Mahoning Valley Podcast Andrea Wood Interview Episode 37

You can download this from SoundCloud here.

If you want or need different audio files to download, head on over to the Internet Archive

AW Portrait

Today we are talking with Andrea Wood the Publisher of the Business Journal Daily here in Youngstown. Thanks for granting me an interview today Ms Wood.

I understand you were a resident of Poland for a while. Please tell me about your favorite place in the Mahoning Valley.

The Central YMCA in Youngstown

The Central YMCA Youngstown Facebook Page

The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley

2:35 I also understand that you and I have in common growing up in the Pittsburgh Area. I went to Central Catholic in Oakland, and you went to Fox Chapel High. Although it is not directly related to the Mahoning Valley, what was your favorite activity in High School?

Pure as the Driven Snow a Melodrama on Amazon

4:05 You started working in Youngstown for one of our local TV Stations WYTV Channel 33 as an investigative reporter and was promoted to chief anchor and executive producer. How did that come about? Moving to Youngstown?

Tokyo House

Affirmative Action

Michael Moliterno

Stacia Erdos

Tokyo House

11:04 What would you tell young people who are just starting out is the most important thing to remember when striving to succeed?

Youngstown Flea

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation on Twitter

Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership on Facebook.

The Youngstown Flea

First Youngstown Flea in April on Facebook

14:43 As an investigative reporter, you must have come across some stories that may have put your life in danger, what do you think was the most dangerous story you have reported on? And why do you feel that way?

Joanne Elaine Coughlin Missing

16:45 Why did you decide to become a journalist? What was the impetus for that decision?

Penn State

Penn State

18:48 What was you inspiration to start the Business Journal Daily in 1984?

Meals on Wheels of Mahoning Valley Page on Facebook. Go ahead and give them a like.

21:10 Once you started the Journal, what was one of the things that you had to deal with that you never would have expected to happen?

22:09 Many people sometimes forget that people in the media have lives outside of the office. What is your favorite off hours activity?

Michael Dyson

Tears We Cannot Stop by Michael Dyson on Amazon

White Privilege

Kathy Miller Story on the Vindicator

Greg Iles Novels

25:08 I am sure you have met many very interesting people in your life, Who was the most interesting and why?

Dolly Parton

Dolly-Parton-in-the-1970s-442243

Dolly Parton benefit for Wildfire Victims.

27:52 If you could do anything tomorrow, anything at all; what would it be?

29:27 What do you most want to be remembered for after you are gone? Is there anything that you want people to think about when they hear your name?

33:24 Is there anything that you wanted to talk about today that I did not ask about?

Dwight Stickler

Easter Brunch at Kravitz in Fellows Riverside Garden

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 31

You can Download this Audio File from the Internet Archive for listening anytime you want.

The St Patty’s Day Parade will be at 1PM on Market Street in Boardman. And it is a free candyfest for you and your family. Bring your own bags and you can stock up for a whole year. Seriously. I have been in the past and even when we left the candy on the ground and only took what was handed to us, we ended up with somewhere between 2-4 lbs of tootsie rolls, lollipops, and assorted sweets. All in their wrappers passed out during the usual 2 hour or so parade of just about every fire department, police department, and many local companies.

St Patricks Day Parade Anouncers with Mahoning Valley Podcast

It is a beautiful and noisy affair. Sirens going off, horns blowing, and plenty of pageantry. Seriously fun as long as you are dressed for the weather and bring your own chair. And get there early if you want a seat right next to the street. Even last year when there was a rather steady rain and it was about 40 degrees outside. That was why we left the candy on the street if it was thrown at us. Because the street was wet and there was plenty of candy being handed to us. So how long has the Mahoning Valley been hosting a St Patty’s Day Parade you may ask? And what is the history of the Irish in the Mahoning Valley? I found you a few sources if you want to find out.

According to their website, This year the Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade celebrates its 39th Anniversary! Our theme this year is “May The Irish Be With You”. The Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade is one of the largest parades in the state of Ohio. Each year 25,000 to 30,000 spectators come out to celebrate this beloved family tradition. Among the Sponsors of the parade are WFMJ TV-21, The CW WBCB and The Vindicator.

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History of the Irish in Mahoning Valley and Youngstown with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

According to the Book, “Irish in Youngstown and the Greater Mahoning Valley” The first Irish Settler arrived in this Region with John Young; the namesake for Youngstown in 1796 and purchased 1000 Acres and settled down. Plenty of Pictures if you are into that sort of thing, just by clicking on the link.

