Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 34

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Do you love the Mahoning Valley? Well you are not alone. In fact, a group of entrepreneurs and community leaders who love the Valley are launching a Mobile App at a Free Launch Party that will focus on community involvement and will provide a fun interactive tool to connect individuals with organizations in service to our community.

Downtown Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley PodcastThe party will include an uplifting atmosphere with light food, beverages and prizes for volunteers. Short presentations by area leaders will take place every 30 minutes. Speakers including the Mayor of Youngstown (John McNally) and Jim Cossler (of the YBI) will encourage community involvement and touch on topics like Education, Area Improvements, Economic Development, Unity, and the importance of our faith communities.

Click here to lean more about who we are and about our Mobile App.

This event will be open to the public (no admission required). We are also extending special invitations to many Area Leaders, Non-Profit Organizations and local news channels.

March 30th, 2017, 5pm – 7pm (RSVP below)

Tyler History Center, 325 W Federal St, Youngstown, OH

How You Can Help: Attend the event and spread the word to others by sharing our website and on Facebook. Click here to like their page on Facebook. And RSVP by March 26th and Register as a Love This Place Volunteer for a chance to win one of three $100 Amazon Gift Cards. Must be present at the Launch Party on March 30th to win.

This is the Mahoning Valley Podcast and it occurred to me that there a plenty of people here who may want to do a segment. Who may want to have their voice heard on a Podcast. Maybe you have an event or cause or just want to say hi to the Valley. This podcast was never meant to be all about me. It has been a work in progress. Well, it is your turn. If you want to record a segment and email it to me, I will consider adding it to an episode.

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Because this is a community project, you must be a part of the Mahoning Valley or have some connection to the Valley. If you want to talk about your grandma or how you grew up in Struthers or what you favorite restaurant is, or favorite gym, or favorite bar, or favorite band or anything. It just needs to be about something or someone in the Mahoning Valley.

You may be thinking, how much is this going to cost me. Nothing. Nada. Just record on your phone. Record with your friends. Record on your laptop or tablet. Save the file as an MP3 and send it over. Send it over with any links or pictures you want to include. This is all about everyone here in the Valley. So give it a try. It is easy and free and will get your voice added to the Mahoning Valley Podcast Archive. Send as many as you want. Any topic. BUT, no bad language. I look forward to helping you be a part of the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

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Wickyards and the Mahoning Valley Podcast

The Service Monkeys at the Wickyards on March 23. Everyone knows how much I love Free Events. On Thursday at 7PM in downtown Youngstown at 711 Wick Ave, Nick Chicone’s (of The Service Monkeys) 21st Birthday Bash.

Featuring this lineup of local indie bands. I suspect this will be a fine display of our youth’s artistic musical aspirations.

The Service Monkeys – Energetic, indie punk from Boardman, OH http://theservicemonkeys.bandcamp.com

Morning In May– Catchy upbeat emo-influenced pop-punk from Akron, Ohio https://youtu.be/f5uuEXfCkv8

Three Vultures – Socially conscious, alternative from Lisbon, OH https://threevultures.bandcamp.com

Toolebox & The Crew – Folk punk from Bowerston, OH https://toolebox.bandcamp.com/releases

Special acoustic sets will be played outside in between sets by Askew_Painting, Dustin Cutwright, and Alex Richards http://alexrichardsmusic.bandcamp.com

This is a FREE show. Come celebrate Nick Chicone’s 21st birthday at 711 Wick Ave. Youngstown, OH

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When you get old and get hungry and may be alone in this world, you are going to want someone to care. Well, you can show you care right now. Join Mario Andretti and do lunch with Meals on Wheels Mahoning Valley.

On March 24th, Tri Changes Salon in Girard celebrates its 25th Anniversary in business. And the celebration warrants a shoutout. 25 years in business with an all nighter by staying open for 25 hours straight starting March 24th! Our theme is mental health and suicide awareness.

They will meet at St. Rose Church parking lot at 4 o’clock Thursday. There will be guest speakers to uplift us. After they speak there will be a one mile balloon walk to honor those who have passed away. A counselor will be on hand to provide information on addiction, mental health issues, & bullying. We will have a balloon release and Bear Hugs following the walk.

Tri Changes Salon and the Mahoning Valley Podcast

Food will be provided at the Salon by Ianazone’s pizza in Niles. Temporary tattoos available for donation by Thad Minnick. Western Southern will be doing kid’s identikits. There will be a 50/50 raffle, Chinese auction & Paul Mitchell giveaway at the Salon. Money raised will be used to provide a Paul Mitchell the school Scholarship & also will be donated to the Emmanuel Center.

Be the 25th or 92nd client and receive a complimentary future service. Wear your PJ’s between the hours of 10pm and 10am to receive a candy bar with Tri Sweet savings. You could be a golden ticket winner. We will be accepting canned foods, treats, toys, and monetary donations for pets! Trumbull County Mental health/addiction help and information will be available at the Emmanuel Center from 8am to 4:30 pm on Friday.

Take a little nap and then head on over to the Box Gallery for a Multi and Mixed Media Art Show featuring Michael Long who is a Pennsylvania based artist that works in multi-media sculpture, painting and assemblage. His work has been on display at the Westmorland Museum of American Art along with various galleries, museums and private and permanent collections.

Life Sized Sculpture with the Box Gallery

He is a member of Associated artists of Pittsburgh and currently known for his large scale permanent installation project at the Station Medical Center Altoona, Pa. Michael is always looking to create new processes and use non traditional materials to put a twist on non traditional art. This will be Michael’s opening at the Box Gallery. This will be a free event to the public, with appetizers, drinks and music.

According to the Vindicator, Youngstown CityScape is celebrating its 20 th Anniversary this year. When Youngstown CityScape started Streetscape, a beautification program, it had about two dozen volunteers cleaning up a small part of downtown.

Streetscape will celebrate its 20th anniversary on June 3 with about 700 volunteers expected to clean up debris and plant flowers and shrubs in major sections of downtown and the surrounding areas.

