Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 36

Download this from Soundcloud

Get different kinds of audio files from the Internet Archive.

Final Autism Run-registration-2017-page-001

You are invited to be part of an exciting community event. On April 22, 2017, the Autism Society of Mahoning Valley will be hosting the 4th Annual Valley Autism 5K & 2 nd Annual Family FUN WALK for Autism. Get over to their facebook page and show them some love.

2017 Valley Autism 5K & Walk Donation Packet 2-7-17

Event Poster 3-13-17 – Autism Society-5k run-flyer-2017

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control recently revised its statistics on the occurrence of autism in America to state that one in 68 children (and 1 in 54 boys) are affected. There are more than 60,000 families in Ohio with children and adults and their families affected by autism; the largest percentage of whom reside in NE Ohio.

From the newly diagnosed child to the school aged children to the severely disabled autistic adult. These are all our families and they need our help.

The Mahoning Valley chapter of the Autism Society of America was founded by local families in 1989 to supporting families in Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana counties. Its mission is to improve the quality of life for families living with an ASD diagnosis, and to bring about community change and opportunities for individuals working through life with this disability. Our volunteers are dedicated to accomplishing this through information and referral, family support, advocacy, raising awareness and resource development.

What do we really do? Here’s a typical morning call: A mother is driving home having just received the news that her 3-year-old was diagnosed as being on the Autism Spectrum. She is scared and sad. She doesn’t know what this means short term or long term for her child. Where to send them to school? What early intervention therapies does he need? How do I get funding for therapies and other services? Are there other mothers I can talk to about this? What do I do RIGHT NOW?

This is where the Autism Society shines. In our role as the autism “bridge organization” we are uniquely driven to work with all of the schools, therapy centers, support groups, community organizations and government agencies to bring together the necessary resources for families. In addition to direct calls for information and referral, we host educational, awareness activities to shine a spotlight on the many facets of ASD and the issues faced by children, adults with someone one the spectrum.

These include:

  • autism family social events and neighbor-to- neighbor support;
  • Seasonal events like Caring Santa, Sensitive Bunny and Family Portrait photo sessions;
  • Collaborative programs like Sensory Nights at the Oh WOW! Children’s Museum and at area libraries;
  • Resource programs like Community Autism & Disability Resource Fair; and,
  • Camp F.R.I.E.N.D, our summer day camp, known for welcoming neurotypical peers and creating community
  • immersion for participants.

This is why we need your support. What can you do? Quality programming like this can cost upward of $75,000/year.

At this time we are seeking fun family prizes to motivate our community businesses and family teams to raise money as part of our event, much like a Relay for Life event. Businesses will create teams in order to show their support of our local families. Families will create teams to support and rally behind their family member with Autism. Prizes such as gift certificates to local restaurants, museums, trampoline parks, movie theatres etc. will be prizes for families who raise the most money for the event.

We also need donations of bottled water, granola bars, fruit, donuts or anything else that would be great for our 5K runners and/or for our families. We also are offering several levels of sponsorship if you would like to have a bigger presence at our event. Details can be found at ValleyAutism5K.com. If you’d like to contribute, but in a way not listed, please let us know. Any funds raised by this event stay local and support our families in need.

Community-Art-Logo-Web-2x-1

Tomorrow head downtown to the Soap Gallery for a community Arts Discussion. This discussion will be a town hall style discussion targeting the visual arts, related events, planned projects, and open discussion about arts in Youngstown. We welcome all Youngstown Community groups to discuss and present what they have going on currently and for the upcoming year.

If you plan to present during the talk please have your input written down and limited to 5-10 minutes.
Please invite other artists, community members, and those who have interest in the the visual arts in Youngstown. Street Parking is available in front of the Soap Gallery on South Champion.

Please message the Soap Gallery for any questions

Seniors in the Mahoning Valley need our help to eat today and every day. Join Mario Andretti and volunteer with Meals on Wheels Mahoning Valley. And please head on over to their facebook page and show them some love.

dress for success

According to the Vindicator, The Dress to Succeed Ministry celebrated its latest expansion with the grand opening of its showroom location at the Community Corrections Association building on the South Side.

Elder Rose Carter, founder and director of the ministry; Lola Simmons, executive director of the Home for Good Re-entry Resource Referral Center; David Stillwagon, chief executive officer of CCA; and Mayor John A. McNally, cut the ribbon yesterday for the latest boutique-style showrooms inside the Graphics Building of the CCA facility, 1507 Market St.