For much more on the History of the Irish in the Mahoning Valley, Please visit Steel Valley Voices. An incredible compendium of historical accounts of the Hogan Family and other early Irish Immigrants to the Mahoning Valley. Fascinating reads and more pictures if you like history all compiled by our favorite local educational resource. YSU.

Starting to feel a little green and wanting to explore even more Irish Culture and Events? Well the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley is planning a neart of activities. Hey, wow, I spoke Ulster flavored Gaelic. Did you hear that? Anyway, Check out all the Events our fabulous library is planning to Celebrate the Green.

Mahoning and Youngstown Public Library Leprechaun with Mahoning Valley Podcast

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Library Leprechaun Lollapalooza Oh yeah, try saying that 3 times fast. Well, you can try it. I won’t.

Join in the Saint Patrick’s Day festivities at the Poland and Canfield libraries on Saturday, March 11. Irish food for sale all day at Kravitz Deli in Poland Library and Kravitz Express in Canfield Library. Corned beef & cabbage dinners, stout stew, corned beef sandwiches, Bailey’s cheesecake.

9:30 a.m. (Poland Library) – Leprechaun Magic Show

9:30 a.m. (Canfield Library) – Burke Irish Dancers

10:15 a.m. (Poland and Canfield) – Parade of leprechauns! Dress as a leprechaun or in your most festive Saint Patrick’s Day gear and join a parade through the library! Each child who enters the parade will receive an entry for a chance to win a book of Irish fairy tales. For children in grade six and under.

10:45 a.m. (Poland and Canfield Libraries) – St. Patrick’s Day story time for children of all ages.

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. – (Poland Library) – Lucky Coin Book Sale in the Friends of PLYMC Bookstore inside Poland Library. Select a coin and get a percentage off your total bill. Cookies will be provided for the kids. Check out the new Friends of PLYMC bag coffee that will be sold at the bookstore located in Poland Library. Proceeds benefit the Library’s children’s programming.

11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. (Poland and Canfield Libraries) – Scavenger hunt for grades six and under and a great time to visit the café for an Irish lunch.

12:30 p.m. (Poland Library) – Burke Irish Dancers

12:30 p.m. (Canfield Library) – Leprechaun Magic Show

Then on March 14th, ‘Tis the Luck of the Irish” Local professional musicians play Irish chamber music to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. No reservations are needed for this special program. For any age at the Poland Library, at 7 p.m.

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YSURF and the Mahoning Valley Podcast

YSURF is leading the way in creating private/public partnerships to improve the well being of our Community. A most recent example is the acquisition of a 200K Grant from Lift will create the first ever “teaching factory”. “Teaching Businesses” of all kinds are able to bring new ideas and technology to organizations that may be struggling to keep up with modern technologies while finding the staffers necessary to operate them. It is a brilliant way of developing economic opportunity in areas like our Valley where we need to continue to embrace technology to compete on a global scale.

According to Lift, As manufacturing becomes increasingly advanced, the industry will need workers with more technical skills to work on and operate the high tech equipment the manufacturing industry is using today and that will be developed in the future. For Ohio manufacturers to meet this growing need, LIFT –Lightweight Innovations For Tomorrow has joined a partnership among Mahoning Valley manufacturers, educators at all levels, and workforce developers, led by Youngstown State University Research Foundation (YSURF), to develop the Mahoning Valley Innovation & Commercialization Center (MVICC).

This public- private partnership will create an educational and entrepreneurial hub to share facilities, equipment, and instructors – all necessary to build the educated and skilled manufacturing workforce for the region.

The MVICC will serve as the first of its kind for the manufacturing industry, creating a “Teaching Factory” by replicating the concept of teaching hospitals across the U.S. The Teaching Factory will use shared equipment, facilities and training, all focused on the greater purpose of creating and shaping the talent of tomorrow and further developing incumbent workers today.

meals-on-wheels-logo_2

Meals on Wheels Public Service Announcement with Mario Andretti.

The deadline to purchase tickets for the 16th annual Community Star awards dinner is Monday.

Co-sponsored by the Tribune Chronicle and Trumbull 100, the Community Star program celebrates local volunteers who go above and beyond to make a measurable impact in the lives of others. Ten people were selected from 47 nominations received this year.

“There were quite a few great nominations this year, and it was difficult to narrow to 10. This year’s winners have a huge impact in so many areas of our community. They are so inspirational,” said Sue Shafer, community events coordinator for the Tribune Chronicle.

