. Actually not out of the Mahoning Valley, but the organization does have a presence here so I included a brief sample. They also are still reaching for it, because they have not syndicated their episodes. Unless you know how to download a file from a web page, no podcast for you. But give a listen. Good production values anyway.

WYSU was for a short time making some of their shows available in the form of on demand audio as well in fact they actually had four different shows going at the same time, but it looks like they quit producing episodes in 2015. You can still go there and listen in. Just follow the links.

Looking Out is a forum for community leaders to come together and discuss national and global issues from often unexplored angles. This round-table discussion covers many topics ranging from the economy to foreign policy, and ecology to education. Here is a sample.

Life on Life’s Terms, was developed to address issues of chemical dependency in the minority community. The show addresses concerns that are unique to the minority population by inviting special guests to share their addiction recovery stories with the listening audience. Guests provide real-life testimony and disseminate information about educational opportunities to our recovering listeners, women, African Americans, Latinos, youth, and parents who are affected by the societal concerns of alcohol and drug abuse. Education and information at the grass roots level is the goal.

Crisis assistance is available through Help Hotline 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Just Dial 211. The telephone numbers given by this pseudocast are:

In Youngstown: (330) 747-2696 Warren: (330) 393-1565 Toll free: 1-888-317-2169

If you need additional information or want to share your views and opinions about the program or addition recovery, please feel free to write: Here is a little sample of the last episode in November of 2016. And you can click on the link above to send snail mail.

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There are more of them on the WYSU Website here. Well produced but again, not distributed or presented properly. Click on the Programs Tab on the Main Menu you will find a plethora of files you can listen to and download.

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 23 Transcript

Please listen or download this episode here.

Showing some love to the following. Make sure to click through and show some love too. It is Valentines Day almost. So make sure to show some love.

Getting Crafty at Salem Public Library. Music and Glass. Last Minute Valentines Shopping at Bella Marias. Northside Farmers Market kicks off a new season. Get your Greek on at Archangel Michael’s Greek Orthodox Church. Big Fish. Rich Center Breakfast. Slice of the Valley Pizza Challenge. YMCA Art Festival. Messages from Cupid. The Ulster Project Wine Tasting. Keynote Media Group.

Explore the ease of using matte acrylic chalk paint on glassware at the February 13, 2017 Gettin’ Crafty class for adults that will meet in Salem Public Library’s Quaker Room beginning at 6:30pm. All materials will be provided, the class is open to the public and there is no cost to attend. Seating is limited so please register online at www.salem.lib.oh.us, call for assistance/ information at 330-332-0042, or stop in at 821 E. State St., Salem, OH 44460. Have a pleasant evening at your local library being creative.

Have you ever wanted to create Stained Glass? Do you enjoy mellow music while you are creating? Head on out to the Cornelius Studio on February 12th. That will be Sunday at 12PM and bring $40.00 with you to cover the cost of your materials. You will get to listen to some healing musical selections and learn the craft of Stained Glass Creation with Mara Linaberger Click in this link to make a reservation or let them know you are coming.

There will be a Mini Vendor Blender at Bella Maria’s on Monday starting at 630PM in Boardman. Make sure to click on the link and let them know you are going and you heard about it on the Mahoning Valley Podcast. LuLaRoe – Plexus – Rodan + Fields – Premier Jewelry – doTerra Essential Oils – Soldier Sweets – Platinum Paw Barkery / One Hot Dog Designs – Michelle from Salon Sherrici – Karma Korn Poppery will all here there. Come eat, drink, & shop.

The Northside Farmers Market will be open on Saturday February 11 starting at 10AM. Join them for the opening of the 2017 Youngstown Northside Farmers Market. We will be inside at 818 Elm St, Youngstown OH. Celebrating 14 years of offering fresh, local food and community! Click on the links here and show them some love and let them know you are interested in coming by.