“The city of Youngstown fully supports these initiatives because once people come out [of prison], we don’t want them to come back in, and we want to give them the help they need,” the mayor said.

The ministry has been dedicated to providing donated clothes, shoes and other accessories for Youngstowners, with an emphasis on people returning from prison, since 2010. Carter said this addition further helps the goal of providing something for people who need it the most.

According to the Tribune Chronicle, Stephanie Parish said she remembers when she was a student at Niles McKinley High School, she competed in the Youngstown State University History Day event. Now as a social studies teacher at Windham Junior High School, she has her seventh- and eighth-grade students creating projects for History Day.

The YSU History Day will be 9 a.m. Saturday at Kilcawley Center and DeBartolo Hall at the campus. The 2017 theme is “Taking a Stand in History.” Program coordinator Dr. Diane Barnes and AmeriCorps Ohio History Regional Officer M. Carmella Cadusale are coordinating the YSU event

Schools in Ashtabula, Geauga, Mahoning, Portage and Trumbull represent Region 4 which will be part of the competition. According to their Facebook Event Page, Ohio History Day is a year-long research program for students in grades 4 – 12. Students who choose to showcase their work, compete at the school, regional, and state level with an opportunity to advance to nationals. Contests are free to attend and many aspects of the judging are open to the public.

TakingaStandinHistory_2017-1-282x300-282x300

Ohio History Day is an affiliate of National History Day (NHD), an exciting program that makes history come alive for students. Students learn history by doing history. Students conduct historical research that leads to imaginative exhibits, documentaries, original performances, websites and scholarly papers. NHD reinforces classroom teaching by rewarding students of all abilities for their scholarship, individual initiative and cooperative learning.

National History Day began as a small, local contest in Cleveland, Ohio in 1974. Dr. David Van Tassel and members of the Department of History at Case Western Reserve University created the program to reinvigorate the teaching and learning of history in elementary and secondary schools. The program quickly expanded throughout Ohio and surrounding Midwestern states. With support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, National History Day (NHD) became a national program in 1980.

Now, more than 600,000 students and participate in National History Day from every state in the Union, Washington, D.C. and the U.S. territories, and the program continues to expand internationally.

National History Day received the 2011 National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama. The National Humanities Medal is awarded to individuals or institutions “whose work has deepened the nation’s understanding of the humanities, broadened our citizens’ engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans’ access to important resources in the humanities.”

NHD is supported by volunteers who coordinate its state and local programs. Thousands of people support the program by serving as contest judges, workshop presenters, mentors and advisers to students and teachers. On the local and state levels professionals based at colleges and universities, historical agencies and educational organizations serve as state and district coordinators to direct the History Day programs in their areas. The Ohio History Connection is proud to be the state sponsor of the National History Day program in Ohio since 1995.

According to the Tribune Chronicle, John Diehl knew there was something special about Sara Price’s basketball game. He saw her promise in middle school.

Price, a 6-foot-1 senior guard/forward, exuded that effort throughout high school, and it made her Northeast Inland District Player of the Year the past two seasons. She’s been the face of the Tigers girls basketball program and is heading to Ball State University next season.

best of the best

Before Price travels to Muncie, Ind., she’ll look back on her biggest honor to date — the Trumbull County Coaches Association girls basketball player of the year. Price picked up the wooden base with a golden basketball attached atop the award Monday at the 30th annual Trumbull County Basketball Banquet at Leo’s Ristorante.

Price, who averaged 21 points, eight rebounds, 2.2 assists and 2.1 steals as a senior, is the eighth Howland player to receive the award and seventh under current Tigers coach John Diehl.

Bristol’s Jeff Kassan won the honor while Diehl coached the Panthers in the early-to-mid 1990s. Taylor Williams last won it for Howland in 2012.

“This is something I can go back when I have summer camp and say hey, ‘You can win this award if you work hard,’ “ Diehl said. “I can pick out the things that I think can win it when they get to this age. Sara could (do them) in the seventh, eighth grade. It takes a lot of work to win it.”

This TCCA title goes next to her 1,000-point basketball and the net she cut down when Howland won the All-American Conference, Red Tier Championship.