“There’s been a transformation,” said Scott Schulick, Streetscape chairman and one of the original volunteers. “There wasn’t much pride in downtown 20 years ago. Trees and the landscape were overgrown and no one took care of downtown. Now we have a large group that has helped transform the look of downtown.”

“It’s grown exponentially,” added Sharon Letson, CityScape executive director. “When we started 20 years ago, there were two restaurants and a few businesses downtown. Our program and downtown have grown so much in 20 years.”

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Youngstown CityScape kicked off its fundraising drive Monday for its 20th annual Streetscape planting day at the YMCA of Youngstown’s Manchester Room with a breakfast.

The planting day is scheduled for 8 a.m. to noon June 3. This year’s theme is “20 Years: People + Vision + Action.” Volunteers will beautify downtown and surrounding areas by removing debris, trimming, planting flowers and shrubs, and mulching planted areas.

Project partners include the city, YSU, Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership Program, YSUScape, Community Corrections Association, Youngstown Metropolitan Housing Authority, Men’s Garden Club of Youngstown, St. Elizabeth Youngstown Hospital, Fifth Avenue Boulevard Neighbors, Crandall Park South Neighbors, 7th Ward Citizens Coalition, Garden District Neighborhood Association, Rocky Ridge Neighbors, Mahoning Commons Association and the Wick Park Neighborhood Association.

Because of the 20th anniversary, Letson said Streetscape is asking people to add $20 or 20 percent to their annual donation to the effort. CityScape usually raises about $50,000 annually for the Streetscape program, Letson said. To volunteer or donate, contact CityScape by phone at 330-742-4040, email at cityscapedirector@sbcglobal.net or go to its website: https://youngstowncityscape.org.

A Niles man has invented a green power machine and is looking forward to deploying a number of his Free Power Generators here in the Mahoning Valley. According to the Tribune Chronicle, Bob Jadloski describes himself as a professional photographer and tech guy, not an inventor.

Bob Jadloski and the FPG

Even so, Jadloski, whose Trumbull County Courthouse photograph adorns a wall inside the Washington, D.C., office of U.S. Rep. Timothy J. Ryan, D-Howland, has created a machine he says could “revolutionize the energy industry.”

Jadloski started developing the concept more than five years ago. In 2014, he moved what he calls the Free Pressure Generator from his home in Niles to the Oak Hill Collaborative’s Tech Hub in Youngstown.

“I have photography experience and I’m an IT (information technology), computer-tech person. I’m not an oil-and-gas guy. I’m not an inventor by trade and I wouldn’t call myself one,” the Warren native said. “I worked in advanced engineering at Delphi, but had nothing to do with gas or oil.”

Jadloski has been sharing his project with area groups, clubs and organizations as part of an ongoing effort to “get the word out,” garner support and potentially attract investors.

Recently, he unveiled the generator at a Warren Rotary meeting. He has also been invited to explain its workings at a future business pitch event of the Sundown Rundown group that helps entrepreneurs connect with the investors, mentors and talent they need “to help take their idea to the next step,” the group’s website states.

Jadloski said what he has now is a large, unfinished prototype or “beta unit that is nowhere near what it will look like” when he’s done.

He said although there have been engineers who have worked with him on the project at the Tech Hub, he needs a team to help him fine-tune specifications for his generator before he moves forward to sell it. His goal, he said, is to create a final product that is “friendly to the environment, an efficient, inexpensive way to produce green energy” and in the process promote economic development and create jobs.

“That’s what we should all want. Anyone who lives here in the Valley, we should all be working toward economic development,” Jadloski said. “The goal should always be to encourage people to stay here, not leave because we don’t have enough to offer them, we don’t have to jobs to keep them here. If we could have teams building FPGs, imagine what we could do.”

How it works

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Basically, an FPG is anything that can spin a turbine and make electricity. The FPG is similar to a hydroelectric generator, which relies on flowing water on a dam, or hydropower, to produce electricity. But, Jadloski said, his FPG could easily rely on area natural-gas wells with the generator converting unused energy into electricity. The generator would be attached to a pressurized pipeline and the pressure from the gas lines would be used to run it.

“Since we have millions of miles of pipes running in the ground that have gas, water and sewage running in them, most are gravity flow, we could be harvesting the free energy from the flow of any of all of these sources,” Jadloski said. “The gas one is just the beginning. I envision in the future everyone would be able to have some form of a FPG connected to their house or business.

“This not the next windmill or solar panel. It’s utilizing what we already have right here in the Mahoning Valley and making the most of it.”

One generator has enough power to run 25 homes as long as there’s enough “flow and pressure” to run it, he said. “It’s clean and self-sufficient,” Jadloski said.

Pat Kerrigan, Tech Hub director, said the FPG could be a game-changer.

“This particular project is something I think has great potential,” he said. “The invention itself is a simple concept. It’s a great idea and a workable concept.”

Dave Hanson of Newton Falls, who is familiar with the FPG, said Jadloski “has a great idea. It’s just going to take the right person” to help him launch it.

“The thing is there are so many pressurized gas lines, a lot of these natural resources, in under-developed countries,” Hanson said. “Bob has come up with an idea that’s green. This could be an opportunity to provide electric to schools, clinics … it’s just such a simple idea that could really benefit a lot of lives.”

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Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 31

You can Download this Audio File from the Internet Archive for listening anytime you want.

The St Patty’s Day Parade will be at 1PM on Market Street in Boardman. And it is a free candyfest for you and your family. Bring your own bags and you can stock up for a whole year. Seriously. I have been in the past and even when we left the candy on the ground and only took what was handed to us, we ended up with somewhere between 2-4 lbs of tootsie rolls, lollipops, and assorted sweets. All in their wrappers passed out during the usual 2 hour or so parade of just about every fire department, police department, and many local companies.