All weekend there is a Greek Festival at Archangel Michael’s Greek Orthodox Church in Campbell. That is located at 401 12th Street in Campbell at Porter Avenue. Will there be all your favorite Greek foods like authentic Gyros, Lamb, and Souvlakis? Heck yeah. Will there be authentic Greek Folk Dancing exhibitions every day? Oh Yeah. Will there be other traditional Greek foods and pastries, activities for children? Auctions? And Daily Food specials? Absolutely. You can go over there Friday starting at 10AM. Or Saturday or Sunday.

Big Fish is a hit at the Fairview Arts and Outreach Center according to the Vindicator. It is playing this weekend and next. To quote their review, “Top Hat’s version definitely captures the tale’s magic, and Brian Palumbo’s performance in the lead role of Edward Bloom is likely one of the best you will see on a local stage this season.The theater makes good use of its stage to create the requisite special effects, including an encounter with a coven of witches. At other times, figments of Edward Bloom’s boundless imagination appear and disappear.

The oddities also include a giant (played to towering effect by Kaleb McFarland), a mermaid and some circus folk. The story revolves around Edward Bloom and his son, Will (played by Anthony Villa, who skillfully mixes adult cynicism with boyish admiration). The elder Bloom has always been a larger than life figure in his son’s eyes because of the astonishing – if barely true – tales of his life. But as his father’s health fades, Will, a realist who is about to become a father to a boy himself, seeks to separate the fact from the fiction about his dad.”

The Vindicator review continues, “Brightening up their every scene is a unit of six young dancers (Haley DiLullo, Jillian Pearl Gady, Teegan Graff, Hunter Lombard, Brianna Phillips and Taylor Sackella) who were very precise and well practiced in their choreography. Their USO dance scene was flawless.”

Big Fish” works on several levels. It has a father-son focus and a circle- of-life theme, and it’s great theater for kids of all ages.

And if the job of any theater is to sweep the audience up in the story, no matter how fantastical it is, then Top Hat’s production succeeds.

Big Fish” will continue with performances at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and Feb. 17 and 18, at Fairview Arts and Outreach Center, 4220 Youngstown-Poland Road. Call 800-838-3006 for reservations.

Meals on Wheels PSA

The Rich Center for Autism will be hosting the best Maple Syrup and Flapjacks Breakfast at Warren G Harding High School in Warren Saturday Morning. Click on the link to let them know you are going.

Get your flapjack from 9am-12pm. The breakfast will include fluffy pancakes, rich maple syrup from local farms, scrambled eggs, and sausage. We will also hold a basket and 50/50 raffle to add to the fun!

Tickets are $10.00 for adults, $6.00 for 10 and under, children 2 and under are FREE. Tickets can be purchased online at www.richcenter.org. Contact Mona at 330.941.1532 or mbozick@ysu.edu with questions or for sponsorship information.

The Slice of the Valley Pizza Challenge will be held on February 18th. According to the Business Journal, Rotary Club of Warren will host its third annual Slice of the Valley Pizza Challenge Feb. 18. The contest will be held from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the banquet facilities of St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church.

Plenty of food, fun and auction items will highlight this year’s event, and the Jim Frank Trio band will provide music throughout the evening, organizers say. Area pizza shops will provide slices to sample and two winners will be crowned: People’s Choice Award, selected by guests’ votes, and the Judges’ Trophy, selected by celebrity judges who sample the pies.

Proceeds will go to the Rotary International project to help the victims of acid attacks in Africa and Trumbull Metropolitan Housing Authority’s Project Play, a collaborative effort to provide children a safe place to play and enjoy outdoor activities on the southwest side of Warren.

Tickets are on sale at this website, from Warren Rotarians and at the door. For more information, call the Rotary Club of Warren at 800 323 3547.

The Davis Family YMCA in Boardman is holding its fourth annual Five Squared benefit art show and sale. The show, which opened Sunday February 5th, runs through March 5.

More than 450 pieces of 5″ x 5″ art from eight countries and eight states are available for purchase at $25 each or 5 for $100 (youth art is $10, or 6 for $50).

In addition to the hundreds of 5″ x 5″ pieces, there will be a silent auction, featuring larger original art and limited edition prints from Richard Bucurel, John Fire, Nancy Hawkins, Rebecca Hawkins, Guy Shively and Don Wright. Bidding for the silent auction will run until 5 p.m. Feb. 19.