“Every time I look at it, I’m reminiscing in the past,” Price said of the TCCA trophy. “It’s amazing. It’s a huge, beautiful trophy. The fact that I have it, I can’t even put words to it. It’s such an awesome feeling.”

Diehl already knew Price was a special player before high school. She took the next step by improving her game her freshman season — learning to shoot.

“It’s the smoothness of her shot,” Diehl said. “She shot real low when she was little. She was coachable because she brought her shot up and got it above her head.

“The one thing too, that kids are coachable.”

Price knows this TCCA honor doesn’t solely define her legacy and future at Ball State, but it’s nice to have.

She listened to Monday’s guest speaker, University of Akron associate women’s basketball coach Melissa Jackson. Jackson spoke of the hard work she had to do to get through college and in her coaching career.

“Girls from college have these huge honors,” Price said. “They don’t know the amount of work they have to put in. I put a lot of work into it. I’m ready for it. It’s a job in college.

“Having this under my belt is a dream come true.”

Like my page on Facebook.

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 34

Subscribe to this Podcast on Feedburner.

Download it from Soundcloud.

Need different types of Audio Files to download or listen to, Get them from the Internet Archive.

Do you love the Mahoning Valley? Well you are not alone. In fact, a group of entrepreneurs and community leaders who love the Valley are launching a Mobile App at a Free Launch Party that will focus on community involvement and will provide a fun interactive tool to connect individuals with organizations in service to our community.

Downtown Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley PodcastThe party will include an uplifting atmosphere with light food, beverages and prizes for volunteers. Short presentations by area leaders will take place every 30 minutes. Speakers including the Mayor of Youngstown (John McNally) and Jim Cossler (of the YBI) will encourage community involvement and touch on topics like Education, Area Improvements, Economic Development, Unity, and the importance of our faith communities.

Click here to lean more about who we are and about our Mobile App.

This event will be open to the public (no admission required). We are also extending special invitations to many Area Leaders, Non-Profit Organizations and local news channels.

March 30th, 2017, 5pm – 7pm (RSVP below)

Tyler History Center, 325 W Federal St, Youngstown, OH

How You Can Help: Attend the event and spread the word to others by sharing our website and on Facebook. Click here to like their page on Facebook. And RSVP by March 26th and Register as a Love This Place Volunteer for a chance to win one of three $100 Amazon Gift Cards. Must be present at the Launch Party on March 30th to win.

This is the Mahoning Valley Podcast and it occurred to me that there a plenty of people here who may want to do a segment. Who may want to have their voice heard on a Podcast. Maybe you have an event or cause or just want to say hi to the Valley. This podcast was never meant to be all about me. It has been a work in progress. Well, it is your turn. If you want to record a segment and email it to me, I will consider adding it to an episode.

community-words

Because this is a community project, you must be a part of the Mahoning Valley or have some connection to the Valley. If you want to talk about your grandma or how you grew up in Struthers or what you favorite restaurant is, or favorite gym, or favorite bar, or favorite band or anything. It just needs to be about something or someone in the Mahoning Valley.

You may be thinking, how much is this going to cost me. Nothing. Nada. Just record on your phone. Record with your friends. Record on your laptop or tablet. Save the file as an MP3 and send it over. Send it over with any links or pictures you want to include. This is all about everyone here in the Valley. So give it a try. It is easy and free and will get your voice added to the Mahoning Valley Podcast Archive. Send as many as you want. Any topic. BUT, no bad language. I look forward to helping you be a part of the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

Connect with me on Twitter.

Like my page on Facebook.

Wickyards and the Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Service Monkeys at the Wickyards on March 23. Everyone knows how much I love Free Events. On Thursday at 7PM in downtown Youngstown at 711 Wick Ave, Nick Chicone’s (of The Service Monkeys) 21st Birthday Bash.

Featuring this lineup of local indie bands. I suspect this will be a fine display of our youth’s artistic musical aspirations.