St Patricks Day Parade Anouncers with Mahoning Valley Podcast

It is a beautiful and noisy affair. Sirens going off, horns blowing, and plenty of pageantry. Seriously fun as long as you are dressed for the weather and bring your own chair. And get there early if you want a seat right next to the street. Even last year when there was a rather steady rain and it was about 40 degrees outside. That was why we left the candy on the street if it was thrown at us. Because the street was wet and there was plenty of candy being handed to us. So how long has the Mahoning Valley been hosting a St Patty’s Day Parade you may ask? And what is the history of the Irish in the Mahoning Valley? I found you a few sources if you want to find out.

According to their website, This year the Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade celebrates its 39th Anniversary! Our theme this year is “May The Irish Be With You”. The Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade is one of the largest parades in the state of Ohio. Each year 25,000 to 30,000 spectators come out to celebrate this beloved family tradition. Among the Sponsors of the parade are WFMJ TV-21, The CW WBCB and The Vindicator.

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History of the Irish in Mahoning Valley and Youngstown with the Mahoning Valley Podcast

According to the Book, “Irish in Youngstown and the Greater Mahoning Valley” The first Irish Settler arrived in this Region with John Young; the namesake for Youngstown in 1796 and purchased 1000 Acres and settled down. Plenty of Pictures if you are into that sort of thing, just by clicking on the link.

For much more on the History of the Irish in the Mahoning Valley, Please visit Steel Valley Voices. An incredible compendium of historical accounts of the Hogan Family and other early Irish Immigrants to the Mahoning Valley. Fascinating reads and more pictures if you like history all compiled by our favorite local educational resource. YSU.

Starting to feel a little green and wanting to explore even more Irish Culture and Events? Well the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning Valley is planning a neart of activities. Hey, wow, I spoke Ulster flavored Gaelic. Did you hear that? Anyway, Check out all the Events our fabulous library is planning to Celebrate the Green.

Mahoning and Youngstown Public Library Leprechaun with Mahoning Valley Podcast

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Library Leprechaun Lollapalooza Oh yeah, try saying that 3 times fast. Well, you can try it. I won’t.

Join in the Saint Patrick’s Day festivities at the Poland and Canfield libraries on Saturday, March 11. Irish food for sale all day at Kravitz Deli in Poland Library and Kravitz Express in Canfield Library. Corned beef & cabbage dinners, stout stew, corned beef sandwiches, Bailey’s cheesecake.

9:30 a.m. (Poland Library) – Leprechaun Magic Show

9:30 a.m. (Canfield Library) – Burke Irish Dancers

10:15 a.m. (Poland and Canfield) – Parade of leprechauns! Dress as a leprechaun or in your most festive Saint Patrick’s Day gear and join a parade through the library! Each child who enters the parade will receive an entry for a chance to win a book of Irish fairy tales. For children in grade six and under.

10:45 a.m. (Poland and Canfield Libraries) – St. Patrick’s Day story time for children of all ages.

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. – (Poland Library) – Lucky Coin Book Sale in the Friends of PLYMC Bookstore inside Poland Library. Select a coin and get a percentage off your total bill. Cookies will be provided for the kids. Check out the new Friends of PLYMC bag coffee that will be sold at the bookstore located in Poland Library. Proceeds benefit the Library’s children’s programming.

11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. (Poland and Canfield Libraries) – Scavenger hunt for grades six and under and a great time to visit the café for an Irish lunch.

12:30 p.m. (Poland Library) – Burke Irish Dancers

12:30 p.m. (Canfield Library) – Leprechaun Magic Show

Then on March 14th, ‘Tis the Luck of the Irish” Local professional musicians play Irish chamber music to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. No reservations are needed for this special program. For any age at the Poland Library, at 7 p.m.

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YSURF and the Mahoning Valley Podcast

YSURF is leading the way in creating private/public partnerships to improve the well being of our Community. A most recent example is the acquisition of a 200K Grant from Lift will create the first ever “teaching factory”. “Teaching Businesses” of all kinds are able to bring new ideas and technology to organizations that may be struggling to keep up with modern technologies while finding the staffers necessary to operate them. It is a brilliant way of developing economic opportunity in areas like our Valley where we need to continue to embrace technology to compete on a global scale.

According to Lift, As manufacturing becomes increasingly advanced, the industry will need workers with more technical skills to work on and operate the high tech equipment the manufacturing industry is using today and that will be developed in the future. For Ohio manufacturers to meet this growing need, LIFT –Lightweight Innovations For Tomorrow has joined a partnership among Mahoning Valley manufacturers, educators at all levels, and workforce developers, led by Youngstown State University Research Foundation (YSURF), to develop the Mahoning Valley Innovation & Commercialization Center (MVICC).

This public- private partnership will create an educational and entrepreneurial hub to share facilities, equipment, and instructors – all necessary to build the educated and skilled manufacturing workforce for the region.

The MVICC will serve as the first of its kind for the manufacturing industry, creating a “Teaching Factory” by replicating the concept of teaching hospitals across the U.S. The Teaching Factory will use shared equipment, facilities and training, all focused on the greater purpose of creating and shaping the talent of tomorrow and further developing incumbent workers today.

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Meals on Wheels Public Service Announcement with Mario Andretti.

The deadline to purchase tickets for the 16th annual Community Star awards dinner is Monday.

Co-sponsored by the Tribune Chronicle and Trumbull 100, the Community Star program celebrates local volunteers who go above and beyond to make a measurable impact in the lives of others. Ten people were selected from 47 nominations received this year.

“There were quite a few great nominations this year, and it was difficult to narrow to 10. This year’s winners have a huge impact in so many areas of our community. They are so inspirational,” said Sue Shafer, community events coordinator for the Tribune Chronicle.