All proceeds from the sale and silent auction will go toward providing art classes to under-served children, teens, and families at the Rescue Mission of the Mahoning Valley, Daybreak, Youngstown Christian School and others.

The art show is free and open to the community. Art from the show also can be viewed here. For more information, call the YMCA at 330 480 5656 or email sgray@youngstownymca.org.

Messages from Cupid: Vintage Valentines from 1840-1930″ is the title of the newest exhibit at the Sutliff Museum. The featured valentines from the United States, England and Germany will provide ideas to viewers for their own Valentine’s Day cards, said Melissa Karman, Museum director.

The Museum, operated by The Warren Library Association, is located on the second floor of the Warren-Trumbull County Public Library on Mahoning Avenue here. Admission is free, and the museum is handicapped accessible. Hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

The museum is a memorial to Levi and Phebe Sutliff, who were operators on the Underground Railroad in Trumbull County. For more information, call 330 395 6575 or visit this website.

The Mahoning Valley Ulster Project will host its annual Wine Taste on Feb. 12 at Drake’s Landing here. This is a major fundraiser for the Ulster Project.

Tickets for the event, which takes place from 2 to 5 p.m., are $35 per person and include a wine and beer taste, an assortment of light appetizers, dessert, a Chinese auction, 50/50 raffle and giveaways.

The Mahoning Valley Ulster project is a summer exchange program, which brings together teen leaders from Northern Ireland and the United States. The program offers spiritual, social and service opportunities to help the students discover the common ground they share despite religious differences. Each year, Valley families play host to more than a dozen Northern Irish teens for this enriching experience. More than $20,000 must be raised for air fare and expenses for the July program.

The intent of the Ulster Project is to break down the walls of intolerance and mistrust that exist in Northern Ireland. It was created through the efforts of like-minded peace seekers who strive towards the ultimate goal of creating a community of peace through fostering tolerance, understanding and friendship. The Ulster Project focuses on changing the perception of Ireland’s youth by bringing them together in a strife-free atmosphere that emphasizes acceptance of all people, regardless of creed.

Tickets to the event are pre-sale only and can be purchased by calling 330 565 2900 or 330 518 5290.

Shout out to Keynote Media Group who recently added five companies to its client portfolio.

Penn-Northwest Development Corp. in Sharon, Pa., contracted with the downtown Youngstown marketing firm to develop a new website that will better position the Mercer County region as a prime location for business relocation and expansion, according to a news release from the company.

Keynote also has been hired to create new branding and marketing strategies for Doctors Pain Clinic and Progressive Counseling Center, both in Boardman.

Other new clients include Youngstown companies Roof Rite Inc. a roofing company, and InventorCloud, an additive manufacturing education component of Advanced Methods in Innovation, a Youngstown Business Incubator portfolio company.

Adopt US Kids PSA Follow Adopt US Kids on Twitter

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 20 Transcript

Please listen or download here.

I started drinking when I was 14. I started by stealing liquor with my friends from my dad’s liquor cabinet. Initially the first time, like so many people who start drinking, it felt dangerous and completely different. There was an element of fun and laughter at how challenging it was to walk and hide the activity from my parents. We thought we were so cool.

Before long, I was also using tobacco. The two seemed to be like brother and sister. Take a drink, have a smoke. My parents did not want me smoking or drinking though. They were and still are nice people who were thoughtful and responsible parents. And of course, it is not like I was trying to do it in their faces. I was sneaky as were my friends.

It is important to note that my use of alcohol and tobacco did not start in a vacuum. I had peers who encouraged me and shared my predilection for getting high. We also had older people in our lives who thought that drinking and smoking was cool. These were the 1970’s. And much of society was engaged in the escapism that drinking and taking drugs provided. It was normal in a lot of places for the people who were just little older to smoke weed and drink.