The Service Monkeys – Energetic, indie punk from Boardman, OH http://theservicemonkeys.bandcamp.com

Morning In May– Catchy upbeat emo-influenced pop-punk from Akron, Ohio https://youtu.be/f5uuEXfCkv8

Three Vultures – Socially conscious, alternative from Lisbon, OH https://threevultures.bandcamp.com

Toolebox & The Crew – Folk punk from Bowerston, OH https://toolebox.bandcamp.com/releases

Special acoustic sets will be played outside in between sets by Askew_Painting, Dustin Cutwright, and Alex Richards http://alexrichardsmusic.bandcamp.com

This is a FREE show. Come celebrate Nick Chicone’s 21st birthday at 711 Wick Ave. Youngstown, OH

meals-on-wheels-logo_2

When you get old and get hungry and may be alone in this world, you are going to want someone to care. Well, you can show you care right now. Join Mario Andretti and do lunch with Meals on Wheels Mahoning Valley.

On March 24th, Tri Changes Salon in Girard celebrates its 25th Anniversary in business. And the celebration warrants a shoutout. 25 years in business with an all nighter by staying open for 25 hours straight starting March 24th! Our theme is mental health and suicide awareness.

They will meet at St. Rose Church parking lot at 4 o’clock Thursday. There will be guest speakers to uplift us. After they speak there will be a one mile balloon walk to honor those who have passed away. A counselor will be on hand to provide information on addiction, mental health issues, & bullying. We will have a balloon release and Bear Hugs following the walk.

Tri Changes Salon and the Mahoning Valley Podcast

Food will be provided at the Salon by Ianazone’s pizza in Niles. Temporary tattoos available for donation by Thad Minnick. Western Southern will be doing kid’s identikits. There will be a 50/50 raffle, Chinese auction & Paul Mitchell giveaway at the Salon. Money raised will be used to provide a Paul Mitchell the school Scholarship & also will be donated to the Emmanuel Center.

Be the 25th or 92nd client and receive a complimentary future service. Wear your PJ’s between the hours of 10pm and 10am to receive a candy bar with Tri Sweet savings. You could be a golden ticket winner. We will be accepting canned foods, treats, toys, and monetary donations for pets! Trumbull County Mental health/addiction help and information will be available at the Emmanuel Center from 8am to 4:30 pm on Friday.

Take a little nap and then head on over to the Box Gallery for a Multi and Mixed Media Art Show featuring Michael Long who is a Pennsylvania based artist that works in multi-media sculpture, painting and assemblage. His work has been on display at the Westmorland Museum of American Art along with various galleries, museums and private and permanent collections.

Life Sized Sculpture with the Box Gallery

He is a member of Associated artists of Pittsburgh and currently known for his large scale permanent installation project at the Station Medical Center Altoona, Pa. Michael is always looking to create new processes and use non traditional materials to put a twist on non traditional art. This will be Michael’s opening at the Box Gallery. This will be a free event to the public, with appetizers, drinks and music.

According to the Vindicator, Youngstown CityScape is celebrating its 20 th Anniversary this year. When Youngstown CityScape started Streetscape, a beautification program, it had about two dozen volunteers cleaning up a small part of downtown.

Streetscape will celebrate its 20th anniversary on June 3 with about 700 volunteers expected to clean up debris and plant flowers and shrubs in major sections of downtown and the surrounding areas.

“There’s been a transformation,” said Scott Schulick, Streetscape chairman and one of the original volunteers. “There wasn’t much pride in downtown 20 years ago. Trees and the landscape were overgrown and no one took care of downtown. Now we have a large group that has helped transform the look of downtown.”

“It’s grown exponentially,” added Sharon Letson, CityScape executive director. “When we started 20 years ago, there were two restaurants and a few businesses downtown. Our program and downtown have grown so much in 20 years.”

cityscapelogo_-tagline-01

Youngstown CityScape kicked off its fundraising drive Monday for its 20th annual Streetscape planting day at the YMCA of Youngstown’s Manchester Room with a breakfast.

The planting day is scheduled for 8 a.m. to noon June 3. This year’s theme is “20 Years: People + Vision + Action.” Volunteers will beautify downtown and surrounding areas by removing debris, trimming, planting flowers and shrubs, and mulching planted areas.

Project partners include the city, YSU, Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership Program, YSUScape, Community Corrections Association, Youngstown Metropolitan Housing Authority, Men’s Garden Club of Youngstown, St. Elizabeth Youngstown Hospital, Fifth Avenue Boulevard Neighbors, Crandall Park South Neighbors, 7th Ward Citizens Coalition, Garden District Neighborhood Association, Rocky Ridge Neighbors, Mahoning Commons Association and the Wick Park Neighborhood Association.