The 2017 Class of Community Stars are:

D’Andre Bowers of Warren is the chief officer of Warren Neighborhood Initiative, which was created in 2016 with the goal of helping develop and revitalize neighborhoods in Warren;

• William E. Casey of Hubbard helped create the Adopt-A-Home program in Warren and donated $25,000 to help get the project that revitalizes the central city neighborhood in Warren off the ground;

• Amanda Colbert of Warren is a board member of Team Sanders Inc., a nonprofit group that provides after-school programs and focuses on community involvement, and she started Colbert’s Care, a group of people dedicated to community service;

• Shirley Frazier of Southington is director of the food pantry at Grace United Methodist Church on Drexel Avenue NW in Warren, a job she has given her time toward for 10 years. Frazier, a retired nurse, also volunteers at St. Joe’s at the Mall, a full-service health and wellness center of St. Joseph Warren Hospital;

• William H. Gore of Cortland is a U.S. Army veteran who as a member of the American Legion Post 540 in Cortland served as post chairman for the American Legion Buckeye Boys State. Gore also serves as chaplain for the Vietnam veterans chapter in Warren and is an active member of the Trumbull County Honor Guard;

• Elliott Heckman of Warren repairs bicycles and gives them to the Salvation Army to distribute to kids at Christmas;

• Lou Lepro of Warren is vice president of the Trumbull Deanery of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. In that capacity, Lepro, in part, manages the kitchen and dining hall and oversees and helps the volunteers. In addition, he helped form the Historical Perkins Homestead Neighborhood Association;

• James McFarland of Warren served and serves on several local boards, including the Warren-Trumbull County Public Library board, which he has been a member of for 20 years. McFarland also is on the Base Community Council at the Youngstown Air Reserve Station;

Dr. Farid Naffah of Cortland created the Avamar Foundation, which helps the elderly needy population pay for medication. Each year since 2010, he has hosted a fundraiser to raise money for the foundation; and

James Shuttic of Warren is president of the board of directors of the Fine Arts Council of Trumbull County, a role that lets him develop events to give artists a chance to show their work. An artist, Shuttic has created and helped install a variety of public art projects in the Garden District of Warren. Make sure to stop by the Fine Arts Council page on Facebook to give em a like.

“On behalf of Trumbull 100, we would like to congratulate all of the recipients of the Community Star award this year,” said Jordan Taylor, president of Trumbull 100. “Trumbull 100, in co-sponsorship with the Tribune Chronicle, are proud to be able to highlight the best in community service Trumbull County has to offer.”

Full profiles of each person will be featured in a special section that will be published March 22 in the Tribune Chronicle.

Tickets for the banquet at St. Demetrios Community Center in Warren are available at the newspaper office, 240 Franklin St. SE, by phone or by an order form that will run frequently in the pages of the Tribune Chronicle. For more information, contact Shafer at sshafer@tribtoday.com or at 330-841-1696.

The event is open to the community and the Mahoning Valley Podcast salutes all the winners this year for demonstrating and modeling the best in human nature here in our Valley.

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Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 26

What is a Podcast, Pseudocast and Noncast? A Local and Regional Podcast Sampler today on the Mahoning Valley Podcast.

To support this Podcast go here and become a sponsor through Paypal or buy something from Amazon, or sign up to get more Twitter Followers, or get more great Audio Products from Learnoutloud.com or Consider hiring me for Freelance or Contract Work. Plenty of ways to support this Community Project for the Mahoning Valley of NE Ohio.

Do you want to subscribe to this podcast? Then visit Podomatic here.

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I am such a fan of podcasting. It gives nearly anyone the opportunity to produce audio that can be listened to anywhere you have a smartphone, tablet, or computer. It seems to me that some other people around here are starting to see the potential, so I decided to show them some love with some samples of their work.

We also have some people who are reaching for podcasting, but have not quite gone all the way. Those people are pseudocasting or noncasting. Either they are calling something a podcast and it is not. Or they are simply recording some stuff and not technically “casting” it anywhere.

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We have had a number of podcasting efforts here too. But for whatever reason the producers stopped producing episodes, but you can still go to these websites and download past episodes some of which are pretty good. I will give you a sample of some of these as well today.

But I figured since this is a community effort and the Mahoning Valley Podcast is a community project, it would not hurt to at least give people a chance to up their game. So if you are pseudocasting or noncasting, listen up and we will get you up to speed today.

I am going to start with the people and organizations that are actually publishing content that you can listen to on demand currently and work down to the folks that are still trying to get here. I highly recommend that you give them a listen. I did not put these in any specific order so if something interests you, click on the link and subscribe and show them some love.

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We have a decent music podcast hosted by a fellow who goes by the name of Jimmy Fro. He enjoys discussing music with local musicians. Recently he did an episode with a couple of local musicians who call themselves the SuperBabes. Let’s give a listen. Naturally you can click on the link above to subscribe or find out more information about the Jimmy Fro Show. You can also click the link and go like the SuperBabes.

We also have another Music Show produced by YoLive Radio that concerns itself with hip Hop and Rap Music and bill themselves as purveyors of the underground scene for this genre. They have a pro account over on Spreaker. Click the link above to hear some more from them. But let’s give em a listen.

Now if you are interested in Guns and Shooting there is a podcast based up in Garrettsville called the “Eye on the Target”. It looks as if they are also running some live broadcasts as well. I have never heard of podcast garden where their podcast is hosted, but it requires a little tech knowledge to actually listen to their stuff On Demand. If you want some pointers on how to download their episodes, just let me know. And let’s see what they have to say for themselves.

We actually have two marketing podcasts here in the Mahoning Valley. I have a preference as to what it a better effort and the primary reason that I feel this way is that one is obviously self promotional and one is actually educational without the obvious self promotion. We will listen to a little of both and you can decide who you like better.

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First Ross Morrone’s This is Marketing

Then George Farris’s podcasts.

Podcasts that call themselves podcasts but cannot be downloaded easily or not at all without a special app are really pseudocasting. They say they are podcasting but in reality they are only recording files for people to listen to when they are found on the internet. Many people are not familiar with the idea of downloading a file from a web page. And they are not sure what to do with it once they do. That is why all my episodes provide multiple options for download in a number of formats. Because not everyone has a ipod. Or a Macintosh Operating system. Nor do they want to install Itunes. So that means that if you are only offering your psuedocast on Itunes or Stitcher, you are leaving people out of the wonderful experience of listening to your show when they want to, where they want to, and how they want to. It is a pseudo experience and presentation. Here are few pseudocasts.