And I stress that it was my own choice to get involved in this activity. Although my friends and the older children and young adults were doing it too, ultimately it was my own choice. And that is where it starts. It is possible and some recovery programs will start with the premise that alcohol or drug addiction is a disease. And it may well be. I do not want to to debate that issue. I can simply say for me that starting the abuse of alcohol and drugs was a choice for me. And I made it. Likewise, getting sober and leaving drugs and alcohol behind was and still is a choice. A daily one. Sometimes, and hourly one. But it still requires that I choose. And choose to be sober.

If you are thinking that it has been some easy road through drunkenness and impairment, I will tell you; it has been a very difficult and lonely road that has resulted in the loss of many things. The loss of relationships. The loss of opportunities. The loss of resources. The loss of time. Much of which there is no guarantee I can ever get back. I know the time I have lost to partying is not something I can get back. Time can only be spent once. And I have wasted a good portion of what was allotted to me chasing a drink or a joint.

I have gone through healthy relationship opportunities and cannot recover some of them. Friends and family who loved me and who I loved have moved on. And there may not be a chance to recover those relationships.

I have gone through jobs and opportunities that will not be offered again. That have passed for good. And now face a time in my life where I have to deal with the fallout. I have damaged my body, perhaps permanently and have to deal with the loss of my personal health. The cost of the party has gone far beyond just what it costs to buy a drink or a bag of weed. And now I may have to go to my grave long before I would have if I had made better choices when I was younger. Long story, short; It has not been a party. It has been a nightmare. But there is hope.

So if you are listening to this or reading this transcript, I want you to know that today you have a choice. Just as I do. I am choosing to stay sober. To deal with whatever comes today in my right mind instead of trying to run away into a bottle or a joint. That is my choice and it is a choice that you can make too. If you are thinking to yourself that it is too hard to face life without a drink or a joint or a pill: I want to encourage you. Yes, it is painful and sometimes difficult. It can even look impossible. But it all begins as a decision. A choice to seek help. And find a way back to a life that does not have the weight of substances as a crutch. You can do it.

Make the choice to start back now. And the first thing you can do is call someone. Call someone you miss. Call someone you love who you know is sober. Call 211. Pick up that phone. Turn this off and make that call and tell the person that you want help. That is the first step. Although it is your responsibility to keep your commitment to living without drugs or alcohol; you do not have to go at it all alone. There are resources to help you start and help you keep at it. But it all starts with you letting someone else know that you want to change. You want to win.

Here are a few phone numbers if you do not want to call your family right now. If you prefer to start this process and then seek support from your friends or family, you can start here. Call 211. Three easy numbers. 211.

211 is an easy to remember three-digit telephone number assigned by the Federal Communications Commission for the purpose of providing quick and easy access to information about health and human services. Professional Information and Referral Specialists work with callers to assess their needs, determine their options and provide appropriate programs/services, give support, intervene in crisis situations and advocate for the caller as needed. 211 is currently available to 93.4% of residents in the United States. Here in the Mahoning Valley, 211 is available to anyone in this area.

Admitting that you need help can be daunting. And is not something that you may want to do. We all think at times, that asking for help is a sign of weakness. But it is OK. You are loved. And we want to help. We want you to get what you need right now. And there are people who are in your life today or have been a part of your life who want to you get what you need. And want you to come back from the dark and loneliness place of substance abuse. We will welcome you with open arms, if you just decide that you want to come back. Call us, whether it be your mom, or your dad, or your brother, or your friend, or if need be call 211. But know that we are here for you still. We forgive you and want you to heal and recover.

One of the things that have and still does help me is having something else to do besides drink. Giving myself a healthy alternative to partying. For me, it is doing this podcast and finding people to help online and off. Making it my personal mission and penance if you will, to help people. If you want help with some problem you are having with the internet and your desire to use the internet to communicate; then I want to participate. I want to help you from a place of experience and knowledge. I do not know everything about using this here internet thing, but I know some things and I know people who know things I do not. If you want to put us to work on your problems or challenges online, just let me know.

You can call me at 330 519-1205 or reach me on my website. I would love to talk with you about using the internet to communicate.