The 2017 Class of Community Stars are:

D’Andre Bowers of Warren is the chief officer of Warren Neighborhood Initiative, which was created in 2016 with the goal of helping develop and revitalize neighborhoods in Warren;

• William E. Casey of Hubbard helped create the Adopt-A-Home program in Warren and donated $25,000 to help get the project that revitalizes the central city neighborhood in Warren off the ground;

• Amanda Colbert of Warren is a board member of Team Sanders Inc., a nonprofit group that provides after-school programs and focuses on community involvement, and she started Colbert’s Care, a group of people dedicated to community service;

• Shirley Frazier of Southington is director of the food pantry at Grace United Methodist Church on Drexel Avenue NW in Warren, a job she has given her time toward for 10 years. Frazier, a retired nurse, also volunteers at St. Joe’s at the Mall, a full-service health and wellness center of St. Joseph Warren Hospital;

• William H. Gore of Cortland is a U.S. Army veteran who as a member of the American Legion Post 540 in Cortland served as post chairman for the American Legion Buckeye Boys State. Gore also serves as chaplain for the Vietnam veterans chapter in Warren and is an active member of the Trumbull County Honor Guard;

• Elliott Heckman of Warren repairs bicycles and gives them to the Salvation Army to distribute to kids at Christmas;

• Lou Lepro of Warren is vice president of the Trumbull Deanery of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. In that capacity, Lepro, in part, manages the kitchen and dining hall and oversees and helps the volunteers. In addition, he helped form the Historical Perkins Homestead Neighborhood Association;

• James McFarland of Warren served and serves on several local boards, including the Warren-Trumbull County Public Library board, which he has been a member of for 20 years. McFarland also is on the Base Community Council at the Youngstown Air Reserve Station;

Dr. Farid Naffah of Cortland created the Avamar Foundation, which helps the elderly needy population pay for medication. Each year since 2010, he has hosted a fundraiser to raise money for the foundation; and

James Shuttic of Warren is president of the board of directors of the Fine Arts Council of Trumbull County, a role that lets him develop events to give artists a chance to show their work. An artist, Shuttic has created and helped install a variety of public art projects in the Garden District of Warren. Make sure to stop by the Fine Arts Council page on Facebook to give em a like.

“On behalf of Trumbull 100, we would like to congratulate all of the recipients of the Community Star award this year,” said Jordan Taylor, president of Trumbull 100. “Trumbull 100, in co-sponsorship with the Tribune Chronicle, are proud to be able to highlight the best in community service Trumbull County has to offer.”

Full profiles of each person will be featured in a special section that will be published March 22 in the Tribune Chronicle.

Tickets for the banquet at St. Demetrios Community Center in Warren are available at the newspaper office, 240 Franklin St. SE, by phone or by an order form that will run frequently in the pages of the Tribune Chronicle. For more information, contact Shafer at sshafer@tribtoday.com or at 330-841-1696.

The event is open to the community and the Mahoning Valley Podcast salutes all the winners this year for demonstrating and modeling the best in human nature here in our Valley.

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Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 22 Performing Arts Edition Transcript

Please listen, download, or subscribe here.

Performing Arts Edition. Wellness Wednesdays beginning at Salem Public Library. Valentines music with the Boardman Public Library. Artists of the Rust Belt Winter Market this Weekend.

Wednesdays at the Public Library in Salem can be the beginning of a healthier you. Starting tomorrow, The Wellness Wednesday monthly program series will feature a variety of topics related to better health and wellness.

Beginning at 6:30pm in the Quaker Meeting Room, the focus will be on “How to Build Your Healthiest Heart”. Included in the informal program to be presented by registered, licensed dietician/nutritionist Bridget Lackey, will be healthy tips, recipes and latest trends in heart health.

Online registration is required on the Library Website at www.salem.lib.oh.us , by calling the library at 330-332-0042, by emailing to library@salem.lib.oh.us or by stopping in at 821 E. State St., Salem, Ohio.

Ms. Lackey is Community Health Educator at Mercy Health in Youngstown, Ohio where she focuses on increasing the intake and availability of fresh, local fruits and vegetables especially within the food deserts of Youngstown and Warren. She is a Youngstown State University graduate.

Join the library for this Wellness Wednesday program that is open to the public and free of cost to attend. Include the programming, materials and services available at Salem Public Library to help you lead a healthier life.

Today we talk about many of the Performing Arts Organizations in the Mahoning Valley. Although I am not sure if such a thing exists, we are probably coming up on what may be called the Theater Season here in the Valley and these Organizations put in a lot of work to keep the Art of Performing live in front of an audience alive here in the valley.