Meals on Wheels Mahoning Valley PSA If you have free time then put it to good use, please.

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The City of You falls into the pseudocast category. Mainly because it cannot be downloaded. These guys are working off a grant so I am guessing that they are content with recording an interview and posting it on soundcloud. And that is great. But there are no notes or links on the show. And the episodes cannot be downloaded. That makes it a pseudocast.

The Nursery. A comedy and story telling “podcast” on Stitcher. Stitcher seems like a good idea and is moderately popular in the podcasting world; however you have to download the app to actually listen to anything there.

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So although it is technically on demand, it is also proprietary. Meaning if that is the only place you make your “podcast” available, many people will never hear it. As such, I was unable to download an episode to give you a sample. It is mildly entertaining to me, I would rate it a 7. You may like it more if you want to give it a listen and let me know what you think. I am always interested in people’s opinions.

Vindy Radio Someone obviously buffaloed the management of the Vindicator into thinking that they are doing podcasts. Again, these are pseudocasts. There is not a distribution mechanism and very sparse show notes. But it is the lack of distribution that makes these a pseudocast. And that is kind of sad because one of my favorite local Radio Personalities hosts these shows.

We do have another pseudocast that is sponsored by WYSU and a Business Development Officer for Humilty of May Health Partners that is still being produced called “Doing Good”.

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It seems to be focused on spotlighting people who have and are doing good things here in the region. Although it has been around for a couple of years now, it is still not really a podcast in the sense that if you want to listen to it on demand, you have to know how to download it. Again, if you need some help with downloading the episodes, just let me know. It is not that hard, but does require a little tech knowledge. But let’s listen to the last episode as these are all only a few minutes long.

Defunct Podcasts you can still listen too by clicking the links below would be considered noncasts. As they quit. They are not producing current content. And they may also fall into both categories of pseudocasting and noncasting. Because they do not produce content that is distributed properly and they quit producing current content.

Mercy Health Podcasts. Actually not out of the Mahoning Valley, but the organization does have a presence here so I included a brief sample. They also are still reaching for it, because they have not syndicated their episodes. Unless you know how to download a file from a web page, no podcast for you. But give a listen. Good production values anyway.

WYSU was for a short time making some of their shows available in the form of on demand audio as well in fact they actually had four different shows going at the same time, but it looks like they quit producing episodes in 2015. You can still go there and listen in. Just follow the links.

Looking Out is a forum for community leaders to come together and discuss national and global issues from often unexplored angles. This round-table discussion covers many topics ranging from the economy to foreign policy, and ecology to education. Here is a sample.

Life on Life’s Terms, was developed to address issues of chemical dependency in the minority community. The show addresses concerns that are unique to the minority population by inviting special guests to share their addiction recovery stories with the listening audience. Guests provide real-life testimony and disseminate information about educational opportunities to our recovering listeners, women, African Americans, Latinos, youth, and parents who are affected by the societal concerns of alcohol and drug abuse. Education and information at the grass roots level is the goal.

Crisis assistance is available through Help Hotline 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Just Dial 211. The telephone numbers given by this pseudocast are:

In Youngstown: (330) 747-2696 Warren: (330) 393-1565 Toll free: 1-888-317-2169

If you need additional information or want to share your views and opinions about the program or addition recovery, please feel free to write: Here is a little sample of the last episode in November of 2016. And you can click on the link above to send snail mail.

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There are more of them on the WYSU Website here. Well produced but again, not distributed or presented properly. Click on the Programs Tab on the Main Menu you will find a plethora of files you can listen to and download.

Episode 17 of the Mahoning Valley Podcast

Please listen or download this episode here. You can also subscribe from this link.

Show Summary: Ohio Posts Record Year for New Business Formation. Harlem Globetrotters Tall Enough to Install Smoke Detectors. Austintown School Counselor Recognized by The First Lady. Idora Neighborhood Workday. McDonough Museum of Arts Receptions. Pet Look-a-Like Contest Starts Friday.

According to the Business Journal, Business formation in Ohio saw a seventh consecutive record-breaking year in 2016, Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted reported. Last year, 105,009 new filings were made with the secretary of state’s office, up from the 97,746 new businesses that filed in 2015, setting the previous record.

“We are offering better services to entrepreneurs at a lower cost and as a result, more are choosing Ohio for their new business than ever before,” Husted said in a news release announcing the 2016 results.

Making it simpler and less costly to do business in Ohio has been a top priority for Husted since taking office in 2011, according to the release. Initiatives toward that goal include the launch of Ohio Business Central, which enables Ohio-based businesses to form and renew their business status online; establishing a partnership with Google’s “Let’s Get Our Cities on the Map” program to put additional tools in the hands of new and growing Ohio businesses; and partnering with the Cleveland Sight Center to reduce wait time for callers into the Business Services Call Center.

The initiatives have enabled Husted to reduce spending in his office by $14.5 million in his first term when compared to the previous administration, he reported. In his second term, he requested a cut, not an increase, in his budget, and last December he requested a 100% cut in General Revenue Funds for the next biennium while announcing his plan to run the office for the remainder of his term without the use of taxpayer funds.

This is the sort of thing that deserves recognition. Growing opportunity without growing cost. I figure that anytime anyone can figure out a way to increase opportunities for the Mahoning Valley without asking for more money to do it, they deserve some props. So well done, Mr Husted. And Thanks.

According to WKBN, A Harlem Globetrotter helped the American Red Cross install free smoke detectors in Youngstown homes on Wednesday. To prevent fire tragedies, the Red Cross is working to set up free smoke detectors in homes across northeast Ohio.

On Monday, volunteers installed 61 smoke detectors as part of the Red Cross’ Home Fire Campaign. Volunteers were back at the life-saving project again on Wednesday. Most of the time, a volunteer needs a ladder to install a smoke detector, but not Zeus McClurkin. The Harlem Globetrotter is 6’8″.

He said the Globetrotters partnered with the Red Cross for this project. “We’re doing an amazing initiative trying to help install some smoke detectors to underprivileged areas in the city. One thing that we’re going to be doing is replacing old smoke detectors and giving people free, new smoke detectors.”