Meals on Wheels PSA with Mario Andretti

By now anyone who listens to this podcast knows that I like free events. Tomorrow, Laura Schroder of YSU will be discussing the Saga of the Mahoning River at YSU. as part of the Spring Semester Speaker Series on Energy and the Environment YSU CUSHWA B112. Free and open to the public. There is ample free parking at the on-street metered-parking spaces along nearby streets. Anyone needing assistance getting to the room should call the YSU Student Security Service at 330-941-1515

This will be a part of the Lecture Series on Energy and the Environment at YSU going on through April Click the link here to find out more.

Back to the Mahoning River:

According to a story on the WKBN Website, The Mahoning River has been part of our area’s history since day one. It was how John Young got here, arriving on the river’s bank, to land that would eventually bear his name. But mention the Mahoning River around Youngstown today and it’s more infamous than famous. Youngstown of the mid-1940s was the poster child for industrial pollution. The steel mills fouled the air and dumped their waste directly into the Mahoning River.

I am fairly certain that Ms Schroder will be discussing how far our community has come in restoring the River to a balanced and healthy waterway. In fact, the good news is that this once dangerous and polluted waterway has recovered so that when the weather breaks if you want to; you can kayak down the river and see the Valley from a whole new perspective.

Just a couple of years ago, our own Stan Boney proved this by kayaking down the river with a guide. According to WKBN, On Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014 WYTV 33 News anchor Stan Boney was part of the first TV News crew to ever kayak down a stretch of the Mahoning River, which was once considered among the most polluted streams in the United States. What he discovered is that this river, which was once a centerpiece of America’s industrial might, is now being used for recreation.

His trip down the Mahoning River began at the kayak launching dock at the B&O station adjacent to downtown Youngstown. He was joined by Christine and Gerald Hurayt, a father and daughter from Austintown, and April Shirilla of Warren, a co-worker of Christine’s at Delphi in Michigan. Their guide was Chuck Miller.

“Water is low and very forgiving today. The level’s about 3 foot. It is recommended for beginners to go at this level,” Miller said.

Chuck Miller has made the 8-mile run to Lowellville 100 times. He did a small video on Youtube here to give you a little taste No offense to Mr. Miller, but you may want to turn the sound down just a little if you view this. This is of course is Mahoning County, but Trumbull County also offers many opportunities to put in and a few different locations.

According to The Trumbull County Metroparks Website, there are six different locations where you can launch your kayak to traverse the River. Click on the link above to find out more. You can also meet with some of the Friends of the Mahoning River at an event this Friday coming up.

According to their calender, Eclipse of the Hunger Moon on Fri, February 10, 7:00pm – 8:30pm at 7574 Columbiana-Canfield Rd., Canfield, OH, 44406, United States

February’s Full Moon AND a Lunar Eclipse! Hope for a clear sky as we walk beneath the only lunar eclipse visible here in 2017. Meet at Kiosk at MetroParks Bikeway Trailhead at MetroParks Farm. Call Ford Nature Center for details. Easy, 1.5 mi.

You can also join the Friends Facebook Group here.

Congratulations to the Lowellville High School Band who has been selected to play at the Ohio Music Education Conference on Saturday in Cleveland.

According to the Vindicator, Bob Antonucci, Lowellville’s high school band director, sees an upcoming showcase as the culmination of decades of work.

The Ohio Music Education Association has selected the band to perform Saturday at a professional-development conference in Cleveland.

Lowellville’s band submitted a recording last May to OMEA. The state association, which is an affiliate of the National Association for Music Education, selects the ensembles it will feature via a blind audition process.

“What OMEA has realized is that they’ve been focusing on the big schools from the suburbs of the big cities – the school districts that have thousands of kids, tons of money, tons of teachers,” Antonucci said. “They’re realizing that there’s good things happening in school districts that don’t fit that. … So, this year they’ve made it a point to feature the top programs in rural and urban school districts, as well.”

About 3,000 music-education professionals will attend the OMEA conference this week. Lowellville’s band, which comprises about 65 students, will play six pieces from a variety of genres.

Like the OMEA Facebook Page here. For more information about Classical Music Events and Opportunities, Like the Orchestra Players Page here.