We will talk about some that have been around for a while and who have a large following here in the Valley and shine the spotlight on some that you may not have heard of. I am guessing that the YSU College of Communications and the Creative Arts has a moderate following. Click on this link in the show notes to find out more.

I see from their site that starting on February 24th, they will be putting on a musical play by Ernst Toller called “No More Peace”. Briefly, it is a play about a bet between St Francis of Assisi and Napoleon that humans on Earth are so enamored with the drama and tragedy of war, that when the people of earth have no war, they will believe anything to start one. Apparently this is a comic satire that includes music and speaks to larger truths such as people will follow the loudest voice and the dangerous ways in which people define their enemies. Although it was written in 1935, it seems to be still relevant considering current events.

I am also thinking that there are some Opera buffs here in the Mahoning Valley as well. As we do actually have our own Opera Company. Opera Western Reserve. According to their website, Encouraged by the success of Madama Butterfly at Youngstown State University and a dinner theater production of La Traviata presented by the Youngstown Opera Guild in Stambaugh Auditorium’s Grand Ballroom, a dedicated group of opera lovers decided to create Youngstown’s own opera company. Invited by Stambaugh Auditorium to present their productions on the main stage, Opera Western Reserve made its debut with a fully-staged production of I Pagliacci on November 12, 2004. The fledgling company was fortunate enough to attract the talents of Susan Davenny Wyner, conductor of the Warren Philharmonic Orchestra and with a background that included singing with the Metropolitan Opera Company, to become its musical director. David Vosburgh, whose credits included both opera and Broadway musicals and was directing the spring operas at Youngstown State University, came on board as Production Director.

The mission of Opera Western Reserve was to create a professional company that was truly regional in its outreach. Singers residing in the Western Reserve area, which included Northeastern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania, were to be given priority in casting. Collaborations with other arts organizations such as Youngstown State University’s Dana School of Music, The Youngstown Connection, The Girard City Schools Youth Chorus, The Stambaugh Chorus, Ballet Western Reserve, and Salem Youth Chorus have been fostered. The artistic and support staff continues to be drawn from local theater artists and craftsmen. Most recently, we were delighted to have Youngstown native, Lawrence Brownlee, of the Metropolitan Opera as our guest artist for 2012’s production of The Barber of Seville. The cast included Randa Rouweyha, also a Youngstown native, and local singers Brian Keith Johnson, Jason Budd, Timothy Bruno, and former Young Artists Diana Farrell and Robert Pierce.

As Opera Western Reserve considers itself primarily an educational institution, the creation of a Young Artists Company has been very important. This troupe of six to eight singers and accompanists take their educational outreach program, Fun with Opera, to schools in the Tri-county area. This program has been completely underwritten and is offered at no charge. These singers also appear in concert for various local organizations and play supporting roles in our Main Stage productions.

If you figure you have the chops to sing Opera, Opera Western Reserve will be holding auditions for their 2017 production of Lucia di Lammermoor and their 2018 productions of Porgy & Bess and Madam Butterfly. Auditions will be held May 1st – 2nd, 2017 on the stage at Stambaugh Auditorium by appointment only.

Please send a headshot, cover letter, and resumé via U.S. Mail to: Opera Western Reserve, 1000 Fifth Ave. Youngstown, OH 44504. Once selected to audition you must submit a nonrefundable $15 accompanist fee as well as a list of your audition selections. Please prepare three arias in French, Italian, and English. The deadline to apply for an audition slot is April 17, 2017. For further information you may contact Marisa Zamary by calling (330)480-0693 or emailing admasst@operawesternreserve.org.

I can tell you that I will not be auditioning this year. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t. Heck you may well be able to get a part.

Meals on Wheels PSA

If you are looking to get your romance on for Valentines Day, head on over to the Boardman Pulbic Library on February 9 at 7PM. There will be a Chamber Music performed free for your listening pleasure.

I have mentioned this on previous episodes, but it stands to mention again. Our Library here in Mahoning County is a fantastic resource that is constantly putting on events and offering classes and activities for all ages. And many of them are free. Click here and check out their calendar so you can find some things to do with your family or by yourself.

Lets get back to some performing arts organizations here in the Valley. Did you know that we have a world class Dance Academy that also puts on performances right here in the Mahoning Valley? Well we do. The Stage Left Theater Arts Academy. According to their website, Because they are a Performance Company and not just a comp team, dancers will be asked to perform at a variety of local events throughout the season as well as attend 4-5 regional/local dance competitions. They will be attending a National event in the summer of 2017.