He installed smoke detectors in two homes Wednesday afternoon. At one of the stops, he and the Red Cross installed three brand new smoke detectors for a man on the east side of Youngstown.

McClurkin said he’s happy to be part of such a great program.

“There are actually three home fires in northeast Ohio every night and we’re hoping to make that number go down every day,” he said. “Hopefully, we can do that with these free smoke detectors that we’re installing.”

But it wasn’t all work for McClurkin. He showed off some of his Globetrotter moves and even had a homeowner join in. The smoke detector program is ongoing. For more information on how to get a smoke alarm or volunteer with the program, visit the Red Cross’ website. Volunteers work about three to four hours a week to install them.

FEMA PSA

According to the Vindicator, Austintown Elementary School counselor Kelley Mills was among the school counselors from across the country who stood onstage with the First Lady during her final speech in that position.

Mills was in Washington, D.C., to be recognized as the 2017 Counselor of the Year State Representative for Ohio after being selected as Ohio’s Elementary School Counselor of the Year and overall School Counselor of the Year.

Education has been a centerpiece of the first lady’s agenda during her eight years in the White House. In her final speech, she talked about her “Reach Higher” initiative, which launched in 2014.

“Now, when we first came up with this idea, we had one clear goal in mind: We wanted to make higher education cool. We wanted to change the conversation around what it means and what it takes to be a success in this country,” Obama said. “Because let’s be honest, if we’re always shining the spotlight on professional athletes or recording artists or Hollywood celebrities, if those are the only achievements we celebrate, then why would we ever think kids would see college as a priority? So we decided to flip the script and shine a big, bright spotlight on all things educational.”

Obama credited school counselors such as Mills with helping to make her initiative a success.

“And we know that school counselors like all of the folks standing with me on this stage have played a critical role in helping us get there,” she said. “So our school counselors are truly among the heroes of the ‘Reach Higher’ story. And that’s why we created this event two years ago, because we thought that they should finally get some recognition. We wanted everyone to know about the difference that these phenomenal men and women have been making in the lives of our young people every day.”

Obama went on to tell the assembled counselors, “You see the promise in each of your students. You believe in them even when they can’t believe in themselves, and you work tirelessly to help them be who they were truly meant to be. … These men and women show them that those kids matter; that they have something to offer; that no matter where they’re from or how much money their parents have, no matter what they look like or who they love or how they worship or what language they speak at home, they have a place in this country.

“And as I end my time in the White House, I can think of no better message to send our young people in my last official remarks as first lady,” she said.

The experience was inspiring and rejuvenating, Mills said. “I thought it was really powerful, and I was really excited because the little ones at Austintown Elementary live-streamed her message, so they were able to see me as well as hear her message,” she said. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime thing for me – for anyone, really.” Well done Ms Mills and congratulations.

Saturday January 21, 2017 Join the YNDC for a day of cleaning up and working in the Idora Neghborhood of Youngstown. Meet at YNDC Office, 820 Canfield Road. Parking available around the corner at 822 Billingsgate Avenue.

McDonough Museum of Art Events,

Selections from the collection of the Richard M. Ross Art Museum, Ohio Wesleyan University

January 20-March 3, 2017 Public Reception, Friday, January 20, 6-8pm

The permanent collection at the Ross Art Museum consists of more than 2,500 works of art including American and European prints, drawings, photographs, paintings and sculpture. Artists featured in the exhibition include Elliot Erwitt, Joel Meyerowitz, Alen MacWeeney and Frank Stella. We are grateful to the exhibition sponsors Dr. Albert and Suzanne Cinelli for introducing us to the Ross and its outstanding staff.

Alex Webb: La Calle, Photographs from Mexico

January 20-March 3, 2017

Public Reception, Friday, January 20, 6-8pm

An elusive presence identified as “no one” wanders, strays, gets lost, and finds itself again in the poem “La Calle” (The Street) by Octavio Paz, which is set in a silent, desolate territory bordering the world of sleep, where dreamlike street corners always lead to the same place. It is from this extraordinary literary work that photographer Alex Webb (born in San Francisco, 1952) took the title for his compendium of street photographs of Mexico, which he’s taken over three decades. However, the street that appears in Webb’s images, in contrast to Paz’s, is an often crowded, vibrant, ever-changing place, where “no one” becomes a metaphor for the precarious, the chaotic, the multitudinous.

First in black and white (1975–78) and then in color (1978–2007), Webb has documented the multicultural, syncretic, lively, overcharged, and at times turbulent reality of a nation that during this period has known all sorts of political and economic crises, but has also offered ample evidence of its capabilities for resistance and survival, despite the relentless pressure of threats and tragedies, most recently the ferocious violence caused by the growth of organized crime and the government’s erratic fight against it.

The Business Journal will be sponsoring it’s annual Pet Look A Like Contest starting January 20. Valentine’s Day is a celebration of love between people, but there are plenty of kinds of love in the world. That’s why The Business Journal is celebrating furry, four-legged friends in our newest contest.

The Pet Look-Alike photo contest wants to see who loves their pet so much that they actually look like each other!

Beginning Friday, The Business Journal will hold a photo contest on their Facebook page to see who loves their pet the most. The contest closes Feb. 19, with the winner announced on National Love Your Pet Day, Feb. 20.

Entries are limited to one picture per email address. Voting is limited to one vote per Facebook user per day. The Business Journal reserves the right to remove submitted pictures that are inappropriate.

WWF PSA

Social Media Management and Assessment Services at Mahoning Valley Podcast

Social Media Management and Assessment

Most people will tell you that you have to be on Social Media if you own a business. I do not agree with this point of view. Just because your competitors are spending money and time to be on Social Media, that does not mean that you have to spend your marketing budget the same way.

Not every business has the resources to manage a Social Media Marketing Program. And not every business that gets on Social Media gets anything back from it expect another time and cost expense. That is because Social Media requires an investment. You have to invest your time. You have to invest your money. And you have to invest patience. You have to get in for the right reasons and with the right goals and then you have to persist.