Adopt US Kids PSA

Transcript Episode 16 of The Mahoning Valley Podcast

Listen, Subscribe or Download it here.

New Star from Youngstown. NIE, (Newspapers in Education) Outing the Mainstream Media Ownership in Mahoning Valley. Bits and Bites at the Mahoning Valley Historical Society. Sign Up to become a Change Bandit for Akron Children’s Hospital. And Opinion on the Trump Inauguration and Impending Presidency.

According to our local CBS affiliate, The star of the new show, “Hunted,” premiering this Sunday, January 22 on CBS, is a Mooney grad from Youngstown. While it might sound glamorous, life for Robert Clark started with everything stacked against him. His early years were nothing like that of a network TV star. Clark was born in Youngstown and raised on the tough streets of the south side, spending ages 4 to 12 in foster care. His father, Bobby Clark, operated the mob-owned Casablanca Night Club until January 15, 1980, when he was allegedly murdered. Robert Clark said his years as a high school student at Cardinal Mooney, Class of 1984, changed him. “They are a part of who I am. The motivation that I had to not just be different, but to be the difference that I want to see in the world,” he said.

Clark also played football at Mooney and was part of the 1982 state championship team under Coach Don Bucci.

Here is another story of people rising up to overcome adversity and history. Much like many of us here in the Mahoning Valley and indeed the Valley itself. Our Valley has a long and storied history of adversity and challenges. Struggles with our local economy, and struggles with less than scrupulous individuals who operated beyond the rule of law and spread fear and strife in our community. But some of us, myself included believe that those struggles can be things of the past. That it is possible to rise above the history of crime and corruption and face the challenges. If you believe that too, you should consider getting involved with this project. Even if you fail to see any reason to drop a couple of pennies in the coffers of this project to keep it going; you can like this and share it with your friends.

Here is something that many people who hear this podcast or read the transcripts may not be aware of. Free Educational Resources from the Vindicator.

For instance: Beyond Comprehension: The Newspaper and Critical Literacy
Dr. Sherrye Dee Garrett, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
Introduction & Overview (mp3, 23 minutes) / Lesson Activities (mp3, 30 minutes)

Critical literacy involves the analysis and critique of the relationships among texts, language, power, social groups and social practices. It shows us ways of looking at written, visual, spoken, multimedia and performance texts to question and challenge the attitudes, values and beliefs that lie beneath the surface. (courtesy NAA NIE Conference) This is just one of the over 300 lessons designed to help your children learn about the world around you. And it is all free. Did I say that? Follow the link above and get in touch or start downloading and teaching them youngins.

Why would you want to download and listen to this particular item? Well, one reason I can think of is that many of your mainstream media outlets in this valley may be just about getting your money. No matter how much squawking they do about their local point of view, they may just be here to make money. Both our CBS and ABC Affiliates are not even owned by a local company. The people who run WKBN and WYTV and the other channels on these bandwidths like 27.2 FOX 27.3 ION and 33.2 and 33.3 live in other communities and have big fat paychecks so they can hire our local reporters and anchors and producers to act like they give a crap about this community. And the local people who work here probably do care about this Valley, but their employers may not.

Although there are a few local people who work for Media General and it is likely they do actually care about the Mahoning Valley; for the most part the editorial direction and personnel decisions are coming from another state and a big media conglomerate located over there in the fine state of Virginia.

Why am I talking about this? Because this company that owns a few of our local tv stations is a public company. That means they have no real interest in local issues or struggles. It means that they are beholden to their stockholders to make a profit and that is all. So that also means that anything they report to you should be taken with a grain of salt.

Let’s look at some other mainstream media companies here in the Valley so you can get an idea of where they are coming from too. The local Newspaper, The Vindicator and Channel 21 WFMJ. These two companies are owned locally. So when they say, “locally owned and locally connected”; they are not flat out lying. But they are also owned by a couple of wealthy people who live in Canfield and are about as connected to our community as a bank is to it’s depositors. As long as they are making money, they are as happy as they can be most likely. To be fair, they do employ some people here in this Valley and contribute economically in terms of taxes and fees and what not. But they also clearly have an vested interest in keeping up with the maintenance on their million dollars estates far removed from the struggles of the city.