Dancers are required to attend a weekly ballet class, a weekly jazz or lyrical class as well as a weekly technique/flexibility class. In addition, classes are then scheduled based on the routines they are selected to dance. Weekends are family times at SDLA, but we may have occasional rehearsals on a Saturday morning or Sunday evening, especially if your dancer wants to do a solo, duet, or trio for comp. We are ideally looking to have a 2-3 days per week dance schedule…depending on the number of routines you dancer dances. The minimum dance days per week is 2. (Wednesday night is a huge company rehearsal night with many classes). The minimum dance classes for performance company is 4. There is a cap for tuition and families get huge discounts for multiple dancers.

As part of a traditional comp team, dancers train for months before ever hitting the stage, and when they do lots of tricks they tend to score higher to win a trophy. As part of the Stage Left Performance Company, they are artists first. All of their choreographers have professional dance experience. Their mission is to serve our community through dance and prepare our dancers for life and a professional career in dance, should they want that. They are the only pre professional dance company in Trumbull and Mahoning County!

The dancers perform nearly every month of the calendar year! They receive an unmatched resume in this community to use on their college applications and future auditions. A performance company GIVES pre-professional EXPERIENCE and the dancers are expected to be of the highest level of self respect and maturity to handle the pressures of performing, not just for a competition win, but for people counting on you to entertain at their event. Dancers learn how to be professional.

They also compete 4-5 times locally at dance competitions and have won Most Entertaining of the Day and Highest Scores of the day, year after year. They are not perfect or better, do not have critical spirits or COMPETITION toward one another, anger outbursts, arguments, or gossip on our teams or with our parents. If and when pockets of this behavior arises, it is dealt with respectfully and in love, with the hope that the dance relationships are more important than our needs to be right. We get past things quickly. Our girls can say they are sorry, our moms do not hold grudges, no one bad mouths anyone else when angered or afterward. This is strictly enforced, and unfortunately people have learned this the hard way at Stage Left. We are NOT a reality show.

You can follow them on facebook here. Or instagram here.

Another Dance Studio located in downtown Youngstown is the Ballet Western Reserve. Offering many different styles as well, they are in the business of preparing students for professional experience.

You can click the link above or follow them on facebook here.

Our area also offers a number of Community Theaters who bring live theater to the masses. In Columbiana County, the Salem Community Theatre has been putting on productions for an entire season that started last autumn. Coming up in February and March are 2 productions that are sure to bring some pleasure to your life. If you want to see a show, make sure to follow them on Facebook with the link above. Here is a little on what you can expect when you see a show there.

If you are planning to see your first show at SCT, welcome! Salem Community Theatre is a proud supporter of the arts located in the center of historic downtown Salem, Ohio. They put on six main stage productions each season (Fall to Summer) as well as special events, revues, and receptions

Performances generally include a 7:30 p.m. show on Friday and Saturday as well as a Sunday matinee at 2:00 p.m. Guests are encouraged to arrive early in order to pick up tickets and find their seats. Volunteer ushers will be present to guide you to your seat as well as answer any questions you may have. There is no dress code for the shows, so whether you’re coming from work, school, or play, they encourage you to come on in!

Don’t forget to stop by the concession stand. They offer concessions at each show including candy, popcorn, and drinks at reasonable prices. They are available for purchase before the show begins as well as during intermission.

They would be glad you have interest in seeing an SCT production, and would like to extend the invitation to support Salem’s one and only live theatre organization. No matter your background, the arts can be an enriching experience, and we hope you will become part of our theatre family.

The Salem Community Theatre is among the efforts of the Salem Community Foundation. According to their website, the foundation is a public non-profit charitable trust with a mission to improve the quality of life in Salem, Ohio, and the immediate area. The Foundation, through special grants, supports charitable, educational, scientific, literary, artistic, and civic efforts, as well as public safety, welfare, and recreational programs in Salem. The mission of the Community Foundation is to assess and meet changing community needs and interests through financial awards, and to assist donors to build and preserve enduring assets for charitable purposes.

Trumbull County has the Trumbull New Theatre. According to their website, TNT originally was organized in January 1948 as an offshoot of a YWCA study group supervised by Mrs. Stephen (Dorothy) Gmucs. As the desire grew for a theatre group, Mrs. Thorn (Frances) Pendleton was contacted for assistance. She agreed but, unsure of the chances for survival of such a group in Warren, strict standards were established including the principle of being self-supporting. TNT is not and has never been subsidized, it has always been self-supporting.