For instance, if you have a website that sells products directly to consumers; it is going to take time to find your customers and engage them. But once you have engaged them, then you have to keep them engaged. But guess what, there are easier ways to do that then to put out a blog or tweet. There are easier and more cost effective ways of doing that then to make memes and post them to your facebook page. Or pinterest account.

That is why there are so many abandoned twitter accounts for businesses. There are so many abandoned facebook pages for organizations and businesses. If many of these accounts are not abandoned, they are neglected. And that is the rub isnt’t it? Yes, just about anyone can figure out how to set up a twitter account or a blog. Just about anyone can make a facebook page. But then what?

How do you pay for the content that most of these accounts require to garner any attention? Or how do you pay for the manpower to keep growing them? Or to manage responses to your posts or tweets? How do you make that time and money pay off? That is the big question isn’t it?

I live in Youngstown Ohio. And I started a podcast because I believed that there was and still is a need to talk about the good things that happen here locally. Our mainstream media outlets have a bad habit of featuring bad news and talking about the bad things that happen here. Don’t get me wrong. They do help to highlight some of the good things too. But sometimes, I get the feeling it is only because they are concerned someone may challenge their FCC License if they don’t include some Community News.

So in the course of researching twitter accounts and facebook pages as a means of reaching my audience, I found out a few things that made me decide to write this article. First, in a market this size, some local merchants do have twitter accounts and facebook pages. Some have done OK with getting followers and likes. But many are not actually that active. The most active accounts belong to other media companies or marketing companies. Or the local University.

This lead me to the conclusion that too many companies and organizations are spending time and money on using Social Media to their detriment. They are spending time and money to manage Social Media accounts so they can get 2 shares or 5 retweets. And their reach is not really expanding. They are not really finding new audiences or selling more services. Even the marketing companies here struggle to use these channels effectively.

Does this mean that it cannot be done. Absolutely not. It means that many people jumped in on the Social Media Bandwagon, but are not able to actually benefit. Or they are able to benefit some, but without a dedicated manager for their Social Media; they may have no idea on how much if at all. Or worse, they are spending money and time with an Agency and are not really seeing any measurable results. Because far too many Digital Agencies or “experts” are not sufficiently trained to actually determine if they are making an impact on the bottom line. Sure they may be able to say, look we got you 10 new followers this week or 20 new likes on your facebook page; but can they tell you that it translated into x new customer or leads?

That is where Social Media Management and Assessment Services come into play. You may already be into Social Media, but is it really doing anything for you? That is the big question. Is your organization or business getting anything back for your time and money?

If you are unsure, then it is time to call in someone who can help you find out. So call me and let’s talk. You can also find out more about Social Media Management and Assessment Services on my website. Or even better come by my facebook page and we can chat. Or one of my twitter accounts. If you are ready find out if you are getting your money’s worth on the time and effort your spend communicating on the internet, then get in touch.

I will look at your accounts and your website and give you some real time information about where you can improve. And if it makes sense, we can talk about how I can help you make some money with you investment.

Mahoning Valley Podcast Episode 12 Transcript

Listen to it here.

Transcript January 3 2017 Episode 12

Business Journal launches new Expert Series. YESS makes it easy to go green. YSU Penguins Send Off Rally. Congratulations on 60 Years in Business in Downtown Youngstown. Makerspace Meetup And Purple Cat Literature Reading.

According to the Business Journal With the arrival of the New Year, everyone is looking to take steps toward improvement, whether for themselves or their business. And to help in this quest, The Business Journal is launching Business Strategies.

The series includes 90-Second Gurus, weekly tips that cover everything from public speaking to fitness to marketing, presented by a rotating cast of five area business leaders. The videos will be posted every Monday at BusinessJournalDaily.com and a column from a guru will appear online and in print.

The videos feature important information regardless of business experience or industry. They’re also straightforward and easy to digest.

Also at the Business Journal the deadline is quickly approaching for you to tell your business story. You’ve worked hard and smart, employed sound business practices and grown a company that demonstrates the determination, resilience and leadership of our business community. That’s why we want to tell your story in Growth Report 2017!

The Business Journal’s annual progress report is the No. 1 source of company information in the Mahoning and Shenango valleys. If you tell us your story, we’ll include it among the 200-plus organizations featured in this one-of-its kind publication. There is no charge to submit story information but we ask that you follow the guidelines.

YESS The Youngstown Environmental Sustainability Society makes it easy to go green. According to the Jambar, Angelica McKenney said she remembers seeing the greenhouse at Ward Beecher as a child, marveling at the big, beautiful plants inside. When she started attending YSU, the greenhouse was filled with clutter instead of plants.

As president of the Youngstown Environmental Sustainability Society, she has been working with the organization to make the greenhouse functional and thriving again.

YESS aims to raise awareness about environmental sustainability and teaching students how to grow their own vegetables. McKenney got permission from Ian Renne, assistant professor of Ecology, to use the greenhouse if they cleared it out, since they weren’t allowed to create gardens on campus.

“So that’s what we did. We cleaned it up, found some seeds and dirt, and we started planting things,” she said.

“We are in a food desert; we aren’t exploding with agriculture,” she said.

Last semester, YESS started a program called Adopt-A-Plant, where students from Cafaro House were encouraged to plant a seed at the greenhouse and then take the potted plant back to their dorms when it started producing vegetables. Cafaro House didn’t approve of keeping plants inside dorms, so YESS began donating the vegetables to the Rescue Mission. Recently, they donated three pounds of lettuce to the Rescue Mission. McKenney said they plan on donating vegetables to the Student Food Pantry once the pantry gets a refrigerator to store fresh food.

“Helping to provide food for people is the main purpose of our Adopt-A-Plant program,” she said. “While promoting the greenhouse is a secondary objective, we are growing plants for a reason.”

According to the YSU Wesbsite The public is invited to join Youngstown State University students, cheerleaders, alumni and the pep band to cheer on the Penguin football team at a Championship Send-Off Rally 11 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017, on the YSU campus.