Are you interested in knowing how to get in touch with these media mavens who run the show over there at the Vindicator and WFMJ? Here ya go. I figure if I let you know, and you don’t like the way they are doing it; then as a community we can hold them accountable. For the Vindicator, they are required to publish their names and positions and here they are. Keep in mind that Ms Jagnow and Mr Brown are also the people who own the company who holds the FCC License for WFMJ.

Whether or not the Mahoning Valley ever reaches its potential, or starts to grow and flourish due to their influence; that is the question that only they can answer for themselves.

And just so our neighbors in Trumbull County don’t feel left out, The Tribune Chronicle is published by a company out of Wheeling West Virginia. And for those of you in Columbiana County, the Morning Journal, also owned by a company out of Wheeling.

Our Radio Stations also are owned primarily by out of state corporations who are beholden to stock holders more then to our community. The two biggies are Cumulus Media and of course Iheart Media.

So although our mainstream media companies here do have a vested interest in the Mahoning Valley; with the exception of the millionaires who live in Canfield who own the Vindicator and WFMJ; our mainstream media is controlled by people who do not live here. And in many cases do not have any interest here in this community other then how much money they can suck out of us. So when you hear people talk about the media elite and the mainstream media as biased, it probably makes more sense.

I am actually an avid consumer of the media. Not just TV and Newspapers, but interactive media as well. I source much of the information for these podcasts from the local outlets. Sometimes I quote them to talk about the good things that are happening here. Well a lot of the time. That is because in order to talk about the good things that are happening here in the Valley,

I need to know about them. That is one of the things that you can do to help support this project. When you hear about something that is good, let me know. If you have an event that is not all about the money, then let me know. Or if you are doing events that do have a financial component to them like fund raising or raising awareness, at least send me a notice. Give me a chance to cover it here and link to it.

That is the difference between independent media, like this podcast and other independent information sources and the mainstream; I at least am not being enriched by this project greatly. I am doing this podcast as a community service that I have sentenced myself to do. Because I enjoy podcasting and publishing and I love this area. It is my home too.

FEMA PSA

I have received some feedback on content ideas for this podcast and most recently it was to discuss some history of the Valley. Well I got something even better for you if you are interested in the history of the Valley. A free discussion that occurs every third Thursday at the Mahoning Valley Historical Society.

This Thursday, you can join the Mahoning Valley Historical Society for the new Bites and Bits of History Lunch Program. Bring your lunch to the beautiful Tyler Mahoning Valley History Center on the third Thursday of every month at noon for a historical presentation. These free lunchtime discussions will cover a variety of topics and give you a chance to explore local history in a new way.

The daily parking lot on the west side of the building is available for $2.00. Place money in the numbered slot which corresponds to your parking space in the white box on the Federal Street sidewalk. Do not park in the monthly lot on the east side. Street parking in marked spots is free. Additional visitor information.

Bring your own lunch, or visit Overture for their $6 Bites and Bits Lunch Special. Call Overture at 330-744-9900 to place your order. Coffee, pop, and water are available for purchase at the History Center.

This Thursday, The People’s House: A History of the White House

Kimberly Kenney, Curator – William McKinley Presidential Library & Museum

Learn more about the history of the most popular historic home in America! This presentation will cover the design and major restorations of the house, and features an in-depth look at the rooms of McKinley’s White House from the William McKinley Presidential Library and Museum archives.

I encourage you to help the Akron Children’s Hospital this year by signing up to become a Change Bandit. Change Bandits “rob” their friends, family and co-workers of spare change to raise funds for Radiothon.

Children, individuals and families register to participate here.

Schools, businesses, community organizations and hospital departments register here.

We’ll mail your kit to you in early January. It will contain complete, detailed instructions to get your Change Bandit program started, including how to set up an online fundraising campaign for your collection efforts.

Please contact Nicci Avalon at 330-543-8340 or navalon@chmca.org with any questions.