Because of the 20th anniversary, Letson said Streetscape is asking people to add $20 or 20 percent to their annual donation to the effort. CityScape usually raises about $50,000 annually for the Streetscape program, Letson said. To volunteer or donate, contact CityScape by phone at 330-742-4040, email at cityscapedirector@sbcglobal.net or go to its website: https://youngstowncityscape.org.

A Niles man has invented a green power machine and is looking forward to deploying a number of his Free Power Generators here in the Mahoning Valley. According to the Tribune Chronicle, Bob Jadloski describes himself as a professional photographer and tech guy, not an inventor.

Bob Jadloski and the FPG

Even so, Jadloski, whose Trumbull County Courthouse photograph adorns a wall inside the Washington, D.C., office of U.S. Rep. Timothy J. Ryan, D-Howland, has created a machine he says could “revolutionize the energy industry.”

Jadloski started developing the concept more than five years ago. In 2014, he moved what he calls the Free Pressure Generator from his home in Niles to the Oak Hill Collaborative’s Tech Hub in Youngstown.

“I have photography experience and I’m an IT (information technology), computer-tech person. I’m not an oil-and-gas guy. I’m not an inventor by trade and I wouldn’t call myself one,” the Warren native said. “I worked in advanced engineering at Delphi, but had nothing to do with gas or oil.”

Jadloski has been sharing his project with area groups, clubs and organizations as part of an ongoing effort to “get the word out,” garner support and potentially attract investors.

Recently, he unveiled the generator at a Warren Rotary meeting. He has also been invited to explain its workings at a future business pitch event of the Sundown Rundown group that helps entrepreneurs connect with the investors, mentors and talent they need “to help take their idea to the next step,” the group’s website states.

Jadloski said what he has now is a large, unfinished prototype or “beta unit that is nowhere near what it will look like” when he’s done.

He said although there have been engineers who have worked with him on the project at the Tech Hub, he needs a team to help him fine-tune specifications for his generator before he moves forward to sell it. His goal, he said, is to create a final product that is “friendly to the environment, an efficient, inexpensive way to produce green energy” and in the process promote economic development and create jobs.

“That’s what we should all want. Anyone who lives here in the Valley, we should all be working toward economic development,” Jadloski said. “The goal should always be to encourage people to stay here, not leave because we don’t have enough to offer them, we don’t have to jobs to keep them here. If we could have teams building FPGs, imagine what we could do.”

How it works

Fig9g

Basically, an FPG is anything that can spin a turbine and make electricity. The FPG is similar to a hydroelectric generator, which relies on flowing water on a dam, or hydropower, to produce electricity. But, Jadloski said, his FPG could easily rely on area natural-gas wells with the generator converting unused energy into electricity. The generator would be attached to a pressurized pipeline and the pressure from the gas lines would be used to run it.

“Since we have millions of miles of pipes running in the ground that have gas, water and sewage running in them, most are gravity flow, we could be harvesting the free energy from the flow of any of all of these sources,” Jadloski said. “The gas one is just the beginning. I envision in the future everyone would be able to have some form of a FPG connected to their house or business.

“This not the next windmill or solar panel. It’s utilizing what we already have right here in the Mahoning Valley and making the most of it.”

One generator has enough power to run 25 homes as long as there’s enough “flow and pressure” to run it, he said. “It’s clean and self-sufficient,” Jadloski said.

Pat Kerrigan, Tech Hub director, said the FPG could be a game-changer.

“This particular project is something I think has great potential,” he said. “The invention itself is a simple concept. It’s a great idea and a workable concept.”

Dave Hanson of Newton Falls, who is familiar with the FPG, said Jadloski “has a great idea. It’s just going to take the right person” to help him launch it.

“The thing is there are so many pressurized gas lines, a lot of these natural resources, in under-developed countries,” Hanson said. “Bob has come up with an idea that’s green. This could be an opportunity to provide electric to schools, clinics … it’s just such a simple idea that could really benefit a lot of lives.”

Show your support for this Community Project by sending me some money.

 

 

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 32

Bootlegger Edition

Subscribe with Feedburner

Download this Episode from the Internet Archive

Northeast Ohio is full of great entrepreneurial talent. If you have an idea and you want to make it happen, SunDown RunDown is the best place to showcase your idea and grab a beer while you’re there. Doors open at 5:30pm, pitches start by shortly after 6:00pm You have a little over a week to get your pitch in order to make a pitch as this will be occurring on March 22 at the Historic MVR.