Those early meetings and rehearsals required everyone to put a quarter in a kitty until enough was collected to finance an evening of one acts. In May 1948, with $60 TNT was underway with the first production – in the Pendleton living room! During the first 9 years the group wandered from private living room to church auditorium, to a Main Street loft, to school auditoriums. Then, in 1955, the land on Youngstown Road was purchased for $3,750.

Designed by member-architect Tom Schroth, construction of the Playhouse began in the fall of 1956, built by the members—a labor of love! It included the auditorium, stage, light bridge, inner lobby and restrooms, with an initial cost of a little over $25,000. Since the formal opening in the spring of 1957, additions and improvements have cost in excess of $250,000. These include retirement of the original mortgage, purchase of additional land, outer lobby, landscaping, new seats, the workshop (dressing room, bathrooms, wardrobe, prop storage, office and set construction area), a new auditorium roof and annual permanent set, lighting and sound equipment upgrades.

In the early 90’s the parking lot was paved and air conditioning was added, allowing the theatre to be used year-round. In November 2005 the wheelchair accessibility project was completed, at a cost of $35,000.

Income from ticket sales and contributions by patrons, members, friends and area businesses provide for all expenses incurred by the productions, general maintenance and improvement programs as they become necessary. Since 1975 TNT has annually provided scholarships to Trumbull County students.

The organization is run primarily on volunteerism. Only the cleaning staff is paid, along with stipends for the volunteer directors and musicians. Many of the directors and actors have received their training within TNT. The Women’s Committee lends major support to the patron drive and fund-raising activities.

TNT is a COMMUNITY Theatre that is open to everyone! Ever thought you would like to act, sing, direct, pound a nail, paint a set, sew a hem, usher or participate in any way? Contact them on facebook for more information.

To receive the company newsletter, Curtain Call, just leave your name and address at the Box Office. This publication keeps you informed of “what’s happening” with the group and when auditions and help are needed.

Of course, this area offers a tremendous variety of live music jut about every night of the week. One of our local resident maintain an exceptional website for more information about local musicians, venues and gigs here in the Mahoning Valley.

I have had a chance to peruse this site and it is comprehensive. Although I am not sure how long Steve Mahoning has been running this thing, it is an incredible compendium of local live music information that dates back to 2007. According to their website, In January of 2007 Steve searched for any websites listing shows by local bands.

He was surprised to find that none were online, and that the only existing sources were the limited schedules in the local newspapers. He decided to fill the void himself, and created an internet site he named Mahoning Valley Live Music and posted the pages to his personal Road Runner internet space.

Mahoning Valley Live Music was transferred to its current domain, http://mvlivemusic.com (and the web URL http://www.mvlivemusic.com) in early February 2007. His original intent was to create a site consolidating information on all musicians/bands in the Mahoning Valley, and all their scheduled performances. This primary purpose has not changed. Mahoning Valley Live Music supports local musicians performing live music. MVLiveMusic is the oldest existing site of its kind in the Valley, with the most complete and accurate listing of local nightclub musicians and their shows.

Reach out to Steve Mahoning on facebook if you like. To be fair, I am not sure if that is his real name, but if it is; then it must have been meant to be. And by all means, check out the website and find some live music to go out and support.

This small sampling of the Performing Arts Organizations here in the Mahoning Valley is not meant to be comprehensive. That is why we have Google. I do encourage you to check out the vibrant variety of Performing Arts that we have here in the Mahoning Valley and get out and support them. The Arts are what gives a community breath and life. So get out there and have some fun and be entertained.

And while you are at it, support some of our local artists this weekend at the Winter Market at B&O Station in downtown Youngstown on Saturday, February 11th 11-5pm. A great place to pick up some handmade gifts from your local artists right before Valentine’s Day. Art, food and beer…what more could you need for an excellent Saturday afternoon! Don’t miss it, support your local artists in 2017!

Click the link above for more information.

WWF PSA

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 9 Transcript

Listen to it here.

Today on Mahoning Valley Podcast, Save your money, Public Library Resources and Kwanzaa, Continuing the destruction, Boardman UPS Grinch, Holiday Generosity to the Salvation Army

Save your money this Holiday and wait until next week to do your shopping. Why? Because it is inevitable that the places where you get your gifts are going to be offering the best prices of the year in most cases a few days after the big holiday windup. If you have never noticed this trend, then go on out to your favorite department store next week when the retailers show their desperation to get those last few dollars in their coffers to close the fiscal year. According to Deal News

There are seven categories or items you can save a lot of money on next week. Please be advised that this section does contain affiliate links to Amazon to help offset the cost of producing this podcast. So if you like what you are hearing and need some of these items, please go ahead and get them and it will help you and this effort.