In a few days we will be swearing in a new president and vice president. Donald Trump and Mike Pence. Despite the fact that these good ole white boys did not actually win the popular vote in this county, we are going to have to endure another round of Republican Class divisionism. I know, that may not be an actual English Language word, but it does adequately describe what this country is in for now that the republicans are going to have a majority in the senate and the house and an executive to push through their let’s get ourselves and all of our buddies richer agenda.

Some people may think it ironic that me as a white male would be discussing this turn of events in such terms. In fact, some may think that it is a betrayal of my race or gender to even dare to call the republican party the good ole white boys party. But I just call it like I see it. It should not be called the GOP. It should be called the GOB. For Good Ole Boys.

I will clarify. According to the Wikipedia, this term can be positive or negative. Positive aspects: The term can be used for well socialized men who live in rural and generally Southern areas. If a man is humble and well thought of, he can be referred to as a good old boy, regardless of his age. It is also commonly applied to men from a family with multi-generational wealth or prestige, or to men who behave like a Southern gentleman.

Negative aspects: Pejoratively, the phrase can often suggest a man with an anti-intellectual bias or some other intolerant viewpoint. The phrase also can refer negatively to someone who engages in cronyism among men who have known each other for a long period of time. Collectively, these people are referred to by the slang term, good ol’ boy network (also known as an old boys’ club; however, note that in certain countries in the Commonwealth including the UK, an old boys network or club has a very different meaning involving alumni).

So if you don’t think that Donald Trump and Mike Pence and the Republican Party are a bunch of good ole boys, let me tell you as story. When I first moved here to the Mahoning Valley, I needed a job. Truth is, I probably still need a job, but that is not your problem. I started working at Infocision. One of the largest employers here in the Mahoning Valley.

If you are not familiar with Infocision, they operate call centers. They have a few here and a couple over in Western PA as well as over in the Akron Area. Large employer and actually not too bad as far as employers go. Decent wages back then and reasonable management with advancement opportunities. No they did not pay me to say this and that is why they get no link.

Anyway, I was initially assigned to the political division. Guess who was one of their clients? The Republicans. And a few of their various affiliations. And we called people. We called them at home, we called them at their offices, we called them from 8 AM to 12 AM seven days a week. We called them and told them all about how the republican way of life was under threat and how traditional values were going to disappear. We called them and lied to them about how they were the Business Person of the Year. We called them and tried to frighten them with tales of how the Second Amendment was going to be destroyed and they were going to have to give up their guns. We called them and told them anything we could to get their money.

It was and still is pathetic. In some cases it was exaggeration. In some cases it was outright deceptive. For instance, did you know that the only qualification required to be the Business Person of the Year is do be registered as a Republican and to donate money. That’s all the Republican Party needs you to do to be recognized as a Business Person of the Year. Some days I signed up 20 or so new BPOY’s. If that does not tell you something about this new administration, then maybe this will give you some clues about the kind of people we are going to be calling President and Vice President. Did you know that Donald Trump is still fund-raising? Yes, he is. He is running a store selling presidential bobbles and keepsakes. Inaugural Glasses and other trivial items. To raise money. HUH? No link to that either cause he is not sponsoring this project today.

I am not going to make any bones about it. I do not like modern American politics. I don’t like the democrats or republicans. I don’t like the tactics or agendas of either party. I, like many people think that national politics are not actually representative of my personal interests. But I am not saying we can just ditch the whole thing. As many people say, American Representative Democracy is an experiment. It was born in a noble ideal. That people should be equal and have liberty that is endowed from above.

That is a noble ideal. But it has been playing out like a good ole boys club. And the richer will keep getting richer. And the rest of us will be scrambling around trying to get a hot dog dinner for our families while we work 80 hours a week to put money in other people’s pockets. And trying to take care of our own. There is not a single shred of evidence that Mr. Trump’s Presidency is going to change things much for most of us. Sure, there will be changes. And many people may benefit. But most likely many people will lose too. And at the end of the day, our new President will likely get richer from his experience. And that is good for him. But is it good for you?