Here’s how it works for those who pitch:

1) Before the event: Submit your idea to us on our site here. – you’ll actually hear back from us, no secret handshakes, no buddy, buddy shenanigans with us.

2) Register to Attend

3) We’ll schedule you to pitch at one of our events – and you better show up!

4) You pitch, get feedback on your idea, and maybe make a connection to help move your idea further. And we do this at night and we try to have 4 pitches during that time.

Here’s how it works for the audience:

1) Register to Attend

2) Give critical, but constructive feedback to the pitched business idea.

Sundown Rundown with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

A little about the Group who is sponsoring this event. SunDown Group has come a long way since it started offering business pitch events in Columbus in May of 2013. Our community has grown to over 1,350 individuals and our programs and services have expanded well beyond pitch events. We are helping entrepreneurs Connect, Do, Expand their businesses and Learn. Check out everything SunDown currently does to help out entrepreneurs everywhere.

This event is being held at the historic Casseses MVR on Walnut Street. This place is a landmark here in the Mahoning Valley. Started in 1927 by Carmine T. Cassese as a means of well, I am not sure exactly what they were doing there because I was not there. I could guess as 1927 was smack in the middle of the Prohibition Era in the United States and as soon as that failed experiment in representative democracy falied; MVR got one of the first Liquor Licenses in the State of Ohio.

Not that matters to me, but there is the possibility that Carmine was brewing up some fine beverages there at MVR. I know that we do not hear much about it these days, but there was a time when drinking was illegal. Can you imagine that? People having to break the law to drink?

Bootlegger Bust with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

Not only that, but there was quite a bit of drinking going on anyway. In fact, the term bootlegger was coined during this time. I am not alleging that anyone at MVR or anyone else did this. But, there were people here in the Valley who were so serious about getting drunk and getting other people drunk that according to Ohio History Central, “Many Ohio cities gained a reputation for lawlessness while Prohibition remained in effect. Toledo supposedly was a safe haven for mobsters and bootleggers from Chicago, Illinois, and Detroit, Michigan. Bootleggers from Kentucky smuggled alcohol into Cincinnati, Ohio, and then shipped the liquor to other communities in the state. It was rumored that law enforcement officials in Steubenville and Youngstown, Ohio, risked their very lives if they attempted to enforce Prohibition. Bootleggers did not exist only in Ohio.” That is a serious commitment to getting drunk there.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Idora Park was created as a result of a Street Car Company wanting to expand their business and get more riders on the weekends and in the evening. According to Rick Shale writing for the Mahoning Valley Historical Society, “In the mid-1890s streetcar companies across America looked for ways to increase ridership in the evenings and on the weekends when the regular commuter traffic slacked off. Locally, the Youngstown Park & Falls Street Railway Company held the franchise for routes south of the Mahoning River, and it decided to build an amusement park in the largely undeveloped south side of Youngstown.

Idora Park (for its first season known as Terminal Park) opened on Decoration Day, May 30, 1899, and was an immediate success. Ideally located adjacent to Mill Creek Park and sufficiently far from the smoke and dirt of the mills that lined the Mahoning River, the new park was about 3.5 miles from Youngstown’s Central Square—far enough to convince most people to pay a nickel and ride the streetcar to the park rather than walk.

Back Wabbit at Idora Park

In 1902 Idora Park built its first roller coaster, a figure-eight toboggan slide, the first of three coasters constructed in approximately the same location on the western edge of the park. This coaster would be replaced by the Firefly in the 1920s and then by the famous Wildcat. In 1914 a second coaster, the Dip-the-Dips, built by the T. M. Harton Company of Pittsburgh, opened in the park’s southeast corner. It would be remodeled in the mid-1920s and renamed the Jack Rabbit.

Follow me on Twitter

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Music of all types played a significant role in Idora Park’s history, and the park’s success was due in part to its policy of booking top attractions. John Philip Sousa played at Idora in 1918, and by the end of the Big Band era of the 1930s to the 1950s, virtually every significant dance orchestra in America had played at Idora Park including Cab Calloway, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, and Guy Lombardo.

In the 1950s and 1960s tastes shifted from Big Band to rock and roll. Dan Ryan of WBBW radio introduced record hops to Idora in 1953. Live music was not abandoned, however, and the park continued to book national acts such as the Eagles, Monkees, Bobby Rydell, Bobby Sherman, and many others. Polka bands also drew huge crowds to Idora.