Clothing

Apparel deals dominate after-Christmas sales. Last year, some of our most popular sales during that time included discounts of up to 70% up at Nordstrom, Amazon, Columbia, and H&M. And don’t forget the Victoria’s Secret Semi-Annual Sale, which often (including last year) lands right at the end of December. Winter coats, hats, and gloves will see even deeper discounts now than they did during Black Friday. In 2015, post-Christmas sales went as high as 70% off select items with most discounts around 40% or 50%, plus additional discounts on clearance items.

Cameras

While we’ll see all manner of tech discounts after Christmas, camera deals are what really impress us this month. We found that 31% of after-Christmas camera deals were Editors’ Choice last year. And remember, there’s still plenty of things your phone can’t do that a camera can.

About 31% of the camera deals found in after-Christmas sales will be of Editors’ Choice quality.

If you really want to maximize the value of your camera purchase, consider a refurb. The best deals we see are factory-refurbished units from Canon, Nikon, and more. These items, restored to almost-new condition and backed by manufacturer warranties, are even preferred by some experts.

Audio Gear

Headphone and home theater deals will be on fire after Christmas; in years past, 41% checked in as Editors’ Choice. However, true audiophiles will have to continue paying top dollar: We don’t typically see high-end gear at Editors’ Choice prices this late in the year. Expect bargains on entry-level to mid-tier options from brands like Pioneer, Sony, Polk, Klipsch, and Beats. This is also another area to check out refurb products, especially if you’re looking for Polk, Beats, and Bose.

Sports and Fitness Gear

Retailers love to take advantage of those New Years’ resolutions to get in shape by offering deals on sports and fitness equipment. While we don’t necessarily see more deals or all-time lows after Christmas, we definitely saw better sitewide discounts from a range of stores.

Last year, stores like Dick’s Sporting Goods, Groupon, and Sears had after-Christmas discounts of 25% to 50% on select sporting and fitness goods, sometimes on top of clearance discounts.

We’re particularly excited about Sears this year, which is likely to offer big deals to offset lackluster performance this year. Last year, Sears offered lots of deals on NordicTrack, so keep an eye out if you want a treadmill or an incline trainer. Plus, NordicTrack has its own New Year’s sale, cutting 40% to 60% off select items.

This is also traditionally a good time to get deals on gym memberships. Be sure your deal includes no upfront fees, and at least one month free. You can easily negotiate these freebies if they aren’t included in the plan.

Video Games

This will be a great time to stock up on your favorite video game titles, especially for older systems. Even better than audio equipment and cameras, a whopping 56% of video game deals are expected to be Editors’ Choice during the upcoming after-Christmas sales. Last year, we saw Assassin’s Creed for Xbox 360 from $5, and Xbox One games from $6.

Christmas Decorations

We know you want to enjoy your motorcycle-riding Santa now, but the best time of year to buy Christmas decorations from a savings perspective is the day after Christmas. On December 26, prices on holiday decor will drop 40% to 75% at stores like Lowe’s, Home Depot, Target, and Pottery Barn.

Last year, inflatable lawn ornaments were the best bet, with inflatable Christmas Yoda and Darth Vader options each marked down by about $15 to $30. We’re hoping the force is with us, and these deals will be back this year.

Hatchimals

If you’ve promised your kiddo this season’s hottest toy and haven’t bought it yet, then you don’t have many options: You’ll have to pay hundreds of dollars on eBay, if you can find one at all.

But if you can convince your little one that Santa is bringing Hatchimals in February this year, the toys will likely be back in stock and down to normal prices ($50) once the manufacturer has had a chance to make more and the craze has diminished. On a personal note, I cannot imagine why anyone would want one of these hatchimals. I understood the Pet Rock as it never spoils the carpet or wakes you up with it’s butt in your face or needs $1000.00 in Grooming. But a hatchimal?

Make a Wish PSA

Here is something many people never think about, but our Public Library in Mahoning County is a wonderful source of information and free events. Coming up next week for instance in a number of different branches; there will be reading with your baby sessions to get them up to speed on the ever important skill of reading. Events for adults like learning how to access ebooks and online resources there and even Blood Drives with the Red Cross and a Kwanzaa Celebration.