The rally is just one of many events planned during Penguin Championship Week as YSU seeks its fifth national title. Kickoff for the Football Championship Series title game is noon Eastern/11 a.m. Central on Saturday, Jan. 7, vs. James Madison, at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas, north of Dallas.

“This has been an amazing run to the title game for Coach Bo Pelini and our Penguins,” YSU President Jim Tressel said. “Let’s show them our support and our Penguin Pride by turning out strong to cheer them on.”

The send-off rally, sponsored by the YSU Woo Crew and the Division of University Relations, will be on Armed Forces Boulevard adjacent to Fifth Avenue and just south of Stambaugh Stadium on the YSU campus. At the rally, Penguins players will board buses and depart for the Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport for the trip to Texas.

According to the Vindicator A lot has changed in downtown Youngstown over the past 60 years, but one thing has remained constant: Since 1952, Nicholas Yurchyk has been repairing watches on West Federal Street.

Yurchyk first tried his hand at watch repair when he was about 12. “I decided I was going to fix my father’s pocket watch,” he said with a laugh. “I ruined it, and he tanned my hide. I got a good lickin’ for it.”

He continued to tinker with clocks through high school. Shortly after he graduated from Chaney High School, the watch repairman at Livingston’s department store was impressed with Yurchyk’s knowledge and asked him to come in to meet the boss.

“I walked in on Monday with a suit and tie,” Yurchyk said. “[Jimmy Livingston] was smoking a big cigar, and he said, ‘Nah, we don’t need anybody.’ Well, I walked out of there broken-hearted.”

He stopped in at Best Jewelers down the street and had better luck. The store’s watch repairman took him on for a five-year apprenticeship. At $18 a week, it was enough for him to pay off his tools by the end of the term – the same tool kit sits on the counter at Vogue Jewelers today.

His shop at 19 W Federal Street doesn’t look like much, but you can be assured that when you go in there; you are going to be served by someone with enough experience to fix anything wrong with your watch. So go by there and congratulate Mr Yurchyk and get your watch fixed too.

The Oak Hill Collaborative will be hosting one of its Weekly Meetups Wednesday Night

According to their website the Makerspace is is a major part of the Collaborative; available to incubator participants, residents of the neighborhood, and other interested parties, the MakerSpace is a “community center with tools” providing access to a wide array of equipment and tools including several 3D printers, computers, wood working equipment, assorted hand tools, air compressors and the like with more being donated, borrowed, and otherwise acquired all the time. Our weekly MakerSpace meetings bring the community together to think, build and share their ideas and expertise on a variety of projects.

So if you want to get out there are do some networking, find more information on the event page on facebook, (link above) or their website. (also linked above)

Or if you are into some literature and want to hear some published authors read some of their works, head on downtown to the Purple Cat LitYoungstown will be hosting Reading

We open the new year with two engaging and innovative writers! Thank you to the Purple Cat for the invitation to kick off our series in their new theater. Doors open at 6:30.

An open mic emceed by Lit Youngstown intern Sarah Davis will follow the reading! If you’re inspired, bring some work written by you or someone you admire.

Robert Miltner’s collection of prose poetry, Hotel Utopia, won the Many Voices Project book prize from New Rivers Press. His collection of flash fiction, And Your Bird Can Sing, was published by Bottom Dog Books. Recent nonfiction can be found in DIAGRAM, The Los Angeles Review, Hawai’i Pacific Review, Pithead Chapel and Great Lakes Review. He teaches at Kent State University and in the NEOMFA.

Molly Fuller has been a Semifinalist for the Jeanne Leiby Memorial chapbook award from The Florida Review and she was a Finalist for the Key West Literary Seminar’s emerging writer award. Her prose and poetry can be found in NANO Fiction, Union Station Magazine, Potomac, and 100 word story and her flash sequence “Hold Your Breath” is in the White Pine Press flash sequence anthology, Nothing to Declare. She was also the co-winner of the Storygami contest at the 2016 Summer Festival of the Arts in Youngstown. Fuller is a Teaching Fellow in the Literature program at Kent State University.

Todays Target Foreign Imports

Image courtesy of http://www.themadeinamericamovement.com/

Yes, they are cheap. Yes, I know; they help the economy by driving consumer sales. But I still have no love for foreign imports. Whether it be cars, or kitchen appliances, or cell phones, or toys. It’s all junk in my view. And buying it causes me to become a participant in the foreign labor market. Where people have no rights in many places. Where people are treated like animals and paid horribly low wages for hard, dangerous, and dirty work.

That is one of the reasons that I discriminate against foreign imported goods. The way they are made is an affront to decent human dignity and decency in many cases. Consider the scandals of labor relations that have occurred in Asia. The linked article only details four different times and places where people have been treated like dirt. Where they were discriminated against despite trying to do honest work and earn a living wage.

And this excerpt from Salon.com.  Americans have reason to cringe over the sad conditions forced on Cambodian clothing makers. The United States is the top destination for “Made in Cambodia” clothes. Major brands such as Gap, Marks & Spencer and Adidas all rely on Cambodians to stitch their clothing.

Outlets such as H&M can sell hoodies for as little as $25 because Cambodian women (almost all the workers are women) will sew for roughly 50 cents per hour.

Cambodia’s clothing factories are notoriously unpleasant. They’re hot and loud. Workers routinely flop on the floor in mass fainting episodes. Last year, strikes for better pay were crushed by authorities who shot dozens dead.

But of course it goes beyond how foreign workers are treated in many cases. It goes to quality as well. Who has not thought to themselves after some widget broke or failed, “Chinese piece of excrement.” ? And the funny thing is that although now most of the consumer goods that we purchase are made in China, this is the second or third time around for this phenomena; although it used to be Japanese goods or Mexican goods.

What is the bottom line? If it is made somewhere other than America, it is likely to bring either labor relations problems or quality problems with it. So buy American when you can, because at least that way you know the people who made it won’t get killed for going on strike and if you don’t like the way it works, you can complain to someone who speaks the same language you do.