Youngstownbaseball at Idora Park

Sports were popular attractions at Idora, especially in the 1920s when Major League teams would play exhibition games there. The Cleveland Indians and Pittsburgh Pirates played at Idora as did the Boston Red Sox, Brooklyn Dodgers, and many more. By 1920 Idora Park had the only fenced-in ball field in Youngstown, and the city’s premier semi-pro team, the McElroys, used Idora as their home field. In July 1920 the legendary John McGraw brought his New York Giants to Idora. Though the New York lineup included five future members of baseball’s Hall of Fame, the McElroys won 8-2 marking the first time a local team had ever defeated a major league club.

By the 1960s most visitors to Idora Park were teenagers, not families, and several changes reflected this new demographic. In 1967 Idora charged admission for the first time, inaugurating a Pay-One-Price policy that included unlimited rides for $2.50. The Rapids was re-themed as a jungle ride and renamed The Lost River, and the fun house became the Whacky Shack to reflect the psychedelic 1960s.

On April 26, 1984, a catastrophic fire destroyed Idora’s Lost River ride, part of the Wildcat, the park office, and most of the game booths on the lower midway. Despite the losses, the park opened on schedule for the 1984 season. But the loss of major attractions proved to be a fatal blow, and the owners announced that the 1984 season would be the last.”

Although the Park is long gone, the neighborhood still exists and the YNDC will be out there with volunteers cleaning up the Glenwood Ave this Saturday March 18. And of course they could use some help. Why not go ahead on click the link and let em know you can come out to help. And you can reminisce too about simpler times while you are there. Help us clean up Glenwood Avenue! We will be removing overgrowth and debris from vacant lots, cleaning up trash, shoveling sidewalks, and more! Meet at YNDC Office, 820 Canfield Road. Parking available around the corner at 822 Billingsgate Avenue.

Follow Me on Soundcloud

Meals on Wheels PSA with Mario Andretti. Head on over to their page and give em a like, then get in touch by calling 330-744-3583 and do lunch with some of our treasured seniors here in the Mahoning Valley.

The Fowler Market Spring Fling with Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Fowler Market will be holding it’s Spring Fling on Saturday and Sunday. We will be hosting a two day “Spring Fling” vendor event with TONS of local handmade crafters, homemade edibles like chocolates, breads, jams & jellies, and much more!

Break that cabin fever and come join us with all of your favorite local vendors! There will also be a Chinese Auction, 50/50 drawing, and of course our weekly Queen of Hearts drawing – plenty of chances to win some unique goodies and a little extra spending money!

Tickets for the drawings will be sold on both Saturday and Sunday, but drawings will not take place until Sunday. Winners need not be present to win!

Donna from Wooden Barn Shop will be hosting a Sip & Build from 12:00-2:00 on BOTH days. Cost will be $40 with all materials provided and Builders may bring their own beverages to “Sip” (let’s stay within reason though, please! Remember, it’ll only be noon. Please RSVP to Donna at 330-442-1722 or message Wooden Barn Shop on Facebook.

Free Shoutouts with Mahoning Valley Podcast

This is the Mahoning Valley Podcast and it occurred to me that there a plenty of people here who may want to do a segment. Who may want to have their voice heard on a Podcast. Maybe you have an event or cause or just want to say hi to the Valley. This podcast was never meant to be all about me. It has been a work in progress. Well, it is your turn. If you want to record a segment and email it to me, I will consider adding it to an episode.

Because this is a community project, you must be a part of the Mahoning Valley or have some connection to the Valley. If you want to talk about your grandma or how you grew up in Struthers or what you favorite restaurant is, or favorite gym, or favorite bar, or favorite band or anything. It just needs to be about something or someone in the Mahoning Valley.

You may be thinking, how much is this going to cost me. Nothing. Nada. Just record on your phone. Record with your friends. Record on your laptop or tablet. Save the file as an MP3 and send it over. Send it over with any links or pictures you want to include. This is all about everyone here in the Valley. So give it a try. It is easy and free and will get your voice added to the Mahoning Valley Podcast Archive. Send as many as you want. Any topic. BUT, no bad language. I look forward to helping you be a part of the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

Like my page on Facebook.