On a personal note, I have often thought that Kwanzaa is one of those winter holidays that makes a lot of sense. What better way to wrap up a year then to reinforce seven values that all have the potential to make our or anyone’s community a much nicer place to live. Among these values, Unity, Economic Cooperation, Faith, Purpose and Creativity. If we all celebrated Kwanzaa, it is my opinion that the world would be a much better place to live and work in.

On a much sadder note according to the Vindicator, a deep injection well will be permitted to reopen in Weathersfield Township. The destruction of this earth continues to line the pockets of irresponsible and greedy persons who will someday give account for their actions. More than two years after the Ohio Department of Natural Resources shut down a deep injection well in Weathersfield Township because of small earthquakes, a judge has ordered the state to allow it to reopen.

Judge Kimberly Cocroft of Franklin County Common Pleas Court issued a decision Friday that orders ODNR and American Water Management Services, owner of the well, to submit a proposed entry setting forth the parameters under which the well will reopen.

Specifically, the judge said the entry should address the amount of oil and gas drilling waste that will be injected initially into the well, the injection pressures to be used and how they will “incrementally increase the volume and pressure while simultaneously providing constant monitoring for seismicity.”

Guess what? Even if these things are monitored it does not change two facts about deep well injection and fracking. These practices are destructive and dangerous. Any manipulation of resources that are offered by nature is going to have a deleterious effect on the quality of life for all of us. It is logical to assume that if you inject toxins into our environment they will not just go away, They will start to leach into the water and the ground and effect anything that uses that water or earth. That means food supplies and water supplies will be contaminated. People wonder why Cancer has been on the rise despite our efforts to curtail it. It is directly related in my opinion to the toxins that the Industrial Revolution has produced and deposited in our environment.

Then in the usual antiholiday spirit the Vindicator also reported that someone has been playing the Grinch at the Boardman UPS Store.

Police are investigating a theft at the UPS store at 143 Boardman-Canfield Road, the second theft reported at the store this week, both involving Christmas gifts.

A woman told police she mailed a package containing $920 in cash and various other gifts to family Dec. 12. By monitoring the tracking number, she determined the package never left the facility.

The woman followed up on Dec. 20, and the store manager told the woman UPS security would open an investigation. She will pursue charges, according to the report. On a related story, A family decided it would not pursue criminal charges against a former UPS employee for taking $650 from Christmas cards an elderly woman was sending money to her grandchildren. That report was made with police Tuesday.

So I guess this just goes to show that Corporate America is still refusing to pay a living wage to people. Well that and people in general can have a tendency to look out only for themselves. Of course corporate greed is no excuse for engaging in criminal acts and stealing from people. In fact there is not an excuse for such a thing. It is despicable. If you don’t like your lot in life or the wges you earn, go get another job or figure out a way to live on what you make. As a reminder people get what they give. So if you are not getting what you want; try giving a little more and see if it comes back to you. It will.

St Jude PSA

And now onto someone who definitely gets it. According to WKBN Channel 27 our local CBS affiliate, For the fifth year in a row, a generous donor dropped gold coins in a few Salvation Army buckets in Mahoning County. The Salvation Army received a fourth gold coin in its bucket at the Poland Giant Eagle late Thursday night. It’s a 1 ounce pure gold Canadian Maple Leaf.

“We are pleased by this generous donation and we wish to express our gratitude to the donor,” said Major Elijah Kahn, Mahoning County Area Coordinator. “It will help us narrow the gap in our fundraising deficit this year as we approach the finish line.” Three 1 ounce gold coins were discovered in three of its kettles across the area on Wednesday. A Canadian Maple Leaf was dropped in a kettle at Canfield Giant Eagle, a South Africa Krugerrand coin and a Grant Wood American Arts Commemorative Series coin were dropped in kettles at the Giant Eagle in Austintown. The donor remains anonymous and left no note or information.

And that is the way to do it. I know that I gave a shoutout to Owens Construction last episode for sponsoring a Holiday Party at Youngstown Community School

And I believe that it is good to give recognition to people who do things that are worthy of mention, but the fact of the matter is, that it is the things that people do in secret that are the most valuable in my opinion. Not the things that people do in the public eye to get themselves attention for the good works they do, but the things that we do in private when no one is watching or paying attention that sometimes have the most value. There are some people who would say that integrity is not about what you do when you know people are watching but about the things that we do in private. I would also go so far as to say that if you are going to engage in charitable acts; doing it without recognition demonstrates far greater generosity and character.

WWF